GOOG Nov 2019 1060.000 call

OPR - OPR Delayed Price. Currency in USD
177.00
0.00 (0.00%)
As of 1:40PM EDT. Market open.
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Previous Close177.00
Open177.00
Bid193.00
Ask202.50
Strike1,060.00
Expire Date2019-11-15
Day's Range177.00 - 177.00
Contract RangeN/A
Volume1
Open Interest17
  • Streaming roundup: Quibi sells out $150 million in first-year ads
    American City Business Journals

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  • Barrons.com

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  • Facebook is challenging our democracy: Author Matt Stoller
    Yahoo Finance

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    MarketWatch

    Google touts quantum computing milestone

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  • Bitcoin Tumbles to 5-Month Low as Libra Hit by U.S. Backlash
    Bloomberg

    Bitcoin Tumbles to 5-Month Low as Libra Hit by U.S. Backlash

    (Bloomberg) -- The hostility toward Facebook’s Libra cryptocurrency appears to be weighing on the sentiment for Bitcoin.The world’s largest cryptocurrency dropped as much as 10% to $7,305 in New York, the lowest level since May. Other digital tokens such as Ether and Litecoin, which dropped 11% and 13% respectively, slumped even more as Facebook Chief Executive Officer Mark Zuckerberg testified before the House Financial Services Committee on Wednesday.“The biggest thing behind this is that volumes have been very very low,” said Josh Lim, head of trading strategy at Galaxy Digital in New York. “On the sentiment side of things, the fact that the Libra coalition has faced some major challenges and the Telegram launch was halted by the SEC, it really curtailed investor appetite for crypto broadly.”Potentially adding to concern is the news that Alphabet Inc.’s Google has built a computer that’s reached “quantum supremacy,” performing a computation in 200 seconds that would take the fastest supercomputers about 10,000 years. Skeptics of cryptocurrencies have noted that advances in computing could make the slower proof of work system used by Bitcoin and other tokens obsolete.As often the case with cryptocurrencies, traders pointed to an array of potential catalysts beside Libra for the sudden spike down in prices around 8:30 a.m. New York time. Among the reasons cited were liquidation of futures contracts on exchanges such as BitMex, the stablecoin Tether trading at a discount to parity and a general lack of liquidity among cryptocurrencies.“The fact that this is losing so much momentum so quickly is telling people that Bitcoin as a widely accepted currency is going to take longer than they were hoping,” said Matt Maley, equity strategist at Miller Tabak + Co.\--With assistance from Alastair Marsh.To contact the reporters on this story: Claire Ballentine in New York at cballentine@bloomberg.net;Olga Kharif in Portland at okharif@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Jeremy Herron at jherron8@bloomberg.net, Dave Liedtka, Brendan WalshFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Explainer: Google hails 'quantum supremacy', but don't chuck out your PC just yet
    Reuters

    Explainer: Google hails 'quantum supremacy', but don't chuck out your PC just yet

    Researchers at Google say they have achieved 'quantum supremacy', in which a computer harnessing the properties of sub-atomic particles did a far better job of solving a problem than the world's most powerful supercomputer. Given the task of finding a pattern in a seemingly random series of numbers, Google's quantum computer produced an answer in 3 minutes and 20 seconds. It estimates that the Summit supercomputer https://www.ibm.com/thought-leadership/summit-supercomputer at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee would take 10,000 years to complete the task.

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  • Reuters

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  • Adam Neumann’s Era of Excess and Eccentricity Is Over at WeWork
    Bloomberg

    Adam Neumann’s Era of Excess and Eccentricity Is Over at WeWork

    (Bloomberg) -- It was just weeks ago that Adam Neumann was running one of the world’s most valuable startups. As chief executive officer of WeWork, he was on the verge of an initial public offering of a venture once valued at $47 billion.Today, in a remarkable fall from grace, the office-sharing company that he co-founded in 2010, the one he promised would elevate the world’s consciousness, is no longer his.SoftBank Group Corp., the company’s largest investor, unveiled Wednesday in Tokyo a multibillion-dollar rescue package that nets it 80% of WeWork, part of a desperately needed lifeline. It brings an end to an era marked by lavish spending and self-dealing that deepened the company’s losses and eroded investors’ faith in Neumann’s ability to lead. Even with the capital infusion and new ownership, it also leaves WeWork beset by woes that include sagging morale, landlord unrest and tens of billions of dollars in rent payments.“Obviously the biggest challenge is just steadying the ship,” said Duncan Clark, chairman of BDA China, an advisory firm. “Can the company remain solvent? It’s a race against time to trim costs, sell assets, change culture.”The rescue package is personally humbling for the 40-year-old Neumann, a natural showman with a penchant for speaking in grandiose terms about changing the world while doling out shots of tequila in the workplace. But it’s also poised to make him a very rich man.Read more: WeWork Taps ‘Adult in Room,’ Ex-Amazon Exec to Replace NeumannIn an unusual deal that is almost certain to spark the ire of WeWork staffers being dismissed by the thousands, Neumann will walk away with as much as $1.2 billion as well as a $500 million credit line from SoftBank, after it pushed him out as chief executive officer last month. He’ll remain as a board observer and can assign two board seats upon repayment of the drawn amount of his outstanding credit line, which is currently about $395 million, said a person with knowledge of the matter.The deal gives WeWork a second chance at least in the short-term. SoftBank will soon provide WeWork with $1.5 billion, accelerating a financing agreement that was originally scheduled for April. SoftBank is also organizing a $5 billion debt package, which will include contributions from SoftBank itself, Mizuho Financial Group Inc. and other lenders.Emblematic of high-flying, growth-at-all-costs unicorns, WeWork’s never made a penny in profits, losing $900 million in the first half of this year. Burning through cash since its inception, it faced a crunch that could have left the company short of funds as soon as next month. Much of that binge stems from Neumann, a fierce and unpredictable negotiator unafraid of spending his way to growth: In the past nine years, WeWork has opened 425 office locations in 36 countries, become Manhattan’s biggest tenant, and upended the stodgy world of commercial real estate.Serious questions remain about its business model of renting and renovating office space that it leases to individuals and companies. That strategy has made it the biggest private office tenant in cities like New York and London. But it’s also left it in a precarious position. It has some $47 billion of future rent payments due and some $1 billion in renovation costs.Landlords and tenants have become cautious when dealing with the firm. Google has walked away from a potential Toronto lease and landlords are reaching out to WeWork rivals to see if they will take over WeWork leases or buildings if it becomes necessary.SoftBank also must grapple with reducing costs including a workforce of more than 12,000 people that had grown bloated under Neumann. WeWork already plans to lay off 2,000 people and sell some non-core businesses.Even as it reduces the workforce, SoftBank will also need to deal with growing dissatisfaction among employees, some of whom have worked for years in anticipation of an initial public offering that never materialized. At least five C-level executives have headed for the exits in recent weeks, and some staffers, unsure of their fate, stopped reporting for duty altogether, people familiar with the situation said last week.As part of the package, SoftBank executive, Marcelo Claure, will take over as chairman of WeWork’s board. WeWork appointed Artie Minson and Sebastian Gunningham as co-CEOs last month after investors pushed back against the IPO.Even before the bailout, the Japanese conglomerate had committed more than $10 billion to the company. As its estimated valuation cratered, WeWork last month ousted Neumann as CEO and, eventually, pulled its IPO in the face of investors who balked at its losses and corporate governance.The debacle has been an embarrassment for SoftBank. It valued WeWork at $47 billion as recently as the start of the year. Already, SoftBank has invested more than WeWork is estimated to be worth without its latest capital infusion-- about $8 billion.Under the deal, Neumann is allowed to sell a little under $1 billion of stock to the Japanese conglomerate, said people familiar with the matter. Neumann currently owns 22% of WeWork. It couldn’t immediately be learned what his stake will fall to after any sale to SoftBank. He will also get a roughly $185 million consulting fee.SoftBank and JPMorgan declined to comment. WeWork couldn’t immediately be reached.SoftBank’s stock purchase from Neumann is part of a broader offer to buy as much as $3 billion from existing shareholders. The $500 million credit line for Neumann will be secured by some of his stock. And a $500 million loan to Neumann extended by JPMorgan, UBS and Credit Suisse will be repaid, one of the people said.When Neumann stepped down from the CEO role, it triggered terms of the loan that would have put him in technical default, according to a person familiar with the matter.JPMorgan had been pitching a $5 billion debt package for WeWork. Last week, the company had been leaning toward the bank’s plan over SoftBank’s, because it wouldn’t dilute existing shareholders or force the startup to cede control.But disagreements over the company’s valuation -- JPMorgan’s plan had pegged WeWork about $5 billion -- pushed the company toward SoftBank, which was willing to increase its equity stake and provide a payout to Neumann, according to a person familiar with the situation.For his part, SoftBank chief Masayoshi Son is showing signs of contrition for the role he played in inflating WeWork’s valuation. On a call Monday, Son apologized to investors in the first Vision Fund, which injected capital into WeWork at a valuation of north of $21 billion in 2017, according to a person briefed on the matter.(Updates with details of Neumann’s debt in the sixth paragraph.)\--With assistance from Candy Cheng.To contact the reporters on this story: Gillian Tan in New York at gtan129@bloomberg.net;Michelle F. Davis in New York at mdavis194@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Tom Giles at tgiles5@bloomberg.net, Larry ReibsteinFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Is Elon Musk Right about Tesla’s Self-Driving Timeline?
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  • Reuters

    UPDATE 2-Google unveils computer with 'quantum supremacy', rivals say wait a qubit

    Alphabet Inc's Google said on Wednesday it achieved a breakthrough in computing research by using a quantum computer to solve in minutes a complex problem that would take today's most powerful supercomputer thousands of years to crack. Google researchers expect that quantum computers within a few years will fuel advancements in fields such as artificial intelligence, materials science and chemistry.

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  • Slack Tumbles to a New Low despite Key Update
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    On October 22, Slack stock fell 6.9% to end the trading day at $21.03. On the day, the stock hit its all-time low of $20.93 and then recovered slightly.

  • Google unveils computer with 'quantum supremacy', rivals say wait a qubit
    Reuters

    Google unveils computer with 'quantum supremacy', rivals say wait a qubit

    Alphabet Inc's Google said on Wednesday it achieved a breakthrough in computing research by using a quantum computer to solve in minutes a complex problem that would take today's most powerful supercomputer thousands of years to crack. Google researchers expect that quantum computers within a few years will fuel advancements in fields such as artificial intelligence, materials science and chemistry. The company is racing rivals including IBM Corp and Microsoft Corp to be the first to commercialize the technology and sell it through cloud computing units.

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  • Bloomberg

    Google Says Quantum Computer Beat 10,000-Year Task in Minutes

    (Bloomberg) -- Alphabet Inc.’s Google said it’s built a computer that’s reached “quantum supremacy,” performing a computation in 200 seconds that would take the fastest supercomputers about 10,000 years.The results of Google’s tests, which were conducted using a quantum chip it developed in-house, were published Wednesday in the scientific journal Nature.“This achievement is the result of years of research and the dedication of many people,” Google engineering director Hartmut Neven said in a blog post. “It’s also the beginning of a new journey: figuring out how to put this technology to work. We’re working with the research community and have open-sourced tools to enable others to work alongside us to identify new applications.”The idea behind quantum computing is to exponentially improve the processing speed and power of computers to be able to simulate large systems, driving advances in physics, chemistry and other fields. Rather than storing information in binary 0s or 1s like classical computers, quantum computers rely on “qubits”, which can be both 0 and 1 simultaneously, dramatically increasing the amount of information that can be encoded.But, much like advancements in artificial intelligence, there’s a lot of debate about what constitutes a real breakthrough. Researchers at International Business Machines Corp. said in a blog this week that a simulation of the same task Google used could be done in 2.5 days on a classical computer with enough hard drive storage, not 10,000 years. If quantum supremacy means doing something classical computers can’t, this isn’t it, they wrote.While the world’s biggest tech companies are racing to develop a quantum computer that passes the scrutiny of academics, some products are commercially available already. In 2011, Canada’s D-Wave Systems Inc. became the first company to sell such a product to businesses and government labs, although unlike machines being built by rivals, its usefulness is limited as the hardware can’t solve any kind of mathematical problem.A number of other companies -- including IBM, Google, Microsoft Corp., and California-based startup Rigetti Computing -- are pushing to create more powerful machines that businesses can use. They’ve also made some of their technology available for researchers to experiment with via the internet.To contact the reporter on this story: Amy Thomson in London at athomson6@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Giles Turner at gturner35@bloomberg.net, Nate Lanxon, Peter ChapmanFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Antitrust fears muted as Amazon, Apple, Google and Facebook approach earnings
    MarketWatch

    Antitrust fears muted as Amazon, Apple, Google and Facebook approach earnings

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  • Barrons.com

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  • MarketWatch

    Google says it's made a breakthrough in quantum computing

    Alphabet's Google said it's made a breakthrough in quantum computing, known as quantum supremacy. In a blog post, Google said it's developed a new 54-qubit processor that performed a target computation in 200 seconds, which would take the world's fastest supercomputer 10,000 years to produce a similar output. Naturepublished a paper on Google's achievement.

  • Barrons.com

    Microsoft Reports Earnings Late Wednesday. Here’s How to Play It.

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  • Benzinga

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  • Google claims "quantum supremacy"
    Reuters Videos

    Google claims "quantum supremacy"

    Google achieved what it calls a breakthrough in computer research using this odd-looking metal cylinder full of wires and wafers. CEO Sundar Pichai: SOUNDBITE: GOOGLE CEO, SUNDAR PICHAI, (ENGLISH) SAYING: "It can perform a computation in seconds, what would take the world's fastest supercomputer thousands of years to do that same calculation. In the field, this is known as quantum supremacy, and it's a really important milestone." Official confirmation of the breakthrough in quantum computing came in a paper published in the science journal Nature, after weeks of controversy following the leak of a draft, over whether Google's claim of "quantum supremacy" was valid. But there's a catch: Quantum researchers need to cool the qubits to close to absolute zero to limit vibration - or "noise" - that causes errors to creep into their calculations. It's in this extremely challenging task that the research team at Google, a unit of Alphabet Inc, has made significant progress. Some skeptics say Google is over-selling its achievment. Archrival IBM says quantum computers will work in concert with classical computers and won't reign supreme over them. It contends a supercomputer with additional storage can solve the same problem with greater accuracy - in 2-1/2 days at most. ------------------ Google achieved what it calls a breakthrough in computer research using this odd-looking metal cylinder full of wires and wafers. CEO Sundar Pichai: SOUNDBITE: GOOGLE CEO, SUNDAR PICHAI, (ENGLISH) SAYING: "It can perform a computation in seconds, what would take the world's fastest supercomputer thousands of years to do that same calculation. In the field, this is known as quantum supremacy, and it's a really important milestone." By contrast, traditional computers do their calculations by processing bits of data using ones and zeroes. Quantum computing uses quantum bits called qubits that can be both one and zero simultaneously. To eliminate errors in calculations, researchers need to cool the qubits close to absolute zero. That's where Google has made big progress. But skeptics say Google is over-selling its achievment. Archrival IBM says quantum computers will work in concert with classical computers and won't reign supreme over them. It contends a supercomputer with additional storage can solve the same problem with greater accuracy - in 2-1/2 days at most.