FMCKM - Freddie Mac

Other OTC - Other OTC Delayed Price. Currency in USD
10.44
+0.09 (+0.87%)
At close: 3:56PM EDT
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Previous Close10.35
Open10.40
Bid0.00 x 0
Ask0.00 x 0
Day's Range10.30 - 10.45
52 Week Range4.51 - 15.23
Volume15,806
Avg. Volume64,671
Market Cap8.4B
Beta (3Y Monthly)0.69
PE Ratio (TTM)N/A
EPS (TTM)-0.25
Earnings DateN/A
Forward Dividend & YieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-Dividend Date2008-06-12
1y Target EstN/A
Trade prices are not sourced from all markets
  • U.S. taxpayers at risk for homes threatened by climate change
    CBS News Videos

    U.S. taxpayers at risk for homes threatened by climate change

    Wall Street firms are offloading mortgages to Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac for vulnerable coastal properties.

  • Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac Allowed to Boost Capital Cushions
    Bloomberg

    Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac Allowed to Boost Capital Cushions

    Sep.30 -- Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac will be allowed to boost their capital by billions of dollars to protect against potential losses, a key step in the Trump administration’s push to free the mortgage giants from U.S. control. Bloomberg's Jesse Westbrook has more on "Bloomberg Markets."

  • FX Empire

    U.S Mortgage Bounce as Geopolitical Risk Abates

    Mortgage rates were on the rise in the week ending 17th October. 30-year fixed rates rose by 12 basis points to 3.69%, reversing an 8 basis point fall in the week prior. In spite of the uptick, 30-year rates held close to levels last seen in early November of 2016, according to figures released by Freddie Mac.

  • Benzinga

    These Were The Most Active Securities On OTC Markets In September

    A British tobacco company, Dutch paint company, California-based dermatological company, and Maryland-based regional bank were among the securities that experienced the largest trading volume increases ...

  • Barrons.com

    Mortgage Rates Drop Again — Sparking More Interest in Home-Loan Refinancing

    While the decline in rates has prompted many home owners to refinance their loans, it may not be enough to create a major uptick in home-buying activity

  • FX Empire

    U.S Mortgage Rates Ease Back to Support Refinancing

    Mortgage rates were on the slide, according to Freddie Mac, with a combination of lower rates and a strong labor market supporting mortgage applications.

  • Mortgage rates drop once again — sparking more interest in loan refinancing
    MarketWatch

    Mortgage rates drop once again — sparking more interest in loan refinancing

    While the decline in rates has prompted many home owners to refinance their loans, it may not be enough to create a major uptick in home-buying activity.

  • FX Empire

    U.S Mortgage Rates Hold Steady in Economic Data Deluge

    In spite of a string of disappointing stats from the U.S, mortgage rates held steady. More downside could be on the horizon, however.

  • Mortgage rates remain near recent lows — why that may not be enough to push more people to buy homes
    MarketWatch

    Mortgage rates remain near recent lows — why that may not be enough to push more people to buy homes

    Economists argue that low rates will continue to prop up the housing market as the economy slows down, but it’s not clear how long that will last.

  • Fannie, Freddie Allowed to Boost Capital Buffers by Billions
    Bloomberg

    Fannie, Freddie Allowed to Boost Capital Buffers by Billions

    (Bloomberg) -- Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac will be allowed to boost their capital by billions of dollars to protect against potential losses, a key step in the Trump administration’s push to free the mortgage giants from U.S. control.Fannie will be permitted to retain earnings until its capital buffer hits $25 billion, while Freddie will be allowed to hold $20 billion, the Treasury Department and the Federal Housing Finance Agency announced Monday. Last year, Fannie reported net income of $16 billion and Freddie made $9.2 billion, signaling it could take more than a year for the companies to reach the administration’s new goal.Treasury and FHFA, Fannie and Freddie’s regulator, also committed to making more changes to the bailout agreements that were struck after the companies were rescued with taxpayer funds at the height of the 2008 financial crisis.The agencies said they may make additional tweaks to Fannie and Freddie’s capital structures, as well. The moves are all part of an effort -- outlined in a plan released by Treasury earlier this month -- to end the companies’ decade long conservatorships and return them to the private market.Read More: Trump Fannie-Freddie Plan Urges Ending Decade of U.S. Rule“These modifications are an important step toward implementing Treasury’s recommended reforms that will define a limited role for the federal government in the housing finance system and protect taxpayers against future bailouts,” Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said in a statement.Fannie rose 3.3% to $3.80 in New York Trading, while Freddie gained 3.2% to $3.59.Monday’s changes, which have been telegraphed by FHFA Director Mark Calabria and Mnuchin for weeks, mark some of the biggest for Fannie and Freddie since they were made wards of the state. Under the companies’ current bailout agreements, they are restricted from holding more than $3 billion in capital apiece, much less than they would need to survive outside government control. Instead of retaining earnings, they send their profits each quarter to the Treasury -- a process known as the net worth sweep.But even at the levels outlined in Monday’s statement, Fannie and Freddie would still be far short of the capital cushions that most everyone agrees are required. Calabria and Mnuchin have both said the companies will need to raise private capital, potentially through a share sale. One way to interpret Monday’s announcement is as a suspension of the net worth sweep.With much still to be sorted out, it’s unclear how soon hedge funds and other investors that own Fannie and Freddie stock might make windfalls on their stakes. And if a Democrat beats President Donald Trump in the 2020 election next November, Calabria and Mnuchin’s plans would likely be scrapped.‘Significant Challenges’“There are still some significant challenges to recapitalization," KBW analyst Brian Gardner said in a note earlier this month. “Recapitalization is unlikely to happen until after the 2020 election and then it will obviously be dependent to a large degree on the outcome of the election."Still, Fannie and Freddie shares have rallied this year on Wall Street optimism that the Trump administration is making progress.Fannie and Freddie don’t make loans. Instead they keep the mortgage market humming by buying loans from banks and other lenders and packaging them into securities. Bond investors consider the companies’ mortgage securities to be extremely safe because they have guarantees in case homebuyers default on their loans. The process provides liquidity for home purchases and keeps borrowing rates low.Read More: Fannie and Freddie Died But Were Reborn, ProfitablyThe government took control of Fannie and Freddie when the housing market tanked in 2008, eventually injecting them with more than $187 billion. Their bailout agreements originally called for Fannie and Freddie to pay 10% dividends each quarter to the Treasury, but in 2012 the government changed the terms to sweep nearly all of the companies’ profits. In 2017, Treasury and FHFA amended that agreement to allow the companies to retain $3 billion in earnings apiece.Under the agreement announced Monday, the amount of a senior preferred stock of Fannie and Freddie that is owned by Treasury will increase by $22 billion and $17 billion respectively, according to the statement.The change announced Monday in some way kicks the can down the road until FHFA and Treasury are prepared make more sweeping changes. Calabria has indicated that the process of ending the companies’ conservatorships will take some time. In a Bloomberg Television interview earlier this month, he predicted that the companies probably won’t be ready to seek private capital until early 2021.“The enterprises are leveraged nearly 1,000-to-1, ensuring they would fail during an economic downturn -- exposing taxpayers once again,” Calabria said in a Monday statement. The revised agreement with Treasury is “an important milestone on the path to reform.”(Updates with closing share prices in sixth paragraph.)To contact the reporter on this story: Elizabeth Dexheimer in Washington at edexheimer@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Jesse Westbrook at jwestbrook1@bloomberg.net, Gregory MottFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Reuters

    UPDATE 1-U.S. allows Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac to start keeping profits

    Housing giants Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac will be permitted to retain a total of $45 billion in earnings going forward, as an initial step toward exiting government control. In a joint statement released Monday, the Treasury Department and Federal Housing Finance Agency, which regulates the pair, said the new policy will allow the two to rebuild capital reserves. "This letter agreement between Treasury and FHFA...is an important milestone on the path to reform," said FHFA Director Mark Calabria in a statement.

  • MarketWatch

    Fannie, Freddie can hold more capital, per Treasury-FHFA agreement

    Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac , the mortgage guarantors under government control, will hold higher levels of capital, according to an agreement between the Treasury Department and their regulator. The enterprises had been required to send all their profits to Treasury after a 2012 agreement, but an amendment in 2017 allowed them to retain a slim capital buffer of $3 billion each. The additional capital is one of several steps recommended by Treasury as a way forward for the housing finance system and may be a precursor to a new capital raise for the enterprises. Fannie will retain $25 billion and Freddie $20 billion. Shares of both companies are up more than 200% in the year to date.

  • FX Empire

    U.S Mortgage Rates Fall as Geopolitical Risk Hits Yields

    Mortgage rates hit reverse once more as geopolitical risk drove demand for U.S Treasuries. Expect more movement in the week ahead…

  • Reuters

    UPDATE 1-U.S. mortgage rates fall in latest week -Freddie Mac

    U.S. mortgage rates fell broadly in latest week in step with the lower bond yields, prompting expectations that lower borrowing costs would support domestic home sales and construction, Freddie Mac said on Thursday. Interest rates on 30-year fixed-rate mortgages fell to 3.64% in the week ended Sept. 26, down from 3.73% the prior week and from 4.72% a year earlier, the home finance agency said. Benchmark 10-year Treasury yields declined nearly 7 basis points last week as the Federal Reserve lowered key lending rates for a second time in 2019.

  • Mortgage rates fall slightly, giving the housing market more room to grow
    MarketWatch

    Mortgage rates fall slightly, giving the housing market more room to grow

    Mortgage rates moved lower after two straight weeks of increases, which should allow the housing market to remain strong as we shift into the typically slower fall months. The 30-year fixed-rate mortgage averaged 3.64% during the week ending Sept. 26, falling nine basis points from the previous week, Freddie Mac (FMCC)  reported Thursday. In 2019, mortgage rates have increased only 11 times on a weekly basis.

  • Benzinga

    Tilson: Fannie Mae 'Reminds Me Of My Best Investment Ever'

    Since former hedge fund manager Whitney Tilson made a bullish call on Federal National Mortgage Association (OTC: FNMA) and Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp (OTC: FMCC) on Sept. 5, the two stocks are each up more than 40%. Since 2012, every cent of earnings by Fannie and Freddie have gone directly to the Treasury as part of their ongoing conservatorship. Earlier this month, however, an appellate court overturned a previous ruling upholding the legality of the Treasury’s “net worth sweep” of Fannie and Freddie’s profits.

  • Mortgage rates increase, just as home-sales activity regains momentum
    MarketWatch

    Mortgage rates increase, just as home-sales activity regains momentum

    Mortgage rates rose on a weekly basis for the second week in a row, potentially threatening to put a damper on home sales just as the real-estate market’s outlook was brightening. The 30-year fixed-rate mortgage averaged 3.73% during the week ending Sept. 19, rising 13 basis points from the previous week, Freddie Mac (FMCC)  reported Thursday. The 15-year fixed-rate mortgage increased 12 basis points to an average of 3.21%, according to Freddie Mac.

  • FX Empire

    U.S Mortgage Rates Rally Supported by Housing Sector Data

    Mortgage rates were on the rise last week, as housing sector data impressed. Even a FED rate cut failed to pin back the surge…

  • Barrons.com

    Mortgage Rates Increase, Just as Home-Sales Activity Regains Momentum

    Mortgage rates rose on a weekly basis for the second week in a row, potentially threatening to put a damper on home sales just as the real-estate market’s outlook was brightening.

  • FHFA says Fannie and Freddie must direct over one-third of multifamily loans towards affordable housing
    MarketWatch

    FHFA says Fannie and Freddie must direct over one-third of multifamily loans towards affordable housing

    Over a third of the multifamily loans the two firms purchase must now be directed toward affordable housing.