FSLR - First Solar, Inc.

NasdaqGS - NasdaqGS Real Time Price. Currency in USD
67.07
+1.32 (+2.01%)
At close: 4:00PM EDT
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Previous Close65.75
Open66.00
Bid59.50 x 1100
Ask69.00 x 900
Day's Range65.91 - 67.90
52 Week Range36.51 - 69.24
Volume1,799,685
Avg. Volume1,029,121
Market Cap7.069B
Beta (3Y Monthly)1.27
PE Ratio (TTM)296.77
EPS (TTM)0.23
Earnings DateOct 23, 2019 - Oct 28, 2019
Forward Dividend & YieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-Dividend DateN/A
1y Target Est77.09
Trade prices are not sourced from all markets
  • GlobeNewswire

    First Solar Evolves U.S. EPC Delivery Approach with Third-Party Execution Model

    First Solar, Inc. (FSLR) today announced that it is transitioning away from its internal Engineering, Procurement and Construction (EPC) execution model in the United States, and moving towards leveraging the capabilities of trusted EPC partners. The transition to leveraging third-party EPC services will occur through the rest of 2019 and will not impact any projects under construction and slated for delivery this year. This evolution will allow the Company to solidify its competitiveness and position as America’s leading solar module manufacturer.

  • First Solar Stock Drops as Solar Power Grows
    InvestorPlace

    First Solar Stock Drops as Solar Power Grows

    If you bought First Solar (NASDAQ:FSLR) stock as a way to play the future of solar energy, you're probably frustrated. Over the last five years First Solar stock is down almost 8%. Sales have been declining and losses are piling up. Operating cash flow has usually been negative. Cash on hand is declining.Source: Shutterstock Reading First Solar's numbers, you might think solar energy is a myth. It's not.The amount of solar energy in America's energy grid rose 30% in 2018. It's on pace for another gain this year, despite the rolling back of financial incentives.InvestorPlace - Stock Market News, Stock Advice & Trading TipsThere are now over 2 million solar installations in the U.S., and that's expected to double over the next five years. First Solar's Problem is DeflationThe problem is deflation. The problem is China. First Solar's share of the global market is down to 3%. The big players are all Chinese companies, like JinkoSolar (NYSE:JKS), privately held JA Solar and Trina Solar, along with Canadian Solar (NASDAQ:CSIQ).Solar is like open-source software because the biggest benefits go to the users, not the developers. * 7 CBD Stocks to Buy That Are Still Worth Your Investment Dollars Solar panel prices keep declining, and solar panels keep getting more efficient. Canadian Solar now has a panel that claims conversion efficiency of nearly 23%. A startup, Solaria, is at 20%. First Solar is also at 22%. Solar efficiency could increase even faster, but the poor financial results for existing players mean research funding is drying up.Solar must also compete with wind in the renewable energy market, even though they're complementary, since wind supplies peak at night and solar during the day. Still, wind has been taking the prizes. Wind now represents 6.5% of the U.S. electrical grid. It is below the levelized cost of energy from natural gas.Then there's efficiency, which only shows up in consumption statistics. Electricity demand remains stubbornly stable, even with electric cars appearing on many roads, and even with increased demand for air conditioning. There's a Growing Thumb on CostsWhile renewables still represent less than 10% of the U.S. energy grid, their economic models aren't based on burning anything. Once a solar panel or wind turbine is in production, it keeps producing. Besides its initial costs, a solar panel or wind turbine just implies maintenance costs. By contrast, oil and natural gas aren't really energy. They're commodities that we burn to create energy.Recent attacks on Saudi oil installations made little difference to the market. The U.S. has 700 million barrels of oil, a nearly two-year supply, in storage. Saudi Arabia has another 190 million barrels. It's mostly there for oil-storage trade -- the practice of purchasing oil at a lower price and holding it in storage until prices increase.The world, in short, is awash in energy, from all sources. All players are struggling to stay afloat against the continuing threat of deflation. The Bottom Line on First Solar StockPresident Donald Trump's administration has done all it can to boost the oil patch and discourage renewables.Yet every time a solar panel goes on a roof, demand is taken out of the market, permanently. This doesn't mean solar panel makers are a good investment, as First Solar proves. The market is going to government-supported panel makers in China.First Solar manufactures its panels in Malaysia, Vietnam and even Ohio. The company is wisely focused on the utility business. Here, big facilities keep costs low. Low costs from scaling mean there's more business than in the residential market, where each installation requires its own permits.That doesn't mean I'm buying First Solar stock. I'm just glad someone is.Dana Blankenhorn is a financial and technology journalist. He is the author of the mystery thriller, The Reluctant Detective Finds Her Family, available at the Amazon Kindle store. Write him at danablankenhorn@gmail.com or follow him on Twitter at @danablankenhorn. As of this writing he owned no shares in companies mentioned in this article. More From InvestorPlace * 2 Toxic Pot Stocks You Should Avoid * 7 CBD Stocks to Buy That Are Still Worth Your Investment Dollars * 5 Stocks to Buy With Great Charts * 5 Goldman Sachs Stocks to Buy with Over 20% Upside Potential The post First Solar Stock Drops as Solar Power Grows appeared first on InvestorPlace.

  • Benzinga

    2 Solar Stocks Among Our Top Charts To Watch

    Solar stocks rallied Tuesday amid instability over Mid-East oil, with two of them among our top charts to watch. First Solar, Inc . (NASDAQ: FSLR ) jumped $2.38 to $65.82 on 1.5 million shares, or 1 1/2 ...

  • ReneSola's (SOL) Earnings & Revenues Beat Estimates in Q2
    Zacks

    ReneSola's (SOL) Earnings & Revenues Beat Estimates in Q2

    Solid operations drove ReneSola's (SOL) results in second-quarter 2019.

  • NIMBYs Shoot Down Green Projects Next Door While Planet Burns
    Bloomberg

    NIMBYs Shoot Down Green Projects Next Door While Planet Burns

    (Bloomberg) -- People love renewable power projects. Just not the one next door.While states from New York to Nevada want to get most of their power from solar plants and wind farms, residents are balking at living near green projects. And unlike opposition to fossil fuels due to concerns over pollution and contamination, the hostility toward clean power is largely driven by aesthetics and property values.Rows of solar panels threaten to mar pristine vistas, while fears are rising among local residents that towering wind turbines will ruin the bucolic nature of their rural towns and drive down home prices. It’s the latest iteration of a longstanding dilemma: People want projects built for the public good —s uch as affordable housing or roads and power lines — but don’t want to be near them.“There’s a reason people live in communities like this,” said Pamela Atwater, president of a citizens’ group in upstate New York fighting a proposed wind farm on the Lake Ontario shore. “It’s a big visual impact, a big noise impact. It would change the nature, the character of where we live.”As large projects proliferate across the country, such worries are dimming the green glow that once surrounded an industry built on the promise of saving the world. For instance, supervisors for the largest county in California — a state that has committed to going carbon-free by 2045 — voted in February to block new renewable facilities near many rural desert communities. San Bernardino County saw a spate of plant construction in the last decade, and some longtime residents suddenly found their views of the desert transformed by fields of panels, said County Supervisor Robert Lovingood. “We believe in this industry, but it’s a balance,” Lovingood said, adding that the new regulations still leave plenty of room for development in a county that’s larger than Connecticut, Massachusetts and Rhode Island combined. “We don’t have to disturb more pristine desert,” he said.In New York, legislators passed a climate change plan in June calling for all of the state’s electricity to come from emissions-free sources by 2040. And yet, two upstate wind farm proposals stalled this year, one in the face of determined resistance from Atwater’s citizens’ group, the other on concerns it would threaten a bald eagle nest.“Companies are learning that the halo effect of building solar and wind projects isn’t necessarily enough to protect them from backlash from NIMBYs,” said Alicia Rivera, spokeswoman for renewable developer RES Ltd., referring to the “Not in my backyard” sentiment that has long fueled opposition to big infrastructure projects.Labeling opponents NIMBYs, however, does nothing to win them over. “Bottom line: They think local people just need to become more educated,” Atwater said. “That doesn’t fly very well.” Land-intensive and highly visible, individual solar and wind projects have often generated friction with potential neighbors. The pushback may be more noticeable now than, say, 10 years ago, simply because more projects are being proposed in more states, affecting more communities.“Maybe the easy places for these things to go have been taken,” said Cullen Howe, a senior renewable energy advocate for the Natural Resources Defense Council. “Oftentimes, the places these things are now being sited are closer to residential areas, so there’s going to be a greater number of people affected.”After residents raised concerns about their property values, a proposed NextEra Energy Inc. wind farm fell short of winning approval from Reno County commissioners in Kansas in June. Nebraska passed a law in May making it easier for land owners to challenge in court new transmission lines for wind farms. Renewable developer RES has dealt with its fair share of backlash. In April, the company canceled its Summit Lake Wind project, a proposed 130-megawatt wind farm in L’Anse Township, Michigan. RES said the decision was due to ongoing delays in the planning process, which made the project unworkable.Summit Lake faced resistance over fears that the wind turbines would spoil wilderness and discourage tourism on a quiet stretch of the Lake Superior shore. The project site, next to the L’Anse Indian Reservation, also raised concerns among the Keweenaw Bay Indian Community that the turbines would harm their ability to fish and hunt in the area.The company also canceled plans for a 600 MW wind farm in northern Indiana in September 2018. The Harvest Wind project had received pushback from the local communities in Cass and Miami counties that were concerned about property rights and safety issues. Still, the company has also met with success. In December 2018, it finished a 80-megawatt wind project in upstate New York and in March broke ground on a solar facility in Georgia.“I think people are right to ask questions about what it means to have a wind farm in a community,” said Paul Copleman, a spokesman for Avangrid Renewables, which last year canceled a wind farm in New York state. “It’s our responsibility to do our best to explain the science, explain what it’s going to mean and convey those benefits.”This story is part of Covering Climate Now, a global collaboration of more than 220 news outlets to highlight climate change.  \--With assistance from Hannah Recht and Christopher Cannon.To contact the authors of this story: David R Baker in San Francisco at dbaker116@bloomberg.netMillicent Dent in New York at mdent13@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Lynn Doan at ldoan6@bloomberg.net, Pratish NarayananFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • CSIQ vs. FSLR: Which Stock Should Value Investors Buy Now?
    Zacks

    CSIQ vs. FSLR: Which Stock Should Value Investors Buy Now?

    CSIQ vs. FSLR: Which Stock Is the Better Value Option?

  • Where Could First Solar Stock Go from Here?
    Market Realist

    Where Could First Solar Stock Go from Here?

    Almost all the solar stocks have had a fantastic run so far this year, and First Solar (FSLR) is no exception. FSLR stock is up more than 45% year-to-date.

  • 3 Charts That Suggest Solar Stocks Are Headed Lower
    Investopedia

    3 Charts That Suggest Solar Stocks Are Headed Lower

    The break below a key trendline on the chart of the TAN ETF suggests that the solar sector could be gearing up for a move lower.

  • Should First Solar, Inc. (NASDAQ:FSLR) Focus On Improving This Fundamental Metric?
    Simply Wall St.

    Should First Solar, Inc. (NASDAQ:FSLR) Focus On Improving This Fundamental Metric?

    Many investors are still learning about the various metrics that can be useful when analysing a stock. This article is...

  • 3 Top Energy Stocks to Buy in September
    Motley Fool

    3 Top Energy Stocks to Buy in September

    Investors looking at the sector should check out these players in oilfield services, solar panels, and renewable energy production.

  • The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: First Solar, Enviva, Renewable Energy and TerraForm
    Zacks

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: First Solar, Enviva, Renewable Energy and TerraForm

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: First Solar, Enviva, Renewable Energy and TerraForm

  • Solid Renewable Energy Stocks Worth Watching in September
    Zacks

    Solid Renewable Energy Stocks Worth Watching in September

    We have highlighted well-managed fundamentally sound renewable energy businesses that are worth a look this September.

  • 4 Top Renewable Energy Stocks to Buy Now
    Motley Fool

    4 Top Renewable Energy Stocks to Buy Now

    These clean energy stocks have the right combination of characteristics to make their investors lots of money in the coming years.

  • JinkoSolar (JKS) Q2 Earnings Miss Estimates, Revenues Beat
    Zacks

    JinkoSolar (JKS) Q2 Earnings Miss Estimates, Revenues Beat

    Higher operating expenses related to increased shipping costs hurt JinkoSolar's (JKS) earnings in Q2.

  • How Solar Stocks Played Out in August
    Market Realist

    How Solar Stocks Played Out in August

    Trade war intensified in August and that took a toll on the broader markets. However, solar stocks were largely positive and hint at future demand.

  • First Solar (FSLR) Down 7.1% Since Last Earnings Report: Can It Rebound?
    Zacks

    First Solar (FSLR) Down 7.1% Since Last Earnings Report: Can It Rebound?

    First Solar (FSLR) reported earnings 30 days ago. What's next for the stock? We take a look at earnings estimates for some clues.

  • Canadian Solar Wins Fund From Brazilian Bank for Solar Project
    Zacks

    Canadian Solar Wins Fund From Brazilian Bank for Solar Project

    BNB's funding multiple projects will enable Canadian Solar (CSIQ) to build one of the largest high efficiency bi-facial solar power plants in Latin America.

  • First Solar Is Ready to Lead the Next Round of Solar Mania
    Motley Fool

    First Solar Is Ready to Lead the Next Round of Solar Mania

    After a tough 2018, a standout new product positions the solar panel company to ride a new wave of demand.

  • JinkoSolar Holding (JKS) to Report Q2 Earnings: What's Up?
    Zacks

    JinkoSolar Holding (JKS) to Report Q2 Earnings: What's Up?

    JinkoSolar's (JKS) Q2 results are likely to reflect solid shipment figures. However, higher shipment costs might mar quarterly earnings.

  • First Solar Stock Looks Strong Compared to Its Peers
    Market Realist

    First Solar Stock Looks Strong Compared to Its Peers

    First Solar (FSLR) stock fell more than 10% from its 52-week high early this month. In a strong solar environment, FSLR stock has gained more than 45% YTD.

  • Thomson Reuters StreetEvents

    Edited Transcript of FSLR earnings conference call or presentation 1-Aug-19 8:30pm GMT

    Q2 2019 First Solar Inc Earnings Call

  • The Hottest ETFs of 2019
    Zacks

    The Hottest ETFs of 2019

    Solar and clean energy ETFs are among the top performing ETFs this year. We discuss why and what lies ahead.

  • CSIQ vs. FSLR: Which Stock Is the Better Value Option?
    Zacks

    CSIQ vs. FSLR: Which Stock Is the Better Value Option?

    CSIQ vs. FSLR: Which Stock Is the Better Value Option?

  • 3 Top Alternative Energy Stocks to Buy Right Now
    Motley Fool

    3 Top Alternative Energy Stocks to Buy Right Now

    These three stocks look like some of the best investments in alternative energy today.

  • The 10 Biggest Renewable Energy Stocks
    Motley Fool

    The 10 Biggest Renewable Energy Stocks

    Here's an in-depth look at the biggest companies that have significant exposure to the renewable energy sector.