GOOG Jun 2019 1060.000 call

OPR - OPR Delayed Price. Currency in USD
118.20
+5.01 (+4.43%)
As of 12:12PM EDT. Market open.
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous Close113.19
Open118.20
Bid111.00
Ask112.60
Strike1,060.00
Expire Date2019-06-21
Day's Range118.20 - 118.20
Contract RangeN/A
Volume1
Open Interest103
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What Wieser SaysWieser's been a FB critic for a while. As far back as 2017 he voiced concern that the advertising reach Facebook boasted of the United States' 18 to 24 year olds was mathematically impossible. Facebook said it had a potential 41 million individuals in this crowd, but the most recent U.S. census reports there were only 31 million people between those ages living in the U.S.Facebook responded, explaining "Reach estimations are based on a number of factors, including Facebook user behaviors, user demographics, location data from devices, and other factors. They are designed to estimate how many people in a given area are eligible to see an ad a business might run. They are not designed to match population or census estimates. We are always working to improve our estimates."While no demographic research is perfect, a ten-million-people overstatement is more than mere rounding error, and it underscores a point Wieser has made more than once. That is, per a note published in October, "the company is not as in control of its business as it needs to be."Wieser was specifically referencing a spate of issues that had then-recently surfaced, including accusations of deceptive video-ad metrics and new hints that a data-scraping outfit with Russian ties may have illicitly garnered user data. The bigger point remains the same though. That is, each question that's raised ultimately dents the social media platforms ability to sell ads.He's not changed his mind in the meantime either. In January of this year, Wieser voiced further concern that "the toxicity of the company may also deter commercial partners from choosing to work with Facebook, or otherwise make terms less attractive to Facebook." The Pivotal Research analyst believes that Amazon.com (NASDAQ:AMZN), of all outfits, could be in good position to swipe some of Facebook's ad share."Despite its current massive size," Wieser says, "we see Amazon's opportunities as mostly unconstrained based on a successful track record of capitalizing on consumer and IT department spending."Certainly Twitter (NYSE:TWTR) and Alphabet (NASDAQ:GOOGL, NASDAQ:GOOG) breadwinner Google could also capitalize on the crimped credibility of Facebook. PhilosophyThe challenge to Pivotal's point of view is two-fold. First, it lacks specifics and is more philosophical in nature. Second, if it's going to happen, it hasn't happened in earnest yet.Last quarter, Facebook's top line of $15.1 billion was up 26% from the year-earlier figure of just under 12.0 billion. Were it not for a $3.0 billion charge from legal expenses related to an FTC matter, operating income would have rolled in at $6.3 billion, up 12% from the year-earlier figure of $5.6 billion. The number of daily users reached another record of 1.562 billion, and the average revenue per user was up year-over-year from $5.53 per quarter to $6.42.Something has changed though. The company's cost of revenue grew to 19% of its total sales, moving to its highest rate for the past eight quarters.One quarter doesn't make a trend, but all trends start with one quarter's worth of data. If it's getting tougher to sell ad space, the company's 'cost of revenue' line is one place the shift would materialize first.And that's happening on the eve of another sweeping change that Facebook has been forced by societal pressure to make. Facebook is about to unveil a 'clear history' feature to its users that will effectively delete the valuable browsing data each of those members has created about themselves that's then sold to advertisers seeking highly-granulated information.Advertisers who may already be less-than-impressed with Facebook's platform will now have to settle for even less-specific user data, shoving Facebook into a corner Wieser has long feared the company would paint itself into by overly aggressive and misguided practices.Then there's growing governmental regulation. France is the latest nation to put Facebook's operation under the microscope, effectively writing Facbook's hate-speech policies for the company. More such rules are now sure to come, opening the door to heavy-handed government control no publishing platform truly wants to allow. Bottom Line for FB StockEven so, Wieser concedes that Facebook's problems are fixable. 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