GE - General Electric Company

NYSE - NYSE Delayed Price. Currency in USD
9.06
+0.27 (+3.07%)
At close: 4:00PM EDT
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Previous Close8.79
Open8.77
Bid0.00 x 42300
Ask0.00 x 34100
Day's Range8.61 - 9.06
52 Week Range6.40 - 12.32
Volume56,304,465
Avg. Volume67,008,735
Market Cap79.067B
Beta (3Y Monthly)1.14
PE Ratio (TTM)N/A
EPS (TTM)-2.16
Earnings DateOct 30, 2019
Forward Dividend & Yield0.04 (0.45%)
Ex-Dividend Date2019-09-13
1y Target Est10.11
Trade prices are not sourced from all markets
  • GuruFocus.com

    US Indexes End Lower Tuesday

    S&P; 500 down 0.36% Continue reading...

  • Boeing Always Seems to Be in Reaction Mode
    Bloomberg

    Boeing Always Seems to Be in Reaction Mode

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Someone had to take the fall for the latest disastrous turn in Boeing Co.’s 737 Max crisis and that someone appears to be commercial airplanes chief Kevin McAllister. Boeing abruptly announced on Tuesday afternoon — less than 24 hours before it's due to report third-quarter results — that McAllister is stepping down. He joined in 2016 from General Electric Co. and oversaw the unit responsible for the troubled Max, which has been grounded for seven months following two fatal crashes. He will be replaced by Stan Deal, formerly head of Boeing’s services division, effective immediately. The leadership shakeup comes as Boeing tries to counter the reputational damage from a bombshell release last week of instant messages that appeared to indicate internal hesitation over a flight-control system on the Max years before that same software would be implicated in the accidents. The messages have raised concern that it will be politically difficult for the Federal Aviation Administration to agree to put the plane back in the air by the end of the year, even as Boeing makes progress on a fix. Boeing has pushed back on the interpretation that the messages show it misled regulators, but its explanations are unlikely to curb the ire of angry lawmakers, some of whom have already called for the ouster of CEO Dennis Muilenburg.I would like to believe that Boeing is making a serious effort at holding itself accountable. But at the end of the day, like all of the company’s efforts at redemption in the wake of the Max crisis, it appears to be reacting to criticism, rather than doing the right thing on principle. The company last month unveiled an organizational overhaul meant to help insulate its engineers from profit concerns and the board stripped Muilenburg of his chairman title on Oct. 11. But those two changes book-ended an unflattering report from the Joint Authorities Technical Review (a body of experts including international and NASA delegates) that contended regulators lacked the resources and necessary information to properly evaluate the Max’s complex design and that Boeing exerted “undue pressures” on employees that had FAA authority to approve changes.  This seeming inability to embrace full accountability and transparency remains the company’s biggest problem. Until it rectifies that, it will be impossible for Boeing to truly move on from this crisis. One cynical read of this leadership change is that McAllister is simply more expendable than Muilenburg right now, with the CEO reportedly set to testify before the Senate on Oct. 29, one day before a scheduled appearance in front of the House of Representatives. I would imagine Muilenburg has spent hours preparing for that grilling, and Boeing may not have time at this point to get a replacement ready. With regard to those troubling messages, Boeing has countered that the description of the Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System flight-control software as “egregious” was meant to refer to a bug in a flight simulator that was being tested. The Seattle Times reports that this explanation checks out, based on three experts’ perspective. However, the FAA has rightly taken issue with the fact that Boeing reportedly turned over these documents to the Department of Justice in February – one month before the second Max crash – and yet only recently gave the information to the regulator. Boeing’s claims that the regulator was informed “multiple times” about the expanded role of the flight-control software run counter to reporting from the Seattle Times and others, as well that JATR report.Meanwhile, all major Max customers have now pulled the plane from their schedules through at least January 2020, giving up hope that it will be recertified in time for the holiday season. In his job as head of the commercial unit, McAllister was tasked not only with helping oversee the development of a fix for the flight-control system, but with managing Boeing’s relationship with customers. He appears to have fallen short on both fronts. The New York Times published a damning portrayal of McAllister last week as not being proactive enough in addressing the Max crisis with airlines and unwilling to accept criticism for the plane’s issues, which he blames on his predecessors.He is unlikely to be the last Boeing executive to be shown the door. To contact the author of this story: Brooke Sutherland at bsutherland7@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Beth Williams at bewilliams@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Brooke Sutherland is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering deals and industrial companies. She previously wrote an M&A column for Bloomberg News.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Barrons.com

    Boeing’s Head of Commercial Airplanes Steps Down as Fallout Grows on 737 MAX Jet

    Boeing Commercial Airplanes CEO Kevin McAllister is leaving the jet maker. Stanley Deal, CEO of Boeing Global Services, will succeed him.

  • United Technologies Earnings Growth Accelerates; Dow Jones Stock Breaks Out
    Investor's Business Daily

    United Technologies Earnings Growth Accelerates; Dow Jones Stock Breaks Out

    United Technologies earnings unexpectedly accelerated for a second straight quarter. The Dow Jones component moved above a buy point.

  • Barrons.com

    GE Needs a New CFO. We Have the Perfect Candidate.

    United Technologies CFO Akhil Johri is leaving the industrial conglomerate on November 1. But there is a notable CFO vacancy to fill in coming months, at GE.

  • Business Wire

    Bombardier Connects With GE to Go Big on Big Data, Offers Free “Smart” Box for Challenger, Global Customers

    Bombardier today announced a Preferred Service Provider (PSP) agreement with GE Aviation. As of today, GE will power Bombardier’s cockpit and cabin connectivity solutions – including new, curated, service bundles that will simplify the selection of cockpit and cabin services with tip-to-tail solutions for new and in-service aircraft. This agreement is a first step toward the launch of Bombardier’s comprehensive Smart Link Plus connected aircraft program.

  • Investing.com

    Day Ahead - Top 3 Things to Watch

    Investing.com - Here's a preview of the top 3 things to watch that could rock markets tomorrow.

  • Barrons.com

    Corporate-Jet Ownership Flies Mostly Under Shareholders’ Radar

    Many S&P 500 companies still use private jets—eschewing commercial travel for top executives—but finding out which ones do so is surprisingly hard.

  • General Electric Rises 3%
    Investing.com

    General Electric Rises 3%

    Investing.com - General Electric (NYSE:GE) rose by 3.08% to trade at $9.05 by 15:49 (19:49 GMT) on Tuesday on the NYSE exchange.

  • Lockheed Beats Q3 Estimates, Falls on 2020 Guidance
    Market Realist

    Lockheed Beats Q3 Estimates, Falls on 2020 Guidance

    Lockheed Martin released its third-quarter earnings results today. The company reported revenue of $15.2 billion in the quarter, a 6% year-over-year rise.

  • Boeing cites ‘progress’ in returning 737 MAX to service
    American City Business Journals

    Boeing cites ‘progress’ in returning 737 MAX to service

    The Boeing Co. says it’s making “significant progress” in returning the problematic 737 MAX airplanes to service. Here’s what Boeing says it’s currently doing:  “Boeing has made significant progress over the past several months in support of safely returning the 737 MAX to service as the company continues to work with the FAA and other global regulators on the process laid out for certifying the 737 MAX software and related training updates. The company has also made significant governance and operational changes to further sharpen its focus.” The fallout from grounding the 737 MAX isn’t just impacting Boeing, but its massive supply chain.  For example, General Electric Co. stands to take an estimated $1.4 billion hit to its cash flow this year if Boeing Co.’s 737 MAX planes, which feature engines made by a GE joint venture, remain grounded through the rest of 2019.

  • Business Wire

    Safety Is Priority in Jet Aviation Deal With GE Aviation

    Global leading data analytics solution promotes a culture of safety and efficiency

  • Reuters

    Poland's richest man to work with GE Hitachi on mini nuclear plant

    Synthos, a chemical group owned by Poland's richest man Michal Solowow, has agreed to work with GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy on developing technology for a small modular reactor (SMR), Hitachi said on Monday. Poland still generates most of its electricity from coal but more and more companies are exploring low-carbon options. "Utilizing small modular reactors to generate clean energy will improve our chances to move away from coal and have a positive impact on our industry and nation," Solowow was quoted as saying.

  • Financial Times

    Poland’s richest man teams up with GE Hitachi on nuclear reactor

    GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy and Poland’s richest man are to team up to build Poland’s first nuclear power plant, as the central European country looks for ways to diversify its energy supplies. GEH and Synthos, the Polish chemicals group owned by Michal Solowow, said they had signed a memorandum of understanding to build a small modular reactor in Poland, which currently depends heavily on coal for its electricity. “Small modular reactors can play a significant role in addressing Poland’s energy challenges, the modernisation of the nation’s energy sector and in achieving necessary and responsible deep decarbonisation,” Mr Solowow, whose fortune is estimated by Forbes at $3.2bn, said in a statement.

  • General Electric (GE) Stock Sinks As Market Gains: What You Should Know
    Zacks

    General Electric (GE) Stock Sinks As Market Gains: What You Should Know

    In the latest trading session, General Electric (GE) closed at $8.79, marking a -1.9% move from the previous day.

  • Barrons.com

    How GE Stock Can Keep Working — Or Not

    GE is a complicated company, making it difficult to assess the turnaround being led by new CEO Larry Culp. Positive free cash flow, more debt reduction, and no new “hidden” debt from legacy insurance liabilities should be what it takes for the stock to keep working the rest of 2019.

  • Earnings Preview: Boeing, Caterpillar, 3M, GE, and More
    Market Realist

    Earnings Preview: Boeing, Caterpillar, 3M, GE, and More

    Honeywell kicked off industrials earnings season, beating estimates. With Boeing, Caterpillar, 3M, GE, and more reporting soon, here's what to expect.

  • Financial Times

    Miner BHP plans $780m provision over renewables switch

    BHP, the world’s largest miner, said it expected to make a multimillion-pound provision this year due to a switch from coal to renewable sources of energy in Chile. The miner said it had signed four renewable power agreements for its Escondida and Spence copper mines, which will be completely run off renewable sources by the mid-2020s. “These new renewable energy contracts will increase flexibility for our power portfolio and will ensure security of supply for our operations, while also reducing costs and displacing CO2 emissions,” Daniel Malchuk, head of BHP Americas, said.

  • GE Subsidiaries: List of Mergers and Acquisitions
    Investopedia

    GE Subsidiaries: List of Mergers and Acquisitions

    General Electric is one of the largest and, at times, most profitable multinational conglomerate in the U.S. These subsidiaries and acquisitions represent some of GE's key operational segments.

  • This GE Spinoff Nears Buy Point On Strong Earnings
    Investor's Business Daily

    This GE Spinoff Nears Buy Point On Strong Earnings

    Private-label credit card leader Synchrony Financial moved toward a buy point after the IBD 50 stock bested earnings estimates Friday.

  • This Fierce Battle For The World's Longest Flight Just Began In Earnest
    Investor's Business Daily

    This Fierce Battle For The World's Longest Flight Just Began In Earnest

    Qantas is starting research flights for the longest flight in the world with a newly delivered Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner as Airbus finalizes its offering.

  • GE Stock Rises After Strong Earnings From These Industrial Peers
    Investor's Business Daily

    GE Stock Rises After Strong Earnings From These Industrial Peers

    Honeywell and Dover beat Q3 estimates and raised full-year guidance, boosting General Electric, United Technologies and other industrial giants.

  • John Hancock to sell Back Bay site approved for 26-story tower
    American City Business Journals

    John Hancock to sell Back Bay site approved for 26-story tower

    The Boston Redevelopment Authority gave the insurance giant its OK for the project in 2015, but the company never moved forward with construction.

  • Barrons.com

    Netflix Stock Is Rising and IBM Is Falling. The Market Might Have It Backward.

    IBM and Netflix reported better-than-expected earnings and sales that fell a bit short of Wall Street analysts’ forecasts. IBM stock is getting hammered, while Netflix is on the rise, a sign that investors prefer growth to cash flow.