FXY - Invesco CurrencyShares Japanese Yen

NYSEArca - Nasdaq Real Time Price. Currency in USD
86.67
+0.09 (+0.10%)
As of 9:55AM EDT. Market open.
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Previous Close86.58
Open86.64
Bid86.69 x 2200
Ask86.70 x 1800
Day's Range86.67 - 86.70
52 Week Range83.92 - 91.62
Volume10,204
Avg. Volume190,246
Net Assets167.48M
NAV88.15
PE Ratio (TTM)N/A
Yield0.00%
YTD Return3.39%
Beta (3y)0.01
Expense Ratio (net)0.40%
Inception Date2007-02-12
Trade prices are not sourced from all markets
  • 7 Exciting ETFs to Profit From Ongoing Trade Spat
    InvestorPlace14 days ago

    7 Exciting ETFs to Profit From Ongoing Trade Spat

    A host of Trump’s anti-trade policies has been playing foul in the stock market, leading to increased market uncertainty and trade tensions between the United States and countries around the world. After both the United States and China reached an agreement and vowed not to launch a trade war against each other, Trump’s announcement to impose a hefty 25% tariff on $50 billion worth of Chinese goods escalated tensions between the two. Trump also plans to restrict Chinese investment in U.S. companies and limit the number of goods that these can sell to China.

  • Will Safe-Haven Demand Push the Japanese Yen Higher?
    Market Realist19 days ago

    Will Safe-Haven Demand Push the Japanese Yen Higher?

    Last week, the Japanese yen (JYN) managed its first weekly gain against the US dollar in nine weeks as global risk aversion increased in response to political and geopolitical uncertainties. The yen (FXY) closed the week at 109.39, rising 1.2% against the US dollar (UUP). The news about US President Donald Trump canceling the US–North Korea summit and political uncertainties in Europe increased the demand for safe-haven assets, including the yen.

  • Political Drama in Europe to Push Safe Haven ETFs Higher
    Zacks20 days ago

    Political Drama in Europe to Push Safe Haven ETFs Higher

    The latest developments in Italy and Spain led to risk-off trading with lower risk securities in vogue.

  • What’s Driving the US Dollar Higher?
    Market Realist20 days ago

    What’s Driving the US Dollar Higher?

    The US Dollar Index (UUP) continued to appreciate but did so slowly in the week that ended on May 25. Rising political uncertainty in Europe, seesawing trade negotiations between the United States and China, and the diplomatic tussle between the United States and North Korea had an impact on currency markets in the week.

  • InvestorPlace25 days ago

    Trade of the Day: PowerShares Japanese Yen ETF (FXY)

    To receive further updates on this PowerShares Japanese Yen ETF (NYSEARCA:FXY) trade as well as an alert when it’s time to take profits, sign up for a risk-free trial of SlingShot Trader today. The yen rises in value when trade concerns and currency devaluations appear.

  • Investopedia25 days ago

    What the Yen Says About Market Risk

    In Wednesday's Daily Market Commentary webinar, our analysts discussed the importance of using exchange rates as an early warning sign of bearish moves in the stock market. Stock investors may not be generally aware that the Japanese yen and the U.S. stock market have a high level of inverse correlation. If the yen is rising, there is a good chance that stocks will languish or fall.

  • Why Fed Minutes Could Put Further Pressure on the Yen
    Market Realist26 days ago

    Why Fed Minutes Could Put Further Pressure on the Yen

    Last week, the Japanese yen (JYN) depreciated against the US dollar for the eighth consecutive week as the dollar continued its upward surge. It was the best run for the dollar against the yen since October 2014. The primary reason for the yen’s weakness is the widening spread between the US and Japanese treasuries, which is being driven by strong US economic performance compared to Japan.

  • Can the US Dollar Continue to Surge Higher?
    Market Realist27 days ago

    Can the US Dollar Continue to Surge Higher?

    Last week, the US dollar (UUP) index bounced back from a minor pullback in the week ended May 11. Both are positive for the US dollar. According to the latest Commitment of Traders report released on May 18 by the Chicago Futures Trading Commission, large speculators and traders have trimmed their short positions on the US dollar index.

  • Could There Be Respite for the Falling Yen?
    Market Realistlast month

    Could There Be Respite for the Falling Yen?

    The US Iran nuclear deal pullout failed to increase demand for haven bids such as the yen. The yen (FXY) closed last week at 109.39 against the US dollar (UUP), depreciating by 0.25%. A weak yen is positive for the export-dependent Japanese economy.

  • What Drove the US Dollar Lower Last Week
    Market Realistlast month

    What Drove the US Dollar Lower Last Week

    The US dollar index (UUP) took a breather last week, closing at 92.44, 0.03% higher than its close of 92.41 in the week ended May 4. The US dollar’s three-week rally was interrupted by the weak inflation report published last week, which was preceded by a weak jobs report on May 4. This US dollar slowdown could only be a speed breaker as the Fed remains the only central bank expected to tighten policies in the near term. The recently rejuvenated dollar-bond market correlation could continue supporting the dollar against major developed, developing, and emerging market currencies.

  • Will the Japanese Yen Continue to Depreciate against the US Dollar?
    Market Realistlast month

    Will the Japanese Yen Continue to Depreciate against the US Dollar?

    Last week, the Japanese yen (JYN) depreciated against the US dollar for a sixth consecutive week as the US dollar continued to rally. The US dollar rallied due to the Fed’s hawkishness and continued economic improvement. As Japanese markets were closed for three days last week, there was limited data reported from the Japanese economy. In the week ended May 4, the yen (FXY) closed at 109.1 against the US dollar (UUP), depreciating 0.06%. The yen’s (YCL) dream run seems to be done for now, and yen speculators have moved into bearish territory after staying net long for a little over four weeks.

  • Dollar Bears Under Pressure as Short Squeeze Continues
    Market Realistlast month

    Dollar Bears Under Pressure as Short Squeeze Continues

    In April, the US dollar index posted one of its best monthly gains (2.0%) since November 2016, and it looks set to continue with the trend this month. The main reason for this appreciation has been a higher positive correlation between the US dollar and bond yields. Rising bond yields increase the US-international bond spread, which increases preference for US bonds as they have better ratings.

  • Benzingalast month

    How The Yen Is Affecting Japanese ETFs

    It's no secret that Japanese stocks and the yen often move in opposite directions. The inverse relationship was on display in the first quarter when the WisdomTree Japan Hedged Equity Fund (NYSE: DXJ ) ...

  • What’s Next for the Yen after Global Risks Recede?
    Market Realist2 months ago

    What’s Next for the Yen after Global Risks Recede?

    The Japanese yen (JYN) depreciated against the US dollar for a fifth consecutive week, as the US dollar continued to rally on the back of higher bond yields and the prospect of a faster rate hike pace from the US Fed. The Bank of Japan had its April meeting and left all policy rates unchanged, and the key takeaway was removing the target date to achieve the 2% inflation target. Japanese yen (YCL) speculators are moving back into short territory after staying net-long for four weeks. As per the latest “Commitment of Traders” (or COT) report, released on April 27 by the Chicago Futures Trading Commission (or CFTC), speculators on the Japanese yen had a net long position of 583 contracts, compared to 2,591 long contracts the week before.

  • Bank of Japan: Weak Data Might Mean More Easing
    Market Realist2 months ago

    Bank of Japan: Weak Data Might Mean More Easing

    The Japanese yen (JYN) continued its depreciating trend in the previous week. Risk aversion receded and the US dollar rallied following higher bond yields and commodity prices. Now that geopolitical risks have declined, the demand for the yen as a safe haven will likely be low and could lead to more depreciation.

  • Will US Dollar Bulls Continue to Dominate This Week?
    Market Realist2 months ago

    Will US Dollar Bulls Continue to Dominate This Week?

    The US dollar (UUP) gained some lost ground last week due to reduced risk aversion, rising bond yields, weak economic data from global peers, and higher commodity prices. The US dollar rallied after bond yields started to rise and the ten-year yield broke past the February 2018 high. Economic data from the US included an acceptable level of retail sales and an optimistic Federal Beige Book. The US Dollar Index closed above 90.0 for the first time in five weeks and posted a weekly gain of 0.65%.

  • Could the Japanese Yen Bounce Back This Week?
    Market Realist2 months ago

    Could the Japanese Yen Bounce Back This Week?

    The Japanese yen (JYN), a safe haven asset, has failed to appreciate despite an increase in uncertainty in recent weeks. Despite ongoing trade war concerns and the US-led attack on Syrian chemical weapon facilities, the yen fell. In the week ended April 13, the yen (FXY) closed at 107.3 against the US dollar (UUP), depreciating by 0.38%.

  • US Dollar Falls after Trump Comments on April 16
    Market Realist2 months ago

    US Dollar Falls after Trump Comments on April 16

    The US dollar (UUP) came under pressure after Donald Trump, in a tweet, accused Russia and China “playing the Currency Devaluation game as the U.S. keeps raising interest rates. Not acceptable!” Trump’s complaint has been interpreted as an attempt to escalate tensions to achieve favorable trade negotiation terms. According to the latest Commitment of Traders report, released on April 13 by the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, large speculators and traders have increased their short positions on the US dollar for a third consecutive week. This amount is a combination of the US dollar’s contracts against the combined contracts of the euro (FXE), British pound (FXB), Japanese yen (FXY), Australian dollar (FXA), Canadian dollar (FXC), and Swiss franc.

  • MarketWatch2 months ago

    It’s time to buy gold, sell U.S. chip companies as U.S.-China trade dispute intensifies

    Also consider buying the Japanese yen and Chinese Big Tech, says Jeff Reeves.

  • BoJ Mulling Over a Stimulus Exit: ETFs in Focus
    Zacks2 months ago

    BoJ Mulling Over a Stimulus Exit: ETFs in Focus

    These Japan ETFs may gain if the BoJ manages to make an exit from its hefty stimulus program.

  • What's in Store for Japan ETFs as Inflation Picks up?
    Zacks3 months ago

    What's in Store for Japan ETFs as Inflation Picks up?

    Japan's central bank is halfway its inflation target; strengthening yen and trade war fears a drag.

  • What’s in Store for the Japanese Yen This Week?
    Market Realist3 months ago

    What’s in Store for the Japanese Yen This Week?

    The Japanese yen (JYN) managed to claw back its losses after the scare about a second round of tariffs hit the global financial markets last week. Japan’s February exports, March manufacturing, and inflation reports are expected this week.

  • FOMC Could Decide the Fate of the US Dollar This Week
    Market Realist3 months ago

    FOMC Could Decide the Fate of the US Dollar This Week

    The US Dollar Index appreciated for a fourth consecutive week due in part to the impressive industrial production and consumer confidence numbers that were reported at the end of the previous week. Earlier in the previous week, lower-than-expected inflation growth and retail sales numbers had little impact on the US dollar as markets have already priced in a rate hike from the US Fed at its March meeting. The turmoil in the White House had a marginal negative impact on the US dollar as the pressure from the Mueller probe reached the Trump businesses last week.

  • Why the Japanese Yen Depreciated Last Week
    Market Realist3 months ago

    Why the Japanese Yen Depreciated Last Week

    The Japanese yen (JYN) lost out to increased risk appetite thanks to softer-than-expected tariffs and the positive geopolitical development involving US President Donald Trump and North Korea’s Kim Jong Un. Also driving the yen higher were the comments from the Bank of Japan’s governor, Haruhiko Kuroda, who tried to take back his comments about the policy shift toward tightening. For the week ended March 9, the yen (FXY) closed at 106.80 compared to the US dollar (UUP), an appreciation of 0.99%.

  • Why the US Dollar Could Gain This Week
    Market Realist3 months ago

    Why the US Dollar Could Gain This Week

    Why This Week Is Pivotal for the Markets