FMCC - Freddie Mac

Other OTC - Other OTC Delayed Price. Currency in USD
2.9000
+0.0700 (+2.47%)
At close: 3:59PM EST
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Previous Close2.8300
Open2.8500
Bid0.0000 x 0
Ask0.0000 x 0
Day's Range2.7800 - 2.9000
52 Week Range0.9800 - 4.0400
Volume2643693
Avg. Volume2,651,035
Market Cap1.9B
Beta (3Y Monthly)2.04
PE Ratio (TTM)N/A
EPS (TTM)-0.3390
Earnings DateOct 29, 2019 - Nov 4, 2019
Forward Dividend & YieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-Dividend Date2008-06-12
1y Target Est4.33
  • GlobeNewswire

    Freddie Mac: Benefits of Multifamily Green Improvements Go Beyond Environmental Impact

    MCLEAN, Va., Dec. 11, 2019 -- Freddie Mac (OTCQB: FMCC) today released a white paper detailing the important role green improvements play in preserving affordable, workforce.

  • GlobeNewswire

    Freddie Mac Prices $647 million Multifamily K-Deal, K-1514

    MCLEAN, Va., Dec. 09, 2019 -- Freddie Mac (OTCQB: FMCC) recently priced a new offering of Structured Pass-Through Certificates (K Certificates), which are multifamily.

  • Bloomberg

    Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac Make the 30-Year Mortgage Possible

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Thirty years is a very long time.Over three decades, economic conditions will change and change again. And so, in all likelihood, will a person’s circumstances. You might buy a house and then, a decade later, lose your job. Or you might gain a windfall and decide to move to a bigger, better home. Who can know what’s in store over that span of time?Which is why the 30-year fixed-rate mortgage is such an unusual loan. Banks in other countries(1) don’t offer 30-year fixed mortgages, because they entail too much risk: interest rate risk, prepayment risk and, gravest of all, credit risk — meaning the possibility that the borrower will default. In the U.S., by contrast, the 30-year fixed mortgage is such a staple that nearly 90% of Americans who apply for a home loan want one.I suspect you already know what makes the 30-year fixed mortgage possible in the U.S.: Those infamous “government sponsored enterprises,” Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac,(2) publicly traded companies created by Congress to help make housing more available to middle-class Americans. Fannie and Freddie accomplish this by doing three things. First, they buy up mortgages from banks, thus freeing up capital so that banks can write yet more mortgages — and help more people gain the American Dream of homeownership.Second, they bundle mortgages into bonds, and sell them to investors (hence the term “mortgage-backed securities”). Finally, they assume the credit risk for the securitized mortgages they bundle. That is, they guarantee those mortgages against the possibility of a default. Without that guarantee, the 30-year fixed mortgage simply wouldn’t exist. No bank would be willing to assume that risk themselves.For the past 11 years, Fannie and Freddie have been in “conservatorship” — wards of the U.S. government. They were taken over by the Treasury Department in September 2008, nine days before the bankruptcy of Lehman Brothers Holdings Inc. Having foolishly — and belatedly — jumped into subprime mortgages, Fannie and Freddie were facing big losses. Then-Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson feared that if they collapsed, the entire U.S. housing market would collapse along with them.Ever since, policy makers in Washington have called for a reduction in the role of the federal government, saying that taxpayers shouldn’t be on the hook if Fannie and Freddie falter again. Indeed, many Republicans believe that Fannie and Freddie should be killed off entirely, and that housing finance should be in private hands. The big banks, irked by the power Fannie and Freddie had for decades over the securitization market, have also agitated for a diminished role for the GSEs.Sure enough, in 2013, President Barack Obama called for Fannie and Freddie to be wound down, and for the federal role in the mortgage market to be minimized. More recently, the current Treasury Department unveiled a plan that would solve the Fannie-Freddie issue in a different way. It wants to privatize the two companies and eliminate the guarantee, while also imposing a slew of new regulatory controls to prevent another taxpayer bailout like the one that took place in 2008. (The Trump administration plan is still pretty vague.)To which I can only ask: What’s the point?What spurs this thought is the news, which the Wall Street Journal broke a few weeks ago, that a number of major institutional investors, including BlackRock Inc. and Fidelity Investments, had met over the summer with administration officials to plead with them not to do away with the guarantee. The investors said that “any move to privatize Fannie and Freddie should include an explicit guarantee of the $5 trillion in mortgage-backed securities they issue, according to people familiar with the matter,” the Journal wrote.The fact that these big investors felt strongly enough to meet with the White House suggests a cold, hard truth: For all the talk about minimizing the federal role, the housing market simply cannot function without that federal guarantee. And only Fannie and Freddie are in a position to supply it.Here’s another question: Why do you think Fannie and Freddie remain in government control, even though every Treasury secretary since Timothy Geithner has vowed to end the conservatorship? One reason is that, try as they might, government officials simply haven’t been able to devise a way to maintain the 30-year fixed mortgage without Fannie and Freddie. Another is that ever since the financial crisis, Fannie and Freddie have single-handedly (double-handedly?) kept the housing market alive.It’s true, as its critics say, that the government had to hand the two companies $187 billion to keep them afloat. (This was in part because they were so thinly capitalized.) But once they recovered, they paid back $250 billion, giving the government a healthy return. (It was not such a good deal for Fannie and Freddie’s shareholders; that $250 billion was profit the government claimed for itself.)What Fannie and Freddie have mostly lost these past 11 years is the power they once had over the other players in the market. If the banks had wanted to play a bigger role during that time, the GSEs couldn’t have stopped them. But they didn’t — because they needed that guarantee.Any objective observer, I think, would have to concede that Fannie and Freddie have done a very good job since the 2008 crisis. They’ve done so without worrying about shareholders, or market share, or year-over-year profit gains. What got Fannie and Freddie in trouble was not the government mandate, but their public company impulses. In the years before the crisis hit, they abandoned their historically sound underwriting standards because they were losing market share to the mortgage originators that were writing all those subprime loans that came a cropper when the bubble burst. As government wards, Fannie and Freddie no longer have any incentive to act foolishly.So I ask again: What’s the point? Why does the government continue to try to wind down Fannie and Freddie, or privatize them, or whatever, when they’re working just fine the way they are? If Fannie and Freddie are going to supply a government guarantee on mortgages, they might as well be part of the government. Letting them loose is only going create temptations — and unduly complicate the housing finance system.They say that if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it. Conservatorship or not, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac ain’t broke.(1) The only other country I know of that offers a 30-year fixed mortgage is Denmark.(2) Fannie Mae’s official name is the Federal National Mortgage Association. Freddie Mac’s is the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp.To contact the author of this story: Joe Nocera at jnocera3@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Stacey Shick at sshick@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Joe Nocera is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering business. He has written business columns for Esquire, GQ and the New York Times, and is the former editorial director of Fortune. His latest project is the Bloomberg-Wondery podcast "The Shrink Next Door."For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • U.S Mortgage Rates Hold Steady as Geopolitics and Stats Send Mixed Signals
    FX Empire

    U.S Mortgage Rates Hold Steady as Geopolitics and Stats Send Mixed Signals

    Mortgage rates were flat in the last week. That’s unlikely to be repeated, however, with the FED in action on Wednesday and Trump every present.

  • Mortgage rates hold steady, but economists say don’t expect that to last
    MarketWatch

    Mortgage rates hold steady, but economists say don’t expect that to last

    Mortgage rates didn’t budge much over the last week amid mixed signals as to the economy’s strength as the holiday season kicked into full drive. The 30-year fixed-rate mortgage averaged 3.68% during the week ending Dec. 5, unchanged from the previous week, Freddie Mac (FMCC) reported Thursday. Compared to a year ago, mortgage rates were more than a full percentage point lower.

  • GlobeNewswire

    Freddie Mac Prices $1.1 Billion Multifamily K-Deal, K-102

    MCLEAN, Va., Dec. 06, 2019 -- Freddie Mac (OTCQB: FMCC) recently priced a new offering of Structured Pass-Through Certificates (K Certificates), which are backed by underlying.

  • GlobeNewswire

    Anthony N. Renzi Appointed as CEO of Common Securitization Solutions

    Fannie Mae (FNMA/OTCQB) and Freddie Mac (FMCC/OTCQB) today jointly announced the appointment of Anthony N. Renzi as Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of Common Securitization Solutions, LLC (CSS), effective December 2, 2019. Mr. Renzi succeeds David Applegate who announced earlier this year that he would be stepping down as CSS CEO by year-end.

  • Moody's

    Provident Funding Mortgage Trust 2019-1 -- Moody's assigns definitive ratings to Prime RMBS issued by Provident Funding Mortgage Trust 2019-1

    Moody's Investors Service ("Moody's") has assigned definitive ratings to 18 classes of residential mortgage-backed securities (RMBS) issued by Provident Funding Mortgage Trust 2019-1 (Provident 2019-1). Provident 2019-1 is the first transaction entirely backed by loans originated by the sponsor, Provident Funding Associates, L.P. (Provident Funding). Provident 2019-1, a common law trust formed under the laws of the State of New York, is a securitization of agency-eligible mortgage loans originated and serviced by Provident Funding, a California limited partnership (corporate family rating B1; senior unsecured B2) and will be the first transaction for which Provident Funding is the sole originator and servicer.

  • DoubleLine on why Fannie, Freddie won't be released from conservatorship soon
    Yahoo Finance

    DoubleLine on why Fannie, Freddie won't be released from conservatorship soon

    Releasing the GSEs from conservatorship too soon might impact the economy, says one of DoubleLine's top fund managers.

  • Moody's

    MHFA-Homeownership Finance Bonds (MBS Prog.) -- Moody's assigns Aaa rating to MN HFA's Homeownership Fin. Bds. 2019 H; outlook stable

    Rating Action: Moody's assigns Aaa rating to MN HFA's Homeownership Fin. New York, December 05, 2019 -- Moody's Investors Service has assigned a Aaa rating to the proposed $54 million of Minnesota Housing Finance Agency's ("Minnesota Housing" or the "Agency") Homeownership Finance Bonds, 2019 Series H (Mortgage-Backed Securities Pass-Through Program) (the "2019 Bonds"). The Aaa ratings on all outstanding Homeownership Finance Bonds have also been maintained.

  • GlobeNewswire

    Freddie Mac Prices $599 Million Multifamily K-Deal, K-C07

    MCLEAN, Va., Dec. 05, 2019 -- Freddie Mac (OTCQB: FMCC) recently priced a K-C Series offering of Structured Pass-Through Certificates (K Certificates), which are multifamily.

  • GlobeNewswire

    Mortgage Rates Hold Steady

    MCLEAN, Va., Dec. 05, 2019 -- Freddie Mac (OTCQB: FMCC) today released the results of its Primary Mortgage Market Survey® (PMMS®), showing that the 30-year fixed-rate mortgage.

  • Barrons.com

    The Maximum Mortgage Limit Increased for the Fourth Straight Year. Why That Could Be a Bad Sign.

    The Federal Housing Finance Agency has raised the maximum conforming-loan limit to as high as $765,600 in some markets.

  • GlobeNewswire

    Freddie Mac Research Shows What It Takes to Offer Affordable Housing in High-Cost, High Opportunity Markets

    Freddie Mac (FMCC) released a Duty to Serve white paper detailing how unique financing structures allowed for affordable rents in the high-cost metro areas of Honolulu, Hawaii; San Jose, California; and Portland, Oregon. The three properties studied are in high opportunity areas, which offer unique social and economic benefits to residents but are often constrained by high land and construction costs, lack of buildable land and zoning restrictions.

  • Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac will soon let borrowers take out mortgages over $500K
    MarketWatch

    Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac will soon let borrowers take out mortgages over $500K

    The Federal Housing Finance Agency has raised the maximum conforming loan limit for the fourth straight year.

  • Moody's

    Freddie Mac Structured Pass-Through Certificates (SPCs), Series K-101 -- Moody's assigns definitive ratings to eight CMBS REMIC classes of FREMF 2019-K101 and five SPC Classes of Freddie Mac SPCs, Series K-101

    Rating Action: Moody's assigns definitive ratings to eight CMBS REMIC classes of FREMF 2019- K101 and five SPC Classes of Freddie Mac SPCs, Series K-101. Global Credit Research- 02 Dec 2019. Approximately ...

  • U.S Mortgage Rates Rise but only Marginally
    FX Empire

    U.S Mortgage Rates Rise but only Marginally

    Mortgage rates rose but remain well below 4% levels that will likely continue to fuel demand…

  • GlobeNewswire

    Freddie Mac November Forecast: Housing Market Continues to Stand Firm

    According to Freddie Mac’s (FMCC) November Forecast, the housing market will continue to stand firm as home sales rise to 6.0 million for 2019 before increasing to 6.1 million for 2020. “The economy has seen increased volatility in November as hopes for a favorable resolution to the trade dispute have recently waned,” said Sam Khater, Freddie Mac’s Chief Economist. The house price forecast is expected to be 3.2 percent in 2019 and 2.9 percent in 2020.

  • Mortgage rates increased over the last week — and that could put a damper on the housing market
    MarketWatch

    Mortgage rates increased over the last week — and that could put a damper on the housing market

    The real-estate market has been slow to respond to the low interest rate environment, and rates appear to be on an upward trajectory.

  • GlobeNewswire

    Freddie Mac Settles $1.3 Billion SLST Securitization

    Freddie Mac (FMCC) today announced the settlement of the third Seasoned Loans Structured Transaction Trust (SLST) offering of 2019—a securitization of approximately $1.3 billion including both guaranteed senior and non-guaranteed subordinate securities backed by a pool of seasoned re-performing loans (RPLs). The SLST program is a fundamental part of Freddie Mac's seasoned loan offerings which reduce less-liquid assets in its mortgage-related investments portfolio and shed credit and market risk via economically reasonable transactions. Freddie Mac SLST Series 2019-3 includes approximately $1.069 billion in guaranteed senior certificates and approximately $257 million in non-guaranteed subordinate certificates.

  • GlobeNewswire

    Mortgage Rates Increase Slightly

    Freddie Mac (FMCC) today released the results of its Primary Mortgage Market Survey® (PMMS®), showing that the 30-year fixed-rate mortgage (FRM) averaged 3.68 percent, increasing slightly since last week. “Following a decline in the first nine months of 2019, mortgage rates have traded narrower during the last two months with a modest drift upward due to an improved economic outlook,” said Sam Khater, Freddie Mac’s Chief Economist.

  • GlobeNewswire

    Freddie Mac Issues Monthly Volume Summary for October 2019

    MCLEAN, Va., Nov. 26, 2019 -- Freddie Mac (OTCQB: FMCC) announced today that it issued its Monthly Volume Summary for October 2019, which provides information on Freddie Mac’s.

  • GlobeNewswire

    Mark H. Bloom to Join Freddie Mac Board of Directors

    MCLEAN, Va., Nov. 26, 2019 -- Freddie Mac (OTCQB: FMCC) today announced that Mark H. Bloom has been elected to its Board of Directors effective November 25, 2019. Currently,.

  • Moody's

    Provident Funding Mortgage Trust 2019-1 -- Moody's assigns provisional ratings to Prime RMBS issued by Provident Funding Mortgage Trust 2019-1

    Moody's Investors Service ("Moody's") has assigned provisional ratings to 18 classes of residential mortgage-backed securities (RMBS) issued by Provident Funding Mortgage Trust 2019-1 (Provident 2019-1). Provident 2019-1 is the first transaction entirely backed by loans originated by the sponsor, Provident Funding Associates, L.P. (Provident Funding). Provident 2019-1, a common law trust formed under the laws of the State of New York, is a securitization of agency-eligible mortgage loans originated and serviced by Provident Funding, a California limited partnership (corporate family rating B1; senior unsecured B2) and will be the first transaction for which Provident Funding is the sole originator and servicer.

  • DoubleLine's Hsu on why Fannie and Freddie won't be released from conservatorship anytime soon
    Yahoo Finance Video

    DoubleLine's Hsu on why Fannie and Freddie won't be released from conservatorship anytime soon

    Yahoo Finance Correspondent Julia La Roche joins DoubleLine's Andrew Hsu, the co-portfolio manager of the DoubleLine Total Return Bond Fund, to discuss the future of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, opportunities in structured products, and infrastructure. The $150 billion DoubleLine Capital will celebrate its 10th anniversary this month.