FB Jun 2021 125.000 put

OPR - OPR Delayed Price. Currency in USD
5.63
0.00 (0.00%)
As of 11:08AM EDT. Market open.
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous Close5.63
Open5.63
Bid4.95
Ask6.60
Strike125.00
Expire Date2021-06-18
Day's Range5.63 - 5.63
Contract RangeN/A
Volume1
Open Interest190
  • 'Compare culture' online could be hurting your teenager
    Yahoo Finance Video

    'Compare culture' online could be hurting your teenager

    It's no secret that social media has radically altered how we behave online – but are those behaviors a bad thing? VSCO CEO Joel Flory joins The Final Round to discuss the rapidly evolving digital landscape, and how mental wellness trends are being popularized online.

  • Facebook, Google, and Twitter to address mass violence and extremism online at Senate hearing
    Yahoo Finance

    Facebook, Google, and Twitter to address mass violence and extremism online at Senate hearing

    On Wednesday, U.S. Senators are questioning officials from those three companies at a hearing on extremism online — the latest in a string of inquiries on Capitol Hill that focuses on Big Tech.

  • Facebook expects to name members of new oversight board by end of year
    MarketWatch

    Facebook expects to name members of new oversight board by end of year

    Facebook says it expects to name the first members of a quasi-independent oversight board by year-end. The board will rule on thorny content issues, such as when a Facebook or Instagram post constitutes hate speech.

  • Facebook is partnering up with London police to develop technology to identify terror attacks
    Quartz

    Facebook is partnering up with London police to develop technology to identify terror attacks

    Facebook needs more training data for its AI systems, which failed to detect the attack in Christchurch, New Zealand.

  • Facebook oversight board won’t have mandate to change policy
    Reuters

    Facebook oversight board won’t have mandate to change policy

    Facebook Inc will allow a new outside oversight board to make final decisions on whether individual pieces of content can be displayed on the social media site, but the group won't be able to make policy changes, the company said on Tuesday. The board is meant as a type of appeals body through which users can challenge company decisions on controversial content. "The board's decision will be binding, even if I or anyone at Facebook disagrees with it," Chief Executive Mark Zuckerberg said in a statement, referring to calls on specific content, such as photos and videos.

  • Facebook Releases Rules for Its Independent Content Board
    Bloomberg

    Facebook Releases Rules for Its Independent Content Board

    (Bloomberg) -- Facebook Inc., ahead of a congressional hearing on violent content, revealed the charter for an independent oversight board that will make irreversible decisions about what posts stay up and come down, even if the company disagrees.The board, which Facebook started talking about in January and which will begin to hear cases early next year, represents the first real check on Facebook’s power to decide who gets a voice on its site. Its members -- at least 11 people at any given time and fully staffed at 40 -- will be the final word on controversial cases that affect Facebook’s 2.7 billion users. The board’s charter outlines a vision that is easier said than done.The members will “exhibit a broad range of knowledge, competencies, diversity and expertise” with no “actual or perceived” conflicts of interest that would affect their decisions on user content, according to the charter revealed Tuesday. They will “collaborate in decision-making to foster an environment of collegiality, and issue principled decisions and policy recommendations using clearly articulated reasoning.” The committee deciding on cases will include one member from the region of the post in dispute.Facebook spent months deliberating with outside experts to ensure the board acts independently, even though members are paid indirectly by the tech giant. Funding is channeled through a trust and the trustees can’t fire board members if they make bad content decisions, only if their conduct is poor. At stake is the trust of Facebook’s users, who sometimes don’t understand why posts are removed, or why questionable content they report remains online.The company is also dealing with increasingly damaging types of content -- like posts to recruit terrorists or influence elections. On Wednesday, executives from Facebook, Twitter Inc. and Google will testify before a Senate committee on violent content and extremism, after a string of mass shootings, some of which were broadcast live on social media.Kate Klonick, an assistant professor at St. John’s University Law School, has been embedded at Facebook to observe the oversight board’s creation, including sitting in on meetings with staff. She described a notable update: The board can provide feedback on Facebook policies, and the company will review that and write a public statement explaining why it did or did not change a policy as a result.“That’s actually kind of a huge deal,” Klonick said. “That’s probably the most accountable we’ve ever seen Facebook.”There are still elements that are unclear, according to Klonick. The charter references “bylaws” -- the “operational procedures of the board” -- and a Code of Conduct outlining the “norms, procedures, and proper practices” expected of board members. Neither exists right now, but both will be important to start the board off in the right direction with the right set of principles, she said.To contact the reporters on this story: Sarah Frier in San Francisco at sfrier1@bloomberg.net;Kurt Wagner in San Francisco at kwagner71@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Jillian Ward at jward56@bloomberg.net, Alistair Barr, Molly SchuetzFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • How To Handle IPO Stocks: Lessons From Facebook, Snap, Uber, Beyond Meat, Peloton
    Investor's Business Daily

    How To Handle IPO Stocks: Lessons From Facebook, Snap, Uber, Beyond Meat, Peloton

    Interested in IPO stocks like Uber, Beyond Meat, Zscaler and Peloton? Learn lessons from Facebook, Alibaba and Snap before investing in IPO stocks.

  • Should You Buy Vegan Stocks & ETF?
    Zacks

    Should You Buy Vegan Stocks & ETF?

    Beyond Meat is one of the hottest IPOs this year and a new ETF aims to capitalize on the trend.

  • Facebook's Libra will be disruptive, says ECB's Coeure
    Reuters

    Facebook's Libra will be disruptive, says ECB's Coeure

    Digital currencies such as Facebook's Libra will disrupt the financial system, either by forcing central banks to innovate or by grabbing a global role that could challenge the dominance of the dollar, ECB board member Benoit Coeure said on Tuesday. Looking to set up a cheap global payment network, Facebook announced plans earlier this year to create the Libra "stablecoin" by next year, spooking global regulators who are now scrambling to come up with the needed regulation. "Global 'stablecoin' initiatives, such as Libra, will prove disruptive in one way or another," Coeure told a conference in Luxembourg.

  • Reuters

    UPDATE 1-Facebook's Libra will be disruptive, says ECB's Coeure

    Digital currencies such as Facebook's Libra will disrupt the financial system, either by forcing central banks to innovate or by grabbing a global role that could challenge the dominance of the dollar, ECB board member Benoit Coeure said on Tuesday. Looking to set up a cheap global payment network, Facebook announced plans earlier this year to create the Libra "stablecoin" by next year, spooking global regulators who are now scrambling to come up with the needed regulation. "Global 'stablecoin' initiatives, such as Libra, will prove disruptive in one way or another," Coeure told a conference in Luxembourg.

  • Is Twitter Stock A Buy Right Now? Here's What Earnings, Charts Show
    Investor's Business Daily

    Is Twitter Stock A Buy Right Now? Here's What Earnings, Charts Show

    Is Twitter stock a buy now? Check out the stock's fundamental and technical metrics to figure out if the stock should be on your watchlist.

  • London police and Facebook move to stop live streaming of terror attacks
    Reuters

    London police and Facebook move to stop live streaming of terror attacks

    London police and Facebook said on Tuesday they plan to share resources to stop the live streaming of terrorist attacks like that in Christchurch, New Zealand, earlier this year. The Metropolitan Police will share video of its firearms officers training with Facebook to help the company develop technology to identify the live streaming of an attack on its platform. Social media companies are under increasing pressure to act after a gunman killed 51 people in the New Zealand attack and live-streamed it on Facebook.

  • GuruFocus.com

    Debating Alphabet Inc.

    Positive and negative thoughts on Alphabet Inc. Continue reading...

  • Will Purdue’s Bankruptcy Engulf Its Owners?
    Bloomberg

    Will Purdue’s Bankruptcy Engulf Its Owners?

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- The bankruptcy of Purdue Pharma LP lays bare a distinction that the internet is making it more and more difficult to maintain: that between a company and the people who own or founded it.The Sackler family owns Purdue Pharma, the maker of the opioid OxyContin, which has contributed to a crisis that has resulted in the deaths of hundreds of thousands of Americans. There are numerous charges and more than 2,000 lawsuits against the company and its owners, and some recent joint settlements. The company has now declared bankruptcy, and wants to give control of Purdue to a trust run by the states, cities and counties that have filed suit against it.But what about the personal fortune of the Sacklers, estimated at $13 billion or more? Under traditional corporate theory, there is a clear distinction between the assets of the corporation and those of the owners. The limited liability company can go under, but the assets of the company owners are safe — just as, say, holding shares of Volkswagen in your mutual fund did not expose you to any personal liability for the automaker’s actions in falsifying emissions data.It turns out that this distinction is harder to uphold, if only in the eyes of the public, when a single family owns and runs a company. Last week New York State alleged that the Sackler family drained at least $1 billion from Purdue for the purpose of avoiding penalties against the corporation and thus shielding its wealth. If it looks like the Sackler family was trying to avoid legal penalties and fines, there will be strong political pressure, possibly backed by public opinion, to go after those additional funds.More generally, if a company is endangered by lawsuits, and the suits are not settled, its owners have a rationale to extract money from the company and stash it far away. But doing so will elicit a legal and public response, and the distinction between the personal and the corporate will not always be respected.Consider the Federal Trade Commission’s recent settlement with Facebook, under which some of founder Mark Zuckerberg’s personal assets are potentially on the line if Facebook does not respect its privacy agreements with the federal government. Some FTC commissioners suggested harsher treatment yet for Zuckerberg’s personal assets.Or, to give another example, Senator Elizabeth Warren has been promoting the notion of personal criminal liability for corporate CEOs if the firms engage in wrongdoing. Her bill would extend corporate liability beyond the company itself, and of course most CEOs of major companies are also shareholders to some extent. Maybe the goal is to punish these individuals in their roles as executives rather than as shareholders. But such penalties would blur these distinctions in the mind of the public — and eventually, perhaps, under the law.So how does the internet matter in all this? First, social media is very effective at drumming up outrage, and negative news seems to have a longer lifespan than positive news. The media’s pre-existing negative bias has been amplified, creating further animosity against any actual or supposed corporate villain.More important, social media personalizes agency — in effect, making it easier to accuse particular individuals of wrongdoing. Mark Zuckerberg, Jeff Bezos, and the Koch brothers all have images or iconic photos that can be put into a social media post, amplifying any attack on their respective companies. It is harder to vilify Exxon, in part because hardly anyone can name its CEO (Darren Woods, since 2017), who in any case did not create the current version of the company. Putting the Exxon logo on your vituperative social media post just doesn’t have the same impact. With Bill Gates having stepped down as Microsoft CEO in 2000, it is harder to vilify that company as well.This personalization of corporate evil has become a bigger issue in part because many prominent tech companies are currently led by their founders, and also because the number of publicly traded companies has been falling, which means there are fewer truly anonymous corporations. It’s not hard to imagine a future in which the most important decision a new company makes is how personalized it wants to be. A well-known founder can spark interest in the company and its products, and help to attract talent. At the same time, a personalized company is potentially a much greater target.The more human identities and feelings are part of the equation, however, the harder it will be to keep the classic distinction between a corporation and its owners. As the era of personalization evolves, it will inevitably engulf that most impersonal of entities — the corporation.(Corrects second paragraph to say that hundreds of thousands of deaths have resulted from the opioid crisis, not the opioid OxyContin, in article published Sept. 16.)To contact the author of this story: Tyler Cowen at tcowen2@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Michael Newman at mnewman43@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Tyler Cowen is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist. He is a professor of economics at George Mason University and writes for the blog Marginal Revolution. His books include "Big Business: A Love Letter to an American Anti-Hero."For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Happy First Day of Fall 2019: 5 Fall Quotes to Celebrate Autumn
    InvestorPlace

    Happy First Day of Fall 2019: 5 Fall Quotes to Celebrate Autumn

    The first day of fall is approaching and InvestorPlace is celebrating with a collection of fall quotes to share.Source: Artens / Shutterstock Fall isn't here quite yet. The first day of fall will take place on Sept. 23, 2019, which is next Monday. It will then last all the way through December 21, 2019. It's funny, you would think that fall is already here. What with all the pumpkin spice that has been making its way onto store shelves and cafe menus.Check out the following happy first day of fall quotes to share on Facebook (NASDAQ:FB), Twitter (NYSE:TWTR) and other forms of social media.InvestorPlace - Stock Market News, Stock Advice & Trading TipsHappy First Day of Fall Quotes "Fall has always been my favorite season. The time when everything bursts with its last beauty, as if nature had been saving up all year for the grand finale." -- Lauren DeStefano, Wither * 7 Momentum Stocks to Buy On the Dip Happy First Day of Fall Quotes "But when fall comes, kicking summer out on its treacherous ass as it always does one day sometime after the midpoint of September, it stays awhile like an old friend that you have missed. It settles in the way an old friend will settle into your favorite chair and take out his pipe and light it and then fill the afternoon with stories of places he has been and things he has done since last he saw you." -- Stephen King, Salem's LotHappy First Day of Fall Quotes "I cannot endure to waste anything so precious as autumnal sunshine by staying in the house." -- Nathaniel Hawthorne, The American Notebooks * 7 Tech Stocks You Should Avoid Now Happy First Day of Fall Quotes "Listen! The wind is rising, and the air is wild with leaves, We have had our summer evenings, now for October eves!" -- Humbert WolfeHappy First Day of Fall Quotes "Autumn carries more gold in its pocket than all the other seasons." -- Jim Bishop * 7 Discount Retail Stocks to Buy for a Recession As of this writing, William White did not hold a position in any of the aforementioned securities.The post Happy First Day of Fall 2019: 5 Fall Quotes to Celebrate Autumn appeared first on InvestorPlace.

  • Reuters

    UPDATE 1-Facebook briefly blocks Netanyahu chatbot on election day

    Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu lashed out at Facebook on Tuesday after the social network blocked a "chatbot" from his right-wing Likud party's account for violating election day rules. "They took a 100 kg hammer and brought it down on a fly, because it is a Likud fly," Netanyahu said in a video posted on social media. Israel's Central Elections Committee said the chatbot had been used to publish poll data in contravention of regulations.

  • Senate panel grills Justice Department and FTC chiefs over their antitrust probes into Big Tech
    MarketWatch

    Senate panel grills Justice Department and FTC chiefs over their antitrust probes into Big Tech

    Officials from the Justice Department and Federal Trade Commission may provide more information on Tuesday afternoon about their antitrust probes that are targeting Amazon.com Inc., Apple Inc., Facebook Inc. and Alphabet Inc.’s Google.

  • Facebook’s Reputation May Cause Libra to Fail
    InvestorPlace

    Facebook’s Reputation May Cause Libra to Fail

    The negative reputation of Facebook (NASDAQ:FB) looks increasingly likely to stifle its efforts to build out the Libra cryptocurrency. Despite having a 28-company consortium behind it and Facebook's efforts to reassure governments that its mobile money complies with regulations, resistance to FB's involvement seems to be hardening.Source: justplay1412 / Shutterstock.com Facebook has created a $533 billion market cap in 15 years, compared to the $378 billion JPMorgan Chase (NYSE:JPM) created in 150 years. FB built its market cap on a network of cloud data centers and free consumer services.A joint statement from French and German regulators seems unequivocal. "We believe that no private entity can claim monetary power, which is inherent to the sovereignty of Nations," representatives from the two nations wrote. European governments say they want a stable cryptocurrency, but only a cryptocurrency that they control.InvestorPlace - Stock Market News, Stock Advice & Trading Tips Is Facebook's Libra a Threat to Banking?The Libra Association consists of 28 founding members, including Visa (NYSE:V), Mastercard (NYSE:MA) and PayPal (NASDAQ:PYPL). Those three companies alone have a market cap of over $800 billion. Visa, like Facebook, is worth more than JPMorgan Chase. Payments, traditionally the job of banks, already circulate through dedicated payment networks.In theory, Libra is just a cheaper way of processing transactions. Libra coins would be tied to existing currencies and processed like credit card transactions. But transaction details wouldn't enter the world of "real money," so merchant fees would be eliminated. * 7 Momentum Stocks to Buy On the Dip The problem is that Calibra, a unit of Facebook, would handle the wallets. This seems to be behind government rejection of Libra. Regulators fear that the popularity of Facebook services, which already reach nearly two billion people, would allow it to create its own banking system. U.S. regulators also fear that Libra could be used by terrorists or as a money laundering instrument.Banks, strictly regulated by governments, are not part of the Libra group or process. JPMorgan Chase has its own coin, dubbed JPM Coin, and customer trials are underway. Big traders are getting the benefits of stable coins. Small merchants and consumers are not.Government resistance is spooking some Libra backers, who are thinking of walking away. Facebook, meanwhile, is tired of being the only company sticking its neck out. The Payment World TurnsMeanwhile, the payment world continues to turn.Alibaba (NYSE:BABA) and Tencent Holding (OTCMKTS:TCEHY) already have cost-effective, chat-based payment systems. India's Unified Payments Interface is increasingly popular. Indian mobile wallets, some backed by Alibaba, are accepted by African merchants. European banks are working with these African payment networks rather than rejecting them.Other cryptocurrencies are jumping into the payments space, claiming to be Libra's competitors. None are likely to gain traction, because they lack market penetration. But they could serve as guinea pigs for banks that want to operate cryptocurrency. One, or several, might then be acquired by banks or other payment processors and slowly scaled to compete. The Bottom Line on FB Stock and LibraTransaction processing systems have a First World problem. Their costs are only acceptable in the First World.Many nations can't afford the fees that Visa and Mastercard charge through local banks. Facebook promised such a mechanism to avoid high fees. Facebook has a global, scaled, cloud-based data network on which low-cost transaction processing services could ride. This would in theory allow Visa and MasterCard to compete with the Chinese and Indian payment groups.But Facebook's leadership of Libra frightens governments. Nations see Facebook as a threat to government sovereignty in a way that Visa and Mastercard are not.Before Libra can get going, Facebook may have to take a back seat in its own invention.Dana Blankenhorn is a financial and technology journalist. He is the author of the environmental story, Bridget O'Flynn and the Bear, available at the Amazon Kindle store. Write him at danablankenhorn@gmail.com or follow him on Twitter at @danablankenhorn. As of this writing he owned shares in BABA and JPM. More From InvestorPlace * 2 Toxic Pot Stocks You Should Avoid * 7 Momentum Stocks to Buy On the Dip * 7 Dow Titans Breaking Higher * 5 Growth Stocks to Sell as Rates Move Higher The post Facebook's Reputation May Cause Libra to Fail appeared first on InvestorPlace.

  • Facebook Says Central Banks Have Nothing to Fear From Libra
    Bloomberg

    Facebook Says Central Banks Have Nothing to Fear From Libra

    (Bloomberg) -- Want the lowdown on European markets? In your inbox before the open, every day. Sign up here.Facebook Inc. is once again defending Libra -- this time against fears that the envisioned cryptocurrency could replace sovereign currencies from the U.S. dollar to the Euro and threaten central banks’ control over money creation.David Marcus, the executive leading the project, posted a series of tweets the same day members of the Libra Association met with regulators convened by a G-7 working group in Switzerland. He argued that creating Libra isn’t the digital equivalent of printing U.S. dollars or minting new euros. The simple existence of Libra, he says, doesn’t create new value.Facebook’s crypto plans, unveiled in June, have faced intense push-back from regulators all over the world. One of the biggest concerns is that the new digital currency will be used by smugglers, drug dealers and terrorists. Another is that the social media giant, which has run afoul of regulators over user data in the past, should not be trusted to handle sensitive financial information. Facebook has said repeatedly it would be just one of many companies managing the new currency.“Recently there’s been a lot of talk about how Libra could threaten the sovereignty of nations when it comes to money,” Marcus tweeted. “Libra will be backed 1:1 by a basket of strong currencies. This means that for any unit of Libra to exist, there must be the equivalent value in its reserve,” he tweeted. “As such there’s no new money creation, which will strictly remain the province of sovereign nations.”Currency competition is yet another sticking point for wary regulators.In a follow-up call after Marcus’s tweets, Christian Catalini, the lead economist inside Facebook working on Libra, declined to say whether or not the issue came up during Monday’s meeting. But he did say that this element of Libra is one of many that are “misunderstood or not correctly interpreted.”“All of the design of Libra is really around being a complement of fiat [currencies], not a substitute,” he said.Why Everybody (Almost) Hates Facebook’s Digital Coin: QuickTakeLibra does not yet exist, and Facebook has pledged that it will not launch until regulators are appeased. It hopes to start the currency sometime in 2020. Facebook shares were little changed Tuesday in New York at $186.70.The concern from regulators is that giving over the control of currency creation to Facebook -- or any private company -- would strip governments of one of their greatest assets: monetary policy. The response from central banks has varied from active engagement as in the case of Singapore, to China considering its own equivalent.In a blog post from July on Harvard Law School’s forum for “corporate governance and financial regulation,” three professors who wrote a paper about regulating Libra argued that it posed a threat to sovereign governments.“Once Libra becomes well established in some countries, national governments will lose control of their money supply and lose monetary policy as a tool of economic expansion or contraction,” the post reads. “They will also lose the capacity, in times of severe uncertainty, to impose capital controls to prevent capital flight. All of these changes may well prove highly destabilising to the entire global financial system.”Catalini disagrees. He says that even for countries whose currency is not part of Libra’s reserve, there is little fear of Libra replacing local tender because of how the digital coin will be used. Its main purpose, Catalini says, is to help with payments that include lots of fees or burdens, like cross-border money transfers. It will be less useful for day-to-day commerce, he added.“It’s unlikely that Libra will be used locally because the local currencies have better properties” for local commerce, he said.(Updates with shares in eighth paragraph)To contact the reporter on this story: Kurt Wagner in San Francisco at kwagner71@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Jillian Ward at jward56@bloomberg.net, Edwin Chan, Joanna OssingerFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Why I’m Taking a Wait and See Approach on Snap Stock
    InvestorPlace

    Why I’m Taking a Wait and See Approach on Snap Stock

    A lot of analysts got it wrong about Snap (NYSE:SNAP) stock. In late 2018, Snapchat stock was in a tailspin. The prevailing sentiment was that the tech startup was about to be another cautionary tale regarding initial public offerings. What happened then has been nothing short of amazing. SNAP stock has grown nearly 200% in 2019, largely fueled by increasing quarterly revenue.Source: dennizn / Shutterstock.com Now, nearly a year later, the SNAP stock price is once again at a turning point. Only now, instead of wondering if Snap is a falling knife, investors wonder if shares have room to grow.But for Snap to see their stock price grow, it will need to generate more advertising revenue. With a growing user base among a desirable demographic, that sounds easy enough. However, this demographic is anything but traditional when it comes to advertising. That's a reason I think it's best to proceed with caution.InvestorPlace - Stock Market News, Stock Advice & Trading Tips Snap Has a Growing User BaseThe bullish case for Snap stock points to 13 million daily active users. That's how many active users the company added in the second quarter. This growth gave analysts a lift after a disappointing first quarter that saw Snap add just four million users. * 7 Tech Stocks You Should Avoid Now Snap's monthly user base is just above 500 million. That's more than Twitter (NYSE:TWTR) (335 million users) but still far fewer than Facebook (NASDAQ:FB) (2.4 billion). Snap has also flown under the radar while companies like Facebook and Alphabet (NASDAQ:GOOG, NASDAQ:GOOGL) draw increased regulatory scrutiny.Snap's CEO Evan Spiegel commented, "Completing these transitions has established a strong foundation for growing our community, increasing engagement and growing advertising demand." Growing Ad Demand Is Easier Said than DoneSnap has been built for, and targeted to millennials and Generation Z. These generations got social media education in middle school.The attraction of Snapchat was the idea of being able to self-produce shareable content that only stays online for a short period of time. Many reject Facebook because their content stays online unless the user deletes it.Despite interacting with multiple social media channels in one day, these generations are intensely concerned about their privacy. Providing what they see as personal information is one reason why email advertising is a non-starter with this demographic. Traditional Advertising Won't WorkAs it relates to ads, these generations want to be entertained, not sold. These target audiences will not engage passively with "traditional" advertising.A recent report titled The Everything Guide to Generation Z by Vision Critical, in partnership with research firm MARU/VCR&C, provides insights into the attitudes, behaviors and value of this generation.One of the key takeaways as it relates to Snap is that 69% of Generation Z finds ads disruptive. While the word "disruptive" can be thrown around by marketers in a good way (i.e., it changes the conventional way of thinking, forcing consumers to pay attention) that is not the context here. This generation, more so than even millennials, want ads to meet them where they are in a very organic manner.Yet, Erin Gade of Yes Lifestyle Marketing reported that one in five Generation Z consumers found Snapchat influential in their purchase decision. This requires a cross-channel model that is far different from banner ads and pop-up videos. In fact, in many cases the ads aren't ads at all.As someone who's worked in marketing agencies, I can confirm that many marketers are not open to new approaches. They want traditional "push" advertising and pre-roll messages because they're measurable. But they frequently don't look at or understand the metrics that matter. It's a soft-sell approach. The payoff is more intrinsic and less measurable. Snap Needs Ad Revenue to Reach ProfitabilityThe fact that Snap is not yet profitable is not a big deal for investors. The company is not expected to be profitable until 2023. However, that revenue growth is largely going to be dependent on the company's ability to monetize their advertising. InvestorPlace contributor Vince Martin wrote in August that Snap would require at least $1 billion in additional revenue to support its current valuation. The stock is already down about 10% from its recent highs. I expect that some investors will look to engage in profit taking as the year comes to an end.The argument for Snap stock is that their target audience is devoted to technology and loyally uses the app. But this is not a captive audience and they can't be marketed to as such.Growing their user base is not enough for Snap stock. For the company to really grow, they have to find a way to monetize that base. I'm not saying it can't be done; I'm just skeptical.As of this writing, Chris Markoch did not hold a position in any of the aforementioned securities. More From InvestorPlace * 2 Toxic Pot Stocks You Should Avoid * 10 Recession-Resistant Services Stocks to Buy * 7 Hot Penny Stocks to Consider Now * 7 Tech Stocks You Should Avoid Now The post Why Ia€™m Taking a Wait and See Approach on Snap Stock appeared first on InvestorPlace.

  • Financial Times

    Central banks should not issue digital currencies

    The appeal of highly volatile currencies backed by absolutely nothing but speculator faith was always going to be limited. To avoid the wild fluctuations common for conventional cryptocurrencies, stablecoins are backed by assets, allowing their values to be pegged to government-issued currencies such as dollars, euros and even the renminbi. The rise of such coins could be seen as a win for government currencies they are pegged to.

  • Europe’s Top Economies Reject Facebook’s Libra Cryptocurrency
    Market Realist

    Europe’s Top Economies Reject Facebook’s Libra Cryptocurrency

    Germany and France, Europe’s largest and third-largest economies, say they have no place for Facebook’s Libra cryptocurrency.

  • Is SQ Stock Ready to Bounce Back?
    InvestorPlace

    Is SQ Stock Ready to Bounce Back?

    Square (NYSE:SQ), the San Francisco based payment processor, had been on a roll. Since its initial IPO in November 2015 with the SQ stock price at $58, investors who got in early rode the price up to over $101 in September 2018. Since then, however, it has been an all-downhill roller coaster.Source: Jonathan Weiss / Shutterstock.com Square stock recently closed back down to the IPO price of $58, and may yet again test its all-time low of $49. The underlying technology for Square stock by all accounts is undoubtedly sound. The market may be cool on SQ stock, but customers like the service.Square has steady increased top-line revenues every year. In fact, from the pre-IPO days of the creation of Square by Twitter (NYSE:TWTR) founder Jack Dorsey back in 2011, revenues have increased more than 15-fold. However, Square stock has yet to generate positive net income.InvestorPlace - Stock Market News, Stock Advice & Trading Tips * 7 Tech Stocks You Should Avoid Now As the hard-pressed investors of Uber (NASDAQ:UBER) stock know all too well, dazzling technology and great top-line revenue growth are all swell. But if there is no positive net income in sight and losses keep growing by staggering amounts, there is no reason to hold the stock.Despite robust sales growth, just within days after reporting disappointing second-quarter earnings announced on Aug. 1st, Square stock dropped around 40%. Similarly, the shares of Visa (NYSE:V), MasterCard (NYSE:MA), and PayPal (NASDAQ:PYPL) - comparative payment processors - have also been struggling in the market.When it comes to the tech sector nowadays, investors are getting tired of talk and want to see some beef on the bones in terms of bottom line earnings. Or they vote with their feet.With the massive sell-off in SQ stock, will the bears finally back off?Here are two reasons why Square is now becoming a great value play in the FinTech sector. Free Stock Trades Will Drive New Revenues, Enhance SQ ValuationAccording to a recent report in Bloomberg, Square is in the initial stages of testing a new feature allowing users of its Cash App service to buy and sell listed U.S. equities for free. A free stock trading functionality would put Square into direct competition with Robinhood, an online broker launched as a smartphone app in 2014. Backed by the venture capital firm Sequoia Capital, Robinhood is valued at approximately $7.6 billion.Many skeptics will wonder what the point is about spending heavily to launch and maintain a free service. As many analysts of the online brokerage wars know all too well, free stock trades are akin to a bar offering free salty peanuts to customers. After eating the free peanuts, those customers soon pony up the cash to buy expensive drinks. The trading of stocks may be free, but everything else comes at a price.Robinhood, for example, will charge a premium for offering investors telephone advice, foreign stock transactions, interest on uninvested cash holdings, as well as interest on margin loans. Robinhood will also sell to a captive market other high margin financial products such as credit cards, insurance and auto loans. Similarly, for Square, offering users free stock trades will attract more users and drive more volume and thus revenues to their payment processing services.Offering free stock trades will not be the first free service for Square. In their recent earnings statement, Square noted that they offer their existing Cash App clients peer-to-peer cash transfer service for free as a marketing tool to drive new business. SQ Is Best in Class Infrastructure - And Getting BetterMobile payments processing is still a nascent industry just at the beginning of growth. According to the consulting firm McKinsey, the global payments industry is a $1.9-trillion business. Much like Amazon (NASDAQ:AMZN) and Twitter in the early years, Square admittedly is less concerned with profitability and far more concerned with building their engineering platform to compete and win in the market against the giants of the financial services industry.According to the most recent earnings release for the second quarter of 2019, product development expenses for Square stock were $174 million in the second quarter of 2019, up 52% year-over-year. This increase was driven primarily by costs related to engineering, data science, and technical design.In short, Square is spending heavily on technology to out-build and beat the competition for the future of the industry. Bottom Line on SQ StockThere is certainly no shortage of deep-pocketed competitors in the payment processing business. In fact, recent months have seen Facebook (NASDAQ:FB) and JP Morgan Chase (NYSE:JPM) announce major new investments in their payment solutions offering.Yet, Square stock has been showing a decent support level at the $50 to $52 range. Square stock represents a proven and solid value play in what is usually a risky and overvalued FinTech sector.At the time of writing, Theodore Kim, CFA, holds no position in any of the stocks mentioned above. More From InvestorPlace * 2 Toxic Pot Stocks You Should Avoid * 10 Recession-Resistant Services Stocks to Buy * 7 Hot Penny Stocks to Consider Now * 7 Tech Stocks You Should Avoid Now The post Is SQ Stock Ready to Bounce Back? appeared first on InvestorPlace.

  • Reuters

    UPDATE 1-ECB's Villeroy tells Facebook that Libra faces tough scrutiny

    European Central Bank board member Francois Villeroy de Galhau said on Tuesday that "stablecoins" like Facebook’s Libra highlight gaps in rules and the media giant's payments project faced a tough regulatory approach. Facebook's planned Libra is the most well-known of the stablecoins, cryptocurrencies backed by assets such as traditional money deposits, short-term government securities or gold. Facebook has said it will apply for a licence as a payments services operator in Switzerland, but this may not be comprehensive enough to satisfy regulators.