GOOG Sep 2019 1180.000 put

OPR - OPR Delayed Price. Currency in USD
64.50
0.00 (0.00%)
As of 3:57PM EDT. Market open.
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Previous Close64.50
Open59.50
Bid0.00
Ask0.00
Strike1,180.00
Expire Date2019-09-20
Day's Range56.80 - 64.50
Contract RangeN/A
Volume10
Open InterestN/A
  • Google-Huawei dispute 'intimately connected' to Trump’s trade war: Expert
    Yahoo Finance16 hours ago

    Google-Huawei dispute 'intimately connected' to Trump’s trade war: Expert

    Google's move to revoke Huawei's operating license for Android is not really separate from the larger US-China trade dispute, according to one expert.

  • Trump blames China for changing trade deal
    Yahoo Finance Video18 hours ago

    Trump blames China for changing trade deal

    Trade tensions between China and the U.S.continue to escalate as the President calls out China for changing the rules. Yahoo Finance's Julie Hyman, Adam Shapiro, Brian Sozzi, and Andy Serwer disuss.

  • Why U.S.tech companies are distancing themselves from Huawei
    Yahoo Finance Video18 hours ago

    Why U.S.tech companies are distancing themselves from Huawei

    Tech companies are reportedly looking to unwind their businesses from Huawei. Yahoo Finance's Julie Hyman, Adam Shapiro, Dan Howley, Brian Sozzi, and Andy Serwer discuss.

  • Google’s move to pull Huawei's Android license is 'intimately connected' to US-China trade war
    Yahoo Finance Video20 hours ago

    Google’s move to pull Huawei's Android license is 'intimately connected' to US-China trade war

    Google reportedly pulled Huawei's Android license, but the U.S. tech giant is not alone, chipmakers like Intel and Qualcomm also reportedly pulled from Huawei. Parag Khanna, Author of ‘The Future is Asian’ tells Yahoo Finance that "It's not really separate from the trade war, after all, I think these are intimately connected issues." Khanna also touches upon the U.S. China trade war impact on Apple.

  • GDPR adtech complaints keep stacking up in Europe
    TechCrunch22 hours ago

    GDPR adtech complaints keep stacking up in Europe

    It's a year since Europe's General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) came intoforce and leaky adtech is now facing privacy complaints in four more EuropeanUnion markets

  • U.S. eases restrictions on Huawei; founder says U.S. underestimates Chinese firm
    Reuters26 minutes ago

    U.S. eases restrictions on Huawei; founder says U.S. underestimates Chinese firm

    NEW YORK/SHANGHAI (Reuters) - The United States has temporarily eased trade restrictions on China's Huawei to minimize disruption for its customers, a move the founder of the world's largest telecoms equipment maker said meant little because it was already prepared for U.S. action. The U.S. Commerce Department blocked Huawei Technologies Co Ltd from buying U.S. goods last week, saying the firm was involved in activities contrary to national security. The move came amid an escalating dispute over trade practices between the United States and China.

  • CNBC45 minutes ago

    Google reverses decision to cut ties with Huawei after US eases trade restrictions

    The U.S. Commerce Department announced Monday it had granted a 90-day license for mobile phone companies and internet broadband providers to work with Huawei to keep existing networks online and protect users from security risks. The exemption allows Google to send software updates to Huawei phones which use its Android operating system through to August 19. Alphabet GOOGL Inc's Google said Tuesday that it plans to work with China's Huawei over the next 90 days, shortly after the U.S. temporarily eased some trade restrictions on the world's second-largest smartphone maker.

  • CNBC2 hours ago

    Huawei's biggest problem is now uncertainty, analysts say

    The U.S. government's temporary easing of restrictions may bring little respite for Chinese telecommunications giant Huawei, analysts say. On Monday, the U.S. government announced that the Commerce Department will allow Huawei to purchase American-made goods in order to maintain existing networks and provide software updates to its existing handsets. The latest development came on the back of U.S. President Donald Trump's administration adding Huawei last week to a list that mandated a license for stateside companies if they want to do business with the Chinese company.

  • Financial Times3 hours ago

    FirstFT: Today’s top stories

    The licence, which will run for three months, would enable operations to continue for existing Huawei mobile phone users and rural broadband networks in the US. It comes after Huawei, the world’s second-largest smartphone maker, faces the prospect of being locked out of Google Android’s operating system after it was placed on a “banned entity” list by the White House.

  • AP Explains: US sanctions on Huawei bite, but who gets hurt?
    Associated Press3 hours ago

    AP Explains: US sanctions on Huawei bite, but who gets hurt?

    Trump administration sanctions against Huawei have begun to bite even though their dimensions remain unclear. U.S. companies that supply the Chinese tech powerhouse with computer chips saw their stock prices slump Monday, and Huawei faces decimated smartphone sales with the anticipated loss of Google's popular software and services. The U.S. move escalates trade-war tensions with Beijing, but also risks making China more self-sufficient over time.

  • The Tech Cold War Begins: How Big Tech is Affected
    Insider Monkey7 hours ago

    The Tech Cold War Begins: How Big Tech is Affected

    The tariff battle between China and U.S. has become more than just talk. After President Trump raised tariffs on hundreds of billions of dollars worth of imports from China, Trump has now targeted Huawei adding it to a trade blacklist. Huawei is a big company with around $100 billion in revenue last year. The intelligence community […]

  • Trump Ban Puts Huawei's Smartphone Plans in Jeopardy
    Bloomberg7 hours ago

    Trump Ban Puts Huawei's Smartphone Plans in Jeopardy

    China’s largest technology company told potential partners that by the end of 2018, it would have 50 million Europeans using its own app store, rather than Google’s, according to documents viewed by Bloomberg News. Huawei also held talks with European wireless carriers about spreading this new app store even further, people involved in those talks said.

  • Trade War Takes Its Toll on Tech Stocks
    Investopedia8 hours ago

    Trade War Takes Its Toll on Tech Stocks

    The trade war hit the tech sector directly as the S&P 500 saw a bearish continuation day, and rare earth metals may be next casualty.

  • U.S. Gives Limited Relief for Consumers, Carriers Using Huawei
    Bloomberg8 hours ago

    U.S. Gives Limited Relief for Consumers, Carriers Using Huawei

    The temporary license covers continued operation of existing networks and equipment as well as support to existing handsets and other limited actions, according to a notice published in the Federal Register Monday. “This license will allow operations to continue for existing Huawei mobile phone users and rural broadband networks,” Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross said in an emailed statement on Monday. The Trump Administration blacklisted Huawei on Friday, jeopardizing its supply of American components from semiconductors to the Google apps that run on its smartphones.

  • Slack non-IPO: 5 things to know about the direct listing
    MarketWatch12 hours ago

    Slack non-IPO: 5 things to know about the direct listing

    Slack Technologies Inc. is looking for a better direct-listing fate than Spotify Technology SA. The music-streaming service reminded tech unicorns late last year that companies don’t have to issue new shares or raise money through a traditional offering if they wish to go public, and now Slack is following in its footsteps. The business-chat company filed direct-listing paperwork on Friday.

  • Alarming Lessons From Facebook's Push to Stop Fake News in India
    Bloomberg12 hours ago

    Alarming Lessons From Facebook's Push to Stop Fake News in India

    The world’s largest election has become something of a test case in how technology giants handle fake news after years of scandal. India has as many as 900 million voters in an election that culminates this week, with Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s ruling coalition headed for apparent victory. Particularly challenging for would-be fact-checkers, from Facebook Inc. to Google, is the country’s 23 official languages.