GOOG Aug 2019 1300.000 call

OPR - OPR Delayed Price. Currency in USD
0.1000
-0.3500 (-77.78%)
As of 12:11PM EDT. Market open.
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous Close0.4500
Open0.1000
Bid0.0000
Ask0.2500
Strike1,300.00
Expire Date2019-08-30
Day's Range0.1000 - 0.1000
Contract RangeN/A
Volume2
Open InterestN/A
  • Amazon, Google, Facebook testify against France’s digital sales tax
    Yahoo Finance

    Amazon, Google, Facebook testify against France’s digital sales tax

    Amazon, Facebook and Google told the United States Trade Representative's office how France's digital services tax could hurt their businesses at a hearing on Monday.

  • Companies to Watch: Big quarter for Estée Lauder, major addition for Uber, Tesla to rent out solar panels
    Yahoo Finance

    Companies to Watch: Big quarter for Estée Lauder, major addition for Uber, Tesla to rent out solar panels

    Estée Lauder, Uber, Google, Tesla, Microsoft and Nvidia are the companies to watch.

  • Market Realist

    Is Huawei a Threat to Google’s Advertising Business?

    Huawei plans to launch its own mapping service as soon as this October. But Huawei’s Map Kit will initially not be a consumer mapping service.

  • YouTube seeks 'strategic partner managers' amid content crackdown, accusations of censorship
    American City Business Journals

    YouTube seeks 'strategic partner managers' amid content crackdown, accusations of censorship

    Each new partner manager will be tasked with handling relationships with either conservative or progressive political publishers.

  • U.S. to Ease Huawei Sanctions for Another 90 Days, Ross Says
    Bloomberg

    U.S. to Ease Huawei Sanctions for Another 90 Days, Ross Says

    (Bloomberg) -- Terms of Trade is a daily newsletter that untangles a world embroiled in trade wars. Sign up here. The U.S. will extend for another 90 days a narrow set of exemptions that had protected rural networks and other U.S. customers from a ban on doing business with China’s Huawei Technologies Co., Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross said Monday.Some telecom companies in the U.S. are "dependent" on Huawei, and thus a 90-day reprieve was deemed appropriate, Ross said in an interview with Fox Business’s Maria Bartiromo."We’re giving them a little more time to wean themselves off," he added. Ross said the next deadline will be around Nov. 19. He added that Commerce decided to place 46 more Huawei subsidiaries on its entity list.The announcement doesn’t address the wider national-security concerns about Huawei and answer the bigger question of whether U.S. chip companies and other major suppliers will be allowed to sell parts to China.QuickTake: How Huawei Became a Target for GovernmentsPresident Donald Trump over the weekend indicated the U.S. was “doing very well with China, and talking” but also suggested he wasn’t ready to sign a trade deal.U.S. stocks climbed Monday after the Trump administration signaled progress on trade negotiations and Ross announced the extension. Treasuries slumped.Huawei, China’s largest technology company by sales, has been at the heart of worsening tensions and been called a bargaining chip in thorny trade negotiations between Washington and Beijing. Trump had said he anticipated talking with Chinese President Xi Jinping “very soon” and the Huawei move may sweeten the tone of those discussions.Huawei, for its part, has been trying to carry on operations in face of U.S. sanctions on the sale of the vital technology. The company this month announced its in-house HarmonyOS, an open-source operating system that could one day serve as a replacement for Google Inc.’s Android if its access to that software is curtailed.Without Android or the numerous American silicon, technology and consultancy suppliers that Huawei does business with, many of its most promising product lines would either cease their rapid growth or be thwarted entirely.Rural AreasThe U.S. Commerce Department previously granted a three-month temporary license to Huawei’s U.S. customers shortly after the Trump administration blacklisted the Chinese company. That allowed telecom carriers in rural areas to continue using Huawei equipment and Google to provide only key Android security updates to Huawei phones.The latest extension came after Trump met in July with the chief executives of key Huawei suppliers from Alphabet Inc.’s Google and Broadcom Inc. to Intel Corp. and Qualcomm Inc. to discuss economic issues including a possible resumption of sales to Huawei. U.S. companies argued that Huawei will turn to non-American suppliers if sanctions persisted, hurting the U.S. in the long run. But trade talks with Beijing ground to a halt and China refused to resume purchases of American agricultural products.National SecurityThe announcement Monday came one day after President Trump suggested that Huawei was unlikely to receive another extension, pushing back against news reports about an expected reprieve."At this moment, it looks much more like we’re not going to do business," Trump told reporters on Sunday in New Jersey. "I don’t want to do business at all, because it is a national security threat."The president tied trade negotiations with the ongoing situation in Hong Kong, saying that a deal between the U.S. and China would be harder if there’s a violent conclusion to protests there because of concerns raised by U.S. lawmakers.Earlier this month, the trade war between the two countries intensified as the U.S. announced a next round of 10% tariffs on Chinese imports between Sept. 1 and Dec. 15. China responded with a boycott of American farm products and allowed its currency to weaken, signaling that this can help cushion the tariff blow.(Updates with markets in sixth paragraph.)\--With assistance from Gao Yuan and Kasia Klimasinska.To contact the reporters on this story: Vlad Savov in Tokyo at vsavov5@bloomberg.net;Jordan Fabian in New York at jfabian6@bloomberg.net;Shawn Donnan in Washington at sdonnan@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Edwin Chan at echan273@bloomberg.net, Elizabeth Wasserman, Kathleen HunterFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Report: Privacy issues prompt Google to shut down a service for wireless carriers
    American City Business Journals

    Report: Privacy issues prompt Google to shut down a service for wireless carriers

    Google's Mobile Network Insights service, which was launched in March 2017 and provided free to carriers, used aggregated data from devices that ran Google’s Android operating system.

  • Benzinga

    This Day In Market History: The Google IPO

    Each day, Benzinga takes a look back at a notable market-related moment that occurred on this date. What Happened? On this day 15 years ago, Google held its initial public offering. Where The Market Was ...

  • Exclusive: Fearing data privacy issues, Google cuts some Android phone data for wireless carriers
    Reuters

    Exclusive: Fearing data privacy issues, Google cuts some Android phone data for wireless carriers

    NEW YORK/SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - Alphabet Inc's Google has shut down a service it provided to wireless carriers globally that showed them weak spots in their network coverage, people familiar with the matter told Reuters, because of Google's concerns that sharing data from users of its Android phone system might attract the scrutiny of users and regulators. The withdrawal of the service, which has not been previously reported, has disappointed wireless carriers that used the data as part of their decision-making process on where to extend or upgrade their coverage. Google's Mobile Network Insights service, which had launched in March 2017, was essentially a map showing carriers signal strengths and connection speeds they were delivering in each area.

  • Bloomberg

    Amazon Wants to Put Alexa in Cars. Google and Apple Are There Already

    (Bloomberg) -- Somewhere between Spotify crashing and Alexa failing to locate his favorite sushi place, Rafael Rivera decided he was dealing with an unfinished product.The software developer’s rectangular Echo Auto, perched on the dashboard of his 2005 Mini Cooper, picked up his voice seamlessly over blaring music or air conditioning. But repeated restarts and clunky mapping made the on-the-go hub for Amazon.com Inc.’s Alexa less useful.“Am I part of a beta program?” he recalls thinking. “Is this thing done?”Introduced almost a year ago and shipped to the first invited customers in January, the sometimes-buggy Echo Auto is the most visible element so far of Amazon’s ambition to take Alexa on the road.Behind the scenes, the company is trying to persuade automakers to bake the voice-activated digital assistant into their entertainment systems. Those efforts are gaining some traction—BMW and Audi earlier this year began selling select models that integrate Alexa’s software by default. But Amazon is entering a market already contested by Google and Apple Inc., not to mention automakers leery of ceding control of the dashboard to Big Tech.While colonizing the car probably won’t generate much in the way of revenue at first, just being there would help Amazon position itself for a coming era of voice-based services. “Amazon wants to get into the car in a big way,” says Mike Ramsey, a senior research director at Gartner who tracks the auto industry. “They sense that there is a big opportunity.”Amazon declined to make anyone available to discuss the program, but a spokesman pointed to comments Ned Curic, vice president of Alexa Automotive, made last month to the Automotive News: “The real North Star for us is to be embedded with all the cars,” Curic said. “We’re working very hard to get there because we believe that is the best experience.”The company has said it wants to make Alexa, its hub for trivia, music and Amazon products, ubiquitous. The company built teams in recent years charged with making the software useful beyond the living room, seeking ties to home automation and security companies, building out voice and video calling functionality and even exploring wearable devices and home robots.The first tie between Alexa and an automaker was, like many Amazon efforts, an experiment. In 2016, Hyundai Motor Co. rolled out the first application linking Alexa to a big carmaker in a tool that let owners of some models start their vehicle or set the climate control from an Alexa device.Amazon formalized its push a year later, hiring Curic, an executive with Toyota Motor Corp.’s North American subsidiary, to run the automotive efforts. Curic’s team plucked staff from Lab126, the San Francisco Bay Area hardware division behind the Echo speaker, and Amazon Web Services, the company’s cloud-computing arm. Amazon also went shopping for recruits who knew their way around the industry, seeking veterans of German stalwarts like Daimler AG, BMW and Volkswagen, companies that have been among the most aggressive in exploring voice software.Hanging over the exercise to take Alexa on the road is Amazon’s failure to build a smartphone to rival Alphabet Inc.’s Google and Apple. About 62% of  people who use their voice to control music or other applications in their car today do so through a smartphone, a market dominated by Google and Apple, according to a survey by voice technology news site Voicebot and dashboard entertainment startup Drivetime. Another 32% opt for the software included in their car’s entertainment system while 6% use different technology, including the Echo Auto.“Amazon’s Achilles heel is not having a play on the phone,” says John Foster, chief executive of Aiqudo Inc. a startup working to tailor mobile applications for voice control. “They’re going at it the best way they can. But I do think they suffer from this disadvantage that Google is really starting to make clear.”Google, the company behind Android, the world’s most popular operating system, has gotten automakers on board, building ties that could be used to hook drivers into Google's Assistant, Alexa's biggest rival in the U.S. Fiat Chrysler Automobiles, Renault-Nissan-Mitsubishi and Volvo are all building entertainment systems on Android.“Google has a much bigger footprint in the auto industry than Amazon does,” says Ramsey, of Gartner. “They’re getting big wins. Amazon is just starting to scratch the surface.”Other carmakers are going their own route.Some, like Daimler’s Mercedes, have thrown their weight behind proprietary voice software. The Mercedes-Benz User Experience system, like many automaker-branded software, is powered by technology built by Nuance Communications Inc., a software company in Massachusetts.“Each of these manufacturers wants to preserve their own brand” in the car, says Richard Mack, a Nuance marketing executive. “When you press that button on the steering wheel, Mercedes would much rather see their emblem come up rather than a Google or an Amazon or a Microsoft logo.”Amazon has tried to assuage carmakers worried about Google or Apple's potential automotive ambitions by suggesting Alexa could be one among several voice assistants embedded in a future entertainment system, according to two people who have heard the pitch, but aren't authorized to publicly discuss it. Amazon last year released tools that let carmakers build Alexa into their cars. The company has also tried to leverage Alexa’s popularity in the home, saying to potential partners that customers would rather use voice software they’re already familiar with than learn a new program while behind the wheel.As Curic’s team negotiated with carmakers, Lab126 engineers got to work on an end around, repurposing the Echo speaker’s microphone arrays and software, originally designed for homes, for noisy car environments. The device avoided dealing with in-car communications systems entirely by piggybacking off of customers’ smartphone to connect to Alexa servers.When it was released, analysts said the Echo Auto seemed to fill a gap in the market, offering a device that promised to bring modern voice control to older car models. It drew more than 1 million orders, Amazon said, though the device is still shipping in batches and only to invited customers.Reviewers said the device lacked polish, coming off at times like a work-in-progress. A reviewer at tech news site the Verge said some of the auto-focused applications Amazon touts on its website “are laughably bad right now.”It’s harder to get a read on how customers feel because Amazon, which helped popularize online product reviews, has disabled customer reviews for the Echo Auto.Ryan Adzima, who bought one to replace the outdated voice control system that came standard in his Jeep, is a fan. The owner of five Echo smart speakers figured the device’s introductory price tag of $25 was a bargain compared with replacing his entertainment system or buying a voice-activated navigation system.He liked the device, which heard his commands over road noise with the windows open and top down and easily handled tasks like calls and music. Connectivity, dependent on sometimes spotty wireless service around his Las Vegas home, left something to be desired, forcing him to reach for his phone to skip songs by hand when Alexa’s servers couldn’t be reached.Adzima isn’t in the market for a new car. But if Alexa is integrated in enough models by the time he is, he’ll consider it.“If I was sitting on a lot, and one car had Alexa built in, the other didn’t, and the cost difference wasn’t that much?,” he says. “That would definitely make my decision.”To contact the author of this story: Matt Day in Seattle at mday63@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Robin Ajello at rajello@bloomberg.net, Andrew PollackFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Bloomberg

    Google, Facebook Unite With Trump to Protest French Tech Tax

    (Bloomberg) -- Terms of Trade is a daily newsletter that untangles a world embroiled in trade wars. Sign up here. The relationship between President Donald Trump and the largest U.S. technology companies has often been frosty but a common opponent -- France’s plan to tax U.S. tech giants -- will bring the two sides together, at least temporarily.Alphabet Inc.’s Google, Facebook Inc. and Amazon.com Inc. are all scheduled to testify in Washington on Monday in support of the Trump administration’s efforts to potentially punish France for enacting a 3% tax on global tech companies with at least 750 million euros ($832 million) in global revenue and digital sales of 25 million euros in France.France’s digital tax “is a sharp departure from long-established tax rules and uniquely targets a subset of businesses,” according to prepared remarks a Google representative is scheduled to deliver in the U.S. Trade Representative’s Office hearing in Washington on Monday. “French government officials have emphasized repeatedly that the” tax is intended to target foreign technology companies.How ‘Digital Tax’ Plans in Europe Hit U.S. Tech: QuickTakeThe U.S. is probing France’s new tax, which French President Emmanuel Macron signed into law last month, using a tool that could be a precursor to new tariffs or other trade restrictions. U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer could take action as soon as Aug. 26 when a comment period on the issue closes.‘Radical Left’The effort to crack down on France has created common ground for Trump -- who has called Google and Facebook “on the side of the Radical Left Democrats” and accused Amazon of avoiding taxes -- and technology companies that are both worried foreign governments are looking to use American corporations as a way to collect additional tax revenue.The U.S. is looking to use France as an example to deter other countries from targeting American technology firms for tax dollars. The U.K., New Zealand, Spain and Italy are among countries considering their own digital taxes, a move that U.S. officials say could lead to companies being taxed multiple times on the same profits.Trump has threatened to tax French wine or other goods in response to the digital tax. He tweeted last month “we will announce a substantial reciprocal action on Macron’s foolishness shortly!” The so-called 301 investigation, which looks into unfair trade practices, is the same tool Trump used to slap tariffs on China over alleged intellectual-property theft.The U.S. says countries considering their own version of a digital tax should focus on ongoing global talks with 130 countries on how to tax tech companies. Any future pact would likely create a whole new set of rules governing which countries have the right to tax the companies, which corporate profits are taxable, and how to resolve the inevitable disputes that would arise. A deal could be reached as soon as next year.Opposition to France’s tax is a rare area of bipartisan agreement in Congress. In a letter to Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin in June, Senators Chuck Grassley, an Iowa Republican, and Ron Wyden, an Oregon Democrat, urged the U.S. to look at “all available tools under U.S. law to address such targeted and discriminatory taxation.”The lawmakers included a suggestion to use a section of the tax code that would double the rate of U.S. taxes on French citizens and companies in the U.S.To contact the reporter on this story: Laura Davison in Washington at ldavison4@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Joe Sobczyk at jsobczyk@bloomberg.net, Sarah McGregor, Robert JamesonFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Russia's Yandex looks at ten-fold increase in driverless car fleet to speed up testing
    Reuters

    Russia's Yandex looks at ten-fold increase in driverless car fleet to speed up testing

    Yandex, a Russian equivalent to Google, said it is considering expanding its fleet of self-driving cars to up to 1,000 within the next two years in order to speed up tests on the fledgling technology. Yandex hopes to start testing more than 100 of its self-driving cars on roads by the end of this year. Research published by HSBC bank in January said that Yandex's autonomous driving software put it on a par with global leaders in the technology and that it was catching up with Google's Waymo.

  • Bloomberg

    ByteDance Invests in Chinese Wikipedia-like Site in Search Push

    (Bloomberg) -- ByteDance Inc. has invested in a prominent Chinese Wikipedia-like platform, stepping up its internet search challenge to rival Baidu Inc.A unit of ByteDance, the world’s most valuable startup according to CB Insights, now holds 22% of the registered capital of Baike.com, according to a recent update on a Chinese government website that publishes company registration information. Baike, which means encyclopedia in Chinese, is the country’s second largest such reference platform and was founded in 2005 by Chief Executive Officer Pan Haidong. Pan is no longer listed as a shareholder of his company, the website shows.As China’s internet shifts from desktop to mobile, ByteDance is increasingly chipping away at advertising sales from Baidu, drawing users to its umbrella of apps from news aggregation to short video platforms. It’s also moving into Baidu’s core search engine business, launching Toutiao Search. That already features entries from Baike.com and started out as a function within ByteDance’s popular news app of the same name. It’s being built into a Google-like service and the company has said it’s recruited from Google, Baidu and Microsoft Corp.’s Bing.Baidu uses its own Wikipedia-like Baidu Baike, which is the market leader. Wikipedia is blocked in all languages in China.Representatives from ByteDance and Baike.com didn’t immediately respond to requests for comment. A spokesman for Baidu had previously declined to comment on ByteDance’s search service, but referred to remarks by a company executive who said Baidu has successfully fended off new entrants in the past.To contact the reporter on this story: Zheping Huang in Hong Kong at zhuang245@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Edwin Chan at echan273@bloomberg.net, Colum MurphyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • 3 Reasons Lyft Is a Better Buy Than Uber
    Motley Fool

    3 Reasons Lyft Is a Better Buy Than Uber

    Uber may be the big, bad wolf of ridesharing; Lyft is the better buy by a mile.

  • Will Buybacks Propel Booking Holdings' Stock Price?
    Motley Fool

    Will Buybacks Propel Booking Holdings' Stock Price?

    Growth is slowing, but the company is using cash flow to buy back gobs of its stock.

  • Goldman: Huawei deadline could further escalate a ‘full-blown economic conflict’ between U.S., China
    MarketWatch

    Goldman: Huawei deadline could further escalate a ‘full-blown economic conflict’ between U.S., China

    U.S.-China trade tensions could escalate next week following the expiration of an export ban against Chinese telecom giant Huawei

  • Barrons.com

    Harvard University Sold Apple and Facebook Stock — and Bought Alphabet

    Harvard University’s endowment made some bold stock trades in the calendar second quarter. Harvard Management Co., or HMC, the entity that manages the endowment, oversaw $405 million in U.S.-traded equities as of June 30.

  • Bloomberg

    Trump’s Dinner Guest on Friday Will Be Apple’s CEO Tim Cook

    (Bloomberg) -- President Donald Trump, who has repeatedly lashed out at technology giants and their leaders, announced on Friday evening that he would be dining with Apple Inc. Chief Executive Officer Tim Cook.“Having dinner tonight with Tim Cook of Apple,” Trump, who is staying at his golf resort in Bedminster, New Jersey, wrote on Twitter. “They will be spending vast sums of money in the U.S. Great!”He did not elaborate, and Apple did not immediately respond to a request for comment on the meeting.Heads of other major technology companies, including Amazon.com Inc., Alphabet Inc.’s Google and Facebook Inc. have not fared as well in the president’s tweets and public remarks.He and his political allies have made unsupported claims that social media companies muzzle conservative views. Trump has assailed Amazon for edging out brick-and-mortar retailers and criticized its founder Jeff Bezos, who owns the Washington Post.Pressure on tech companies is increasing in Washington as congressional Republicans examine accusations of bias against conservatives; Democrats in the House conduct an antitrust inquiry and officials at the Justice Department and the Federal Trade Commission divvy up oversight of Google, Facebook, Apple, and Amazon.Earlier this week, FTC Chairman Joe Simons said in an interview that he wouldn’t let Trump’s complaints about the size and political inclinations of large technology platforms affect his agency’s decisions.Cook visited the White House in June to discuss the Trump administration’s efforts to develop job training programs that meet the changing demands of U.S. employers. The meeting was part of the American Workforce Policy Advisory Board, a working group that includes many corporate leaders. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross and Trump’s daughter and adviser Ivanka Trump unveiled the initiative earlier this year.\--With assistance from Alistair Barr.To contact the reporter on this story: John Harney in Washington at jharney2@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Kevin Whitelaw at kwhitelaw@bloomberg.net, John HarneyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • The ‘best job in America’ pays over $108,000 a year — and has a high number of openings
    MarketWatch

    The ‘best job in America’ pays over $108,000 a year — and has a high number of openings

    Is there a job out there that gives you a six-figure income, high job satisfaction and has enough job openings to make it a real possibility? The “Glassdoor Job Score” is determined by weighing three factors equally: Earning potential (median annual base salary), overall job satisfaction rating and number of job openings.

  • 5 Top Stock Trades for Monday: AMD, BAC, FB, GE, DE
    InvestorPlace

    5 Top Stock Trades for Monday: AMD, BAC, FB, GE, DE

    Friday was a big day for investors. On Thursday, we said bulls would have liked to see a bigger rebound following Wednesday's brutal beating. But Friday proved strong, with U.S. stocks posting impressive gains across the board. * 10 Cheap Dividend Stocks to Load Up On Let's look at a few top stock trades going forward.InvestorPlace - Stock Market News, Stock Advice & Trading Tips Top Stock Trades for Tomorrow: Advanced Micro Devices (AMD) Advanced Micro Devices (NASDAQ:AMD) has been all over the map lately. Luckily, we're getting new levels to work with on the charts.For now, the 100-day moving average is buoying the stock, with short-term uptrend support also helping to guide AMD higher. Ideally, bulls will see shares reclaim prior uptrend support (blue line), as well as the 20-day and 50-day moving averages.If AMD stock can do that, a test of resistance between $34 and $34.50 is on the table. If it can't reclaim these levels, they may act as resistance going forward. That puts the 100-day back on the table.If it falls below the 100-day, the $29.21 lows and the $27.65 lows are possible. Bank of America (BAC)Is Bank of America (NYSE:BAC) a safe buy? It's hard not to like the stock down here. Not only has this $26.25 to $26.50 area proven to be solid-range support for all of 2019, but BAC stock has put in three straight days with almost identical lows.The fact that these lows held gives longs a great risk/reward situation. $26 can be a stop out point for longs, while they look for a rebound higher. $27.50 is a conservative target, but $28 doesn't seem to be out of the picture.A rebound up to the 50-day and 100-day confluence near $28.75 also seams reasonable. Remember, this stock was at $31 a few weeks ago and these big shakeouts have usually been good buying opportunities. Near range support, it's a worthy risk. Facebook (FB)Alphabet (NASDAQ:GOOG, NASDAQ:GOOGL) is holding trend right now, while Amazon (NASDAQ:AMZN) has quite a bit of support nearby too. Facebook (NASDAQ:FB) though? Shares are looking suspect at the moment.So far, support is holding near $179 to $180, but downtrend resistance (blue line) is squeezing FB lower. Falling below most of its major moving averages isn't helping the bulls' case either.Over downtrend resistance will help, but for FB stock to really have upside potential, it needs to clear its 50-day and 100-day moving averages. Below $180, and range support at $160 is in play. General Electric (GE)What a wild ride this one has been on the past two days. Shares of General Electric (NYSE:GE) were pulverized on Thursday after a whistleblower cited concern over the company's accounting. The CEO shot back and put his money where his mouth is, buying $2 million worth of stock.The recent lows held well, as GE stock charges back toward $9. Now though, it's key to see if General Electric can reclaim the $9 to $9.25 area or if this zone acts as resistance. Deere (DE)Deere (NYSE:DE) stock is up almost 4% heading into the weekend after the company reported its quarterly results after the close. I don't love the set up in Deere, particularly given the current trading environment. However, shares did test roughly the same low for three straight sessions, all of which held.Anyone taking a long flyer on DE should note that level -- approximately $141 -- as their potential stop out mark. If shares break out over short-term downtrend resistance (blue line), a run to the 200-day is possible. If $142.50 holds as support, bulls can stay long.A breakdown below $141 could send DE stock down to $132.Bret Kenwell is the manager and author of Future Blue Chips and is on Twitter @BretKenwell. As of this writing, Bret Kenwell is long BAC, AMZN and GOOGL. More From InvestorPlace * 2 Toxic Pot Stocks You Should Avoid * 10 Cheap Dividend Stocks to Load Up On * The 10 Biggest Losers from Q2 Earnings * 5 Dependable Dividend Stocks to Buy The post 5 Top Stock Trades for Monday: AMD, BAC, FB, GE, DE appeared first on InvestorPlace.

  • David Tepper Invests in 2 Managed Care Companies in 2nd Quarter
    GuruFocus.com

    David Tepper Invests in 2 Managed Care Companies in 2nd Quarter

    Guru also buys satellite telecom company Continue reading...

  • Touch-Screens in Cars Don’t Make Us Safer – Yet
    Bloomberg

    Touch-Screens in Cars Don’t Make Us Safer – Yet

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Two years ago, 10 sailors died when the U.S. Navy’s guided missile destroyer USS John S. McCain collided with a chemical tanker off Singapore. An investigation has determined that insufficient training and inadequate operating procedures were to blame, and both factors were related to a new touch-screen-based helm control system. The Navy has decided to revert its destroyers back to entirely physical throttles and helm controls.It’s worth exploring the Navy’s rationale for installing touch-screens (“Just because you can doesn’t mean you should,” says Rear Admiral Bill Galinis), as well as its rationale for getting rid of them:Galinis said that bridge design is something that shipbuilders have a lot of say in, as it’s not covered by any particular specification that the Navy requires builders to follow. As a result of innovation and a desire to incorporate new technology, “we got away from the physical throttles, and that was probably the number-one feedback from the fleet – they said, just give us the throttles that we can use.”There are lessons here — including a prescient one from 50 years ago — for other, more mundane transport-control interfaces as well.Large, interactive touch-screens are becoming increasingly prevalent in passenger cars; in the case of Tesla, they’re the only control interface. They’re lovely to look at, but as the Navy’s experience suggests, they might be more confusing than physical controls. That confusion isn’t academic, either: Distracted driving is an increasingly dangerous problem. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 10% of all fatal crashes from 2012 to 2017 involved distracted drivers. Mobile phones are a major cause of distraction, as we’d expect, but they’re an even bigger problem for younger drivers.Almost 50 years ago, robotics professor Masahiro Mori wrote an extraordinary essay, “The Uncanny Valley,” on people’s reactions to robots as they became more and more humanlike. As Mori said, our affinity for robots rises as they more closely resemble humans. That affinity plunges, becoming negative and finally rising again once a robot reaches the (possibly unattainable) full likeness of a human being.Something similar is at work in our current touch-screen-filled vehicles. To an extent, adding more screen real estate give us more information, and with it more safety — until it begins to provide an overwhelming amount of information and an overly complex set of choices for visual navigation. And moving from one information-rich interface to another is increasingly difficult, as another Navy rear admiral said in reviewing the John S. McCain collision:When you look at a screen, where do you find heading? Is it in the same place, or do you have to hunt every time you go to a different screen? So the more commonality we can drive into these kind of human-machine interfaces, the better it is for the operator to quickly pick up what the situational awareness is, whatever aspect he’s looking at, whether it’s helm control, radar pictures, whatever. So we’re trying to drive that.There are two ways our in-car screens could evolve. The first is that, for safety’s sake, they’ll move back down the curve, so to speak, and be less ambiguous and more full of knobs and dials and physical throttles. That’s the Navy’s new approach. The second, though, is that we won’t go back, at least in passenger applications, to a more tactile interface of specific controls. We’re probably going to get more screens, with more information. Maybe the only way out of this valley is to shift the interface completely to voice or, in the very long run, to obviate the issue by having cars drive themselves. That could be how we navigate this uncanny valley of vehicle interfaces — the removal of any need to control the vehicle at all, and the chance to fill our cars’ screens with pure entertainment. Weekend readingA greener energy industry is testing investors’ ability to adapt. One coal CEO says “make money while you can” in an industry that is in terminal decline. The venture capital arm of Royal Dutch Shell Plc has invested in Corvus Energy, a maritime and offshore battery systems company. America’s obsession with beef is killing leather. A look at how Phoenix comes alive at night, and how other cities might too in a hotter world. An exploration of how extreme climate change has arrived in America. The Anthropocene is a joke. On a geological time scale, human civilization is an event, not an epoch. Three years of misery inside Google, the happiest company in tech. Here’s what happens when Apple Inc. locks you out of its walled garden after fraud suspicions. Machine vision can spot unknown links between classic artworks. When Midwest startups sell, their hometown schools often lose. A programmer in California got a “NULL” vanity license plate in the hopes that the word would not compute in a database of traffic offenders. Instead, he was fined $12,049. Robert Ballard, discoverer of the Titanic, is exploring a startling clue that may help him find Amelia Earhart’s plane.   Bugatti’s one-off La Voiture Noire debuted at the Pebble Beach Concours D’Elegance. It’s already been sold, for $18.68 million. Bloomberg Businessweek’s Peter Coy looks back on the 40 years since the magazine declared “ the death of equities.” Get Sparklines delivered to your inbox. Sign up here. And subscribe to Bloomberg All Access and get much, much more. You’ll receive our unmatched global news coverage and two in-depth daily newsletters, the Bloomberg Open and the Bloomberg Close.To contact the author of this story: Nathaniel Bullard at nbullard@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Brooke Sample at bsample1@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Nathaniel Bullard is a BloombergNEF energy analyst, covering technology and business model innovation and system-wide resource transitions.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

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