FB Oct 2019 180.000 put

OPR - OPR Delayed Price. Currency in USD
0.0300
-1.2000 (-97.56%)
As of 3:54PM EDT. Market open.
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous Close1.1600
Open0.1500
Bid0.0000
Ask0.0100
Strike180.00
Expire Date2019-10-11
Day's Range0.0100 - 1.8400
Contract RangeN/A
Volume3,843
Open Interest1.57k
  • One-on-One with Facebook's Calibra Head David Marcus
    Yahoo Finance Video

    One-on-One with Facebook's Calibra Head David Marcus

    The head of Facebook’s blockchain project discussed the future of Libra, regulatory hurdles and improving commerce on the platform in a wide-ranging interview with Yahoo Finance reporter Brian Cheung in Washington, DC.

  • Bloomberg

    Google’s Pixel Gets Unorthodox Zoom From AI

    (Bloomberg) -- Google’s latest smartphone demonstrates how artificial intelligence and software can enhance a camera’s capabilities, one of the most important selling points of any mobile device.The Pixel 4, the latest entrant in a phone line defined by its cameras, touts an upgraded ability to zoom in when shooting photos as its biggest upgrade. But the Alphabet Inc. company isn’t going about it the way that Samsung Electronics Co., Huawei Technologies Co. or Apple Inc. have done -- instead of adding multiple cameras with complicated optics, Google has opted for a single extra lens that relies on AI and processing to fill in the quality gap.In place of the usual spec barrage, Google prefers to talk about a “software-defined camera,” Isaac Reynolds, product manager on the company’s Pixel team, said in an interview. The device should be judged by the end-product, he argued, which Google claims is a 3x digital zoom that matches the quality of optical zoom from multi-lens arrays. The Pixel 4 has two lenses with a magnification factor between them that’s less than 2x, and the tech that extends that useful range is almost entirely software.The success of the Pixel’s camera is instrumental to Google’s broader ambitions: it drives Google Photos adoption, provides more fodder for Google’s image libraries, and helps create better experiences with augmented-reality applications -- such as this year’s new on-screen walking directions in Google Maps.Google’s IPhone Retort: More Cameras and AI in New Pixel PhonesSuper Res Zoom, a feature Google launched last year, uses the slight hand movements of a photographer when capturing a shot -- usually a hurdle to creating crisp images -- as an advantage in crafting an image that’s sharper than it otherwise would be. The camera shoots a burst of quick takes, each one from a slightly different position because of the camera shake, then combines them into a single image. It’s an algorithmic trick that lets Google collect more information from imaging hardware, and potentially also a moat against any rivals trying to copy Google -- because others can’t just buy the same imaging sensors and replicate the results.To augment its reliance on AI and machine-learning tasks, Google has designed and added its own Pixel Neural Core chip for the Pixel 4 lineup. It accelerates the machine-learning speed of the device and, again, is intended to differentiate Google’s offering from other Android smartphones on the market with a Qualcomm Snapdragon processor at its core.The other major tool in Google’s AI kit is called RAISR, or Rapid and Accurate Image Super Resolution, which trains AI on vast libraries of images so it can more effectively enhance the resolution of images. The system is taught to recognize particular patterns, edges and visual features, so that when it detects them in lower-quality shots, it knows how to improve them. That’s key to creating zoom with “a lot smoother quality degradation,” as Reynolds put it. With more than a billion Google Photos users, the U.S. company has a massive supply of images to train its software on.Among the other features that Google offers with the Pixel 4 is the ability to identify the faces of people that a user photographs most often and ensure that they’re prioritized when capturing new snapshots -- making sure the camera focuses on them and that their eyes aren’t closed, for instance. That use of software technology has defined Google’s devices to date and is also evident in the way Facebook Inc., Amazon.com Inc. and Apple aim to employ their own AI systems.To contact the reporter on this story: Vlad Savov in Tokyo at vsavov5@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Edwin Chan at echan273@bloomberg.net, Peter ElstromFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • $30 Billion of Proof That India's Tech Scene Is Back
    Bloomberg

    $30 Billion of Proof That India's Tech Scene Is Back

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- India’s largest startup is ready to birth its own unicorn. That’d be unusual anywhere, but that it’s happening in India offers some hope for the country’s long-awaited tech renaissance. This is also  great news for Walmart Inc. The U.S. retail behemoth paid $16 billion for 77% of India e-commerce company Flipkart Group in May last year. That deal included payments unit PhonePe — an early pioneer in the digital-wallet business — which Flipkart had acquired two years earlier. Now Walmart is engineering a spinoff as part of a $1 billion funding round that could value payment unit at up to $10 billion and give the retailer an 82% stake in PhonePe and Flipkart, India’s Economic Times reported. From one $20.8 billion company 18 months ago, India will get two unicorns at a combined value of up to $30 billion.(1)There are already indications that PhonePe has shed its Flipkart training wheels. From 50% of its transactions three years ago, Flipkart now accounts for just 0.5%, Indian media outlet The Ken reported, citing PhonePe’s head of strategy and planning. During Flipkart’s annual Big Billion Days sale last month, PhonePe’s logo no longer had top billing on the e-commerce website, according to The Ken. Instead it was listed as just one of the many payment options available to online shoppers.  That PhonePe is preparing to fly solo is also a sign of India’s maturing digital sector. Not only is the company willing to directly tackle rivals such as Alphabet Inc.’s Google Pay and Facebook Inc.’s forthcoming WhatsApp payments, but it’s also managing to survive in the scary wilderness beyond the gates of Flipkart. (Survive, of course, is a relative term. It’s likely still burning cash and posting losses, though at least it can keep up with well-funded adversaries, a key measure of success at this point in the game.)More broadly, the PhonePe spinoff would strengthen the case that a homegrown hero can hold its own when foreign rivals enter. Paytm, another Indian startup, is on the verge of landing a $2 billion round of funding from investors including Ant Financial, SoftBank Group Corp. and Discovery Capital Management which could give it a $16 billion valuation, Bloomberg News reported this week.Hopefully the momentum at both PhonePe and Paytm will spur more Indian entrepreneurship, feeding a rebirth in India’s tech sector not seen since the IT-outsourcing boom two decades ago. While that gave us Tata Consultancy Services Ltd., Infosys Ltd., Wipro Ltd. and dozens more, most of those businesses focused on serving foreign needs. Now, a crop of stars is emerging to meet the needs of India’s 1.3 billion people. It’s not a big step from this spinoff to an actual IPO, a development that will put India back on the global technology map.(1) This assumes no reduced valuation for Flipkart.To contact the author of this story: Tim Culpan at tculpan1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Rachel Rosenthal at rrosenthal21@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Tim Culpan is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering technology. He previously covered technology for Bloomberg News.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Tech Sector Leads as Stocks Move Higher
    Investopedia

    Tech Sector Leads as Stocks Move Higher

    With tech stocks leading the market higher, Apple is separating from the pack, but Intel is not nimble enough to keep up.

  • Bloomberg

    Facebook's Marcus Vows to 'Move Forward' With Libra, Add Members

    (Bloomberg) -- The Facebook Inc. executive responsible for the embattled Libra cryptocurrency said he doesn’t fault companies that pulled out of the project, adding that he’s optimistic more organizations will sign on despite intense opposition from politicians who seem to fear financial innovation.“I totally respect the fact that those businesses and those leaders have a responsibility to their shareholders, employees and stakeholders,” Facebook’s David Marcus said in a Tuesday interview with Bloomberg Television. “We are going to move forward. We are going to add more members.”Facebook suffered a setback in recent days when a quarter of the membership of Libra’s governing body, the Libra Association, defected from the effort amid pushback from regulators and lawmakers. Among those who stepped away are some of the association’s most high-profile names, including Visa Inc., Stripe Inc. and Mastercard Inc.Visa, Stripe and Mastercard received letters earlier this month from Democratic U.S. Senators Sherrod Brown and Brian Schatz that urged the companies to “carefully consider” how they would manage potential risks associated with Libra before proceeding with the project. Asked if he thought the letter constituted a threat from the senators to the companies, Marcus responded, "I don’t know, what did it sound like to you?" He added that such correspondence can have a chilling effect.“For these types of letters to be circulated for a thing that is an idea -- a project -- and telling people you should not explore innovation,” that is a concern, Marcus said. “The core of our financial system has not evolved much. Consumers all around the world are paying the price for it,” he added.Facebook announced its Libra plans in June, saying the digital token would give consumers a low-cost way to make payments and transfer money across the globe. Regulators and lawmakers have expressed concerns that the coin would be used to bypass money-laundering rules and might undermine central banks’ control over monetary policy.The Libra Association, which held its first meeting in Geneva this week, has said it has more than enough willing companies waiting in the wings to join the project. There are 1,500 organizations who have expressed interest in signing on, the association said, though so far only 180 of them meet the organization’s criteria.Even if new backers do sign on, Libra is still a long way from reality. Facebook executives and the Libra Association have said they won’t launch the currency until regulators in the U.S. and elsewhere have been appeased.Industry-watchers will soon get a fresh look at lawmakers’ sentiment toward Libra. Facebook Chief Executive Officer Mark Zuckerberg is slated to testify before the House Financial Services Committee next week.To contact the reporters on this story: Julie Verhage in New York at jverhage2@bloomberg.net;Kurt Wagner in San Francisco at kwagner71@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Jesse Westbrook at jwestbrook1@bloomberg.net, Anne VanderMeyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Fintech Stocks For Your Portfolio Of The Future
    Zacks

    Fintech Stocks For Your Portfolio Of The Future

    Fintech Stocks For Your Portfolio Of The Future

  • This is why your Taco Bell was mysteriously out of beef over the weekend
    MarketWatch

    This is why your Taco Bell was mysteriously out of beef over the weekend

    The Yum! Brands chain pulled 2.3 million pounds of seasoned meat over fears it was laced with metal shavings

  • Is the IPO Party Over? ETFs in Focus
    Zacks

    Is the IPO Party Over? ETFs in Focus

    We take a look at the IPO landscape and ETFs that provide a safer way to invest in in newly public companies.

  • Benzinga

    Jon Najarian Highlights Unusual Activity In American Airlines And Facebook

    On CNBC's "Fast Money Halftime Report," Jon Najarian spoke about unusually high options activity in American Airlines Group Inc (NASDAQ: AAL ) and Facebook, Inc. (NASDAQ: FB ). American Airlines ...

  • Barrons.com

    The Dow Is Soaring and Investors Are Loading Up on Risky Stocks

    With the Dow rising, and risks from Brexit and the trade war lower, investors are apparently ready to take a little risk. They’re selling utilities and staples and buying the market’s most risky stocks.

  • Warren and Biden Attack Facebook’s Most Successful Business
    Market Realist

    Warren and Biden Attack Facebook’s Most Successful Business

    Senator Elizabeth Warren and former vice president Joe Biden are both critics of how Facebook runs its huge advertising business.

  • Elizabeth Warren Vows to Be First Nominee to Forgo High-Dollar Fundraisers
    Bloomberg

    Elizabeth Warren Vows to Be First Nominee to Forgo High-Dollar Fundraisers

    (Bloomberg) -- Elizabeth Warren pledged Tuesday to forgo any high-dollar fundraising events if she becomes the Democratic nominee, a move that would make her the first general-election candidate to do so and could be a high-stakes gamble against a cash-rich incumbent and a well-funded GOP apparatus.But Warren would still accept high-dollar contributions from most people who choose to write her a check without getting special access or seeing her in person. She also vowed to refuse to accept “any contributions over $200 from executives at big tech companies, big banks, private equity firms, or hedge funds.”Warren’s pledge also wouldn’t stop the party or super-PACs from raising vast amounts of money on her behalf. But it may stop wealthy donors from cutting big checks if they believe it won’t help them get access to the nominee.“When I’m the Democratic nominee for president, I’m not going to change a thing in how I run my campaign: No PACs. No federal lobbyists. No special access or call time with rich donors or big dollar fundraisers to underwrite my campaign,” Warren said in a statement released by her campaign.Still, some Democrats fear it would put the party at a huge fundraising disadvantage against President Donald Trump, who’s raking in vast sums of money from big donors by his own campaign and by super-PACs that support him.Rufus Gifford, the finance director for former President Barack Obama’s 2012 campaign, has said Warren’s earlier suggestions to avoid high-dollar events was “a colossally stupid decision” that would cost Democrats not only in the presidential contest but also in down-ballot races.But it also reflects her populist pitch to be a different kind of candidate who isn’t corrupted by special interest money, and so far she has proven adept at generating small-dollar contributions that are envied by her party rivals.A Warren campaign aide said the decision to accept no more than $200 from executives and big tech or financial firms was “retroactive” and any contributions above $200 from those people would be returned.The aide also said that big tech companies under this guideline will include Alphabet Inc., which is Google’s parent company; Amazon.com Inc., Apple Inc., Facebook Inc., Microsoft Corp., Lyft Inc. and Uber Technologies Inc.Nominees traditionally complain about the amount of time needed to raise money in a campaign and call for changes in financing presidential races, but then say they can’t “unilaterally disarm” against a well-funded opponent.Warren’s bet is that her pitch will propel her campaign in the Democratic contest -- where she’s tied with Joe Biden for the top spot -- and mobilize many of the estimated 100 million eligible voters who didn’t turn out in the 2016 election. Biden spends a significant amount of time raising money from traditional donor bases.It’s unclear how Warren’s pledge would apply to the Democratic National Committee, which can accept contributions from individuals of as much as $355,000 for various accounts, including $35,500 per donor that can be used to influence the election.And it wouldn’t apply to outside groups like super-PACs, which under federal law cannot coordinate their activities with campaigns. In 2016, Priorities USA had more than 30 individual donors who contributed more than $1 million.Obama barred contributions from registered lobbyists and corporate PACs. The DNC was outraised by its Republican counterpart in 2012 by almost $100 million, yet Obama, a popular incumbent, won overwhelmingly against rival Mitt Romney in the election. The party lifted the bans in 2016, and the DNC raised $354 million compared to $343 million for the Republican National Committee.Warren often highlights her approach to fundraising on the campaign trail, reassuring prospective voters that her campaign is fueled by them, not big dollar donors.“I don’t spend my time at fundraisers for bazilionaires and corporate executives,” Warren said during a town hall in Austin, Texas, last month. “I just don’t do it.”When asked whether her grassroots fundraising model could leave her without enough money to go against Trump in the general election, Warren was adamant that a flurry of contributions between $5 and $25 would be enough. Trump and the RNC raised $125 million in the first quarter, more than all of the major Democrats combined.“If you think it’s going to be all about scooping up a bunch of money from rich people, and then buying a bunch of TV ads, and that’s how it is someone’s gonna win, then, yeah, it looks like Trump’s doing a lot here,” Warren said recently in San Diego. “I just don’t think that’s how democracy works anymore. And I sure don’t think that’s how it’s going to work in 2020. I think it’s going to be about getting out and building a grassroots movement.”In his battle against Hillary Clinton in 2016, Bernie Sanders relied primarily on small-dollar donors to raise $235.4 million through the end of May 2016, nearly matching the $238.2 million she raised over the same period.But Clinton also had joint fundraising committees that raised millions for the Democratic National Committee and state parties.Trump is using the same arrangements to build a huge financial advantage over his rivals. His campaign and the RNC, plus a pair of joint fundraising committees that raise money for each, have taken more than $300 million through this year, according to Federal Election Commission reports and totals announced by Trump’s re-election effort.Warren has raised $60.2 million in the same period, including about $10 million she transferred from her Senate campaign.(Updates with Warren aide saying big tech donation policy was retroactive in eighth, ninth paragraphs.)To contact the reporters on this story: Sahil Kapur in Washington at skapur39@bloomberg.net;Bill Allison in Washington at ballison14@bloomberg.net;Misyrlena Egkolfopoulou in Washington at megkolfopoul@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Wendy Benjaminson at wbenjaminson@bloomberg.net, Max BerleyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Sweden Central Bank governor calls Facebook’s Libra a “catalytic event”
    Decrypt

    Sweden Central Bank governor calls Facebook’s Libra a “catalytic event”

    Riksbank head Stefan Ingves says the introduction of Facebook’s Libra came “out of the blue” and forced Sweden's central bank to think hard about its work.

  • Why Apple's Stock Is Soaring as Fellow FAANGs Languish
    Investopedia

    Why Apple's Stock Is Soaring as Fellow FAANGs Languish

    Apple Inc.'s (AAPL) stock plunged 18% off its highs this spring as slowing iPhone sales prompted many on Wall Street to say the company's growth days are over. Since then, Apple's shares have staged a remarkable rebound, rising 50% year to date as sales of the iPhone 11 beat expectations and amid raised forecasts for both its new entertainment streaming service and its share price. Apple's gain has created a striking divergence from its fellow FAANG stock members, all of which once were regarded as growth stocks.

  • Democratic debate: 5 things investors and Trump must watch out for
    Yahoo Finance

    Democratic debate: 5 things investors and Trump must watch out for

    Wake up and pay attention to the latest Democratic debate, investors.

  • Barrons.com

    Apple, Boeing, Exxon, Facebook, and Micron to Blame for Earnings Recession

    Profit declines for Apple, Boeing, Exxon, Facebook and Micron led the S&P 500 to the first string of consecutive quarterly earnings declines since 2017.

  • Facebook’s Libra unravels, and for good reason
    MarketWatch

    Facebook’s Libra unravels, and for good reason

    Plans for Facebook’s proposed “stablecoin,” Libra, appear to be unraveling. This is hardly surprising, given growing awareness of Libra’s potential adverse consequences. If it offers anonymity to its users, Libra will become a platform for tax evasion, money laundering and terrorist finance.

  • Snap Stock: Is an Uptrend Ahead after the Recent Dip?
    Market Realist

    Snap Stock: Is an Uptrend Ahead after the Recent Dip?

    Snap (SNAP) stock has been on a downtrend recently. It's dropped nearly 20% since September 25 despite the absence of any significant news.

  • Here's Why DICK'S Sporting is a Solid Investment Pick Now
    Zacks

    Here's Why DICK'S Sporting is a Solid Investment Pick Now

    DICK'S Sporting (DKS) witnesses strong momentum on efforts to build the best omni-channel platform as well as robust merchandising initiatives.

  • Risks from Facebook's Libra must be addressed before launch: Bank of France official
    Reuters

    Risks from Facebook's Libra must be addressed before launch: Bank of France official

    The risks posed by cryptocurrencies such as Facebook's Libra must be addressed before any launch, a senior Bank of France official said on Tuesday, adding to a chorus of regulatory scepticism that threatens to derail the project. Since Facebook announced its plans for Libra in June, politicians and regulators around the world have voiced concern about the project, saying it risked upsetting global financial stability, undermining users' privacy and enabling money laundering. In the latest warning shot, Denis Beau, first deputy governor of the Bank of France, said the widespread use of such cryptocurrencies was fraught with peril.

  • Shopify Stock Has Doubled In 2019 — Does A New Buy Point Make It A Buy?
    Investor's Business Daily

    Shopify Stock Has Doubled In 2019 — Does A New Buy Point Make It A Buy?

    Shopify has been a huge winner in 2019. Earnings are booming and the company plans to compete more with Amazon. But with software stocks under pressure, is SHOP stock a buy now?