GOOG Jan 2020 860.000 put

OPR - OPR Delayed Price. Currency in USD
0.7500
0.0000 (0.00%)
As of 2:53PM EDT. Market open.
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous Close0.7500
Open0.5000
Bid0.0000
Ask0.0000
Strike860.00
Expire Date2020-01-17
Day's Range0.5000 - 0.7500
Contract RangeN/A
Volume6
Open InterestN/A
  • Is Google Stadia the Future of Gaming?
    Meredith Videos

    Is Google Stadia the Future of Gaming?

    Or will it go the way of Google Glass?

  • Google Launches Stadia Gaming Service
    Bloomberg

    Google Launches Stadia Gaming Service

    Nov.19 -- Google's streaming game platform Stadia is now live. Access to games will start at just under $10 a month. Kenny Rosenblatt, Arkadium president, appears on "Bloomberg Technology."

  • Investopedia

    Tech Stocks Racing Toward Best Gains in Decade Despite Red Flags

    Tech stocks are leading the market by a wide margin in 2019, but Q3 2019 profit declines and high valuations are causes for concern.

  • Sony in Talks to Buy Stake in Ambani’s TV Network
    Bloomberg

    Sony in Talks to Buy Stake in Ambani’s TV Network

    (Bloomberg) -- Sony Corp. is in talks to acquire a stake in the Indian television network controlled by billionaire Mukesh Ambani, as the Japanese giant seeks to tap booming demand for content in the South Asian nation, according to people familiar with the matter.The Tokyo-based company is currently conducting due diligence on Ambani’s Network18 Media & Investments Ltd. before any possible offer, the people said, asking not to be named as the information is not public. Sony is considering several potential deal structures, including a bid for the company or a merger of its own Indian business with Network18’s entertainment channels, one of the people said.Talks are at a preliminary stage and may not result in a transaction, the people said. Shares of Network18 surged as much as 19% in Mumbai on Thursday, while unit TV18 Broadcast Ltd. jumped 9.7%.While a successful deal may help Sony bolster its local offerings and take on upstart rivals such as Netflix Inc., it will give Ambani access to international content. The Indian tycoon’s wireless carrier, Reliance Jio Infocomm Ltd., has spent almost $50 billion in the past few years on its network to disrupt India’s telecommunications industry and has been luring users by offering local and overseas programming.“Our company evaluates various opportunities on an ongoing basis,” a spokesman for Ambani’s Reliance Industries Ltd., said in an email, declining to comment further. Representatives for Sony in India and Japan didn’t immediately respond to requests for comments.The talks come at a time when competition is heating up for paying viewers in a potentially lucrative market with more than half a billion smartphone users. Streaming companies such as Netflix to Amazon.com Inc. Prime are increasingly offering programs created locally to lure subscribers. Ambani’s Jio, while having the technology platform, is limited by the paucity of content it can stream, making such a deal with Sony crucial.“India is a massive OTT market, and any international OTT play will need to bolster its local strategy,” said Utkarsh Sinha, managing director at Bexley Advisors, a boutique firm in Mumbai, referring to over-the-top or streaming media services. “More partnerships or strategic alliances like this are likely in the next year or so.”Inside the Most Watched YouTube Channel in the WorldReliance Industries, the oil-to-petrochemicals conglomerate, unveiled plans last month to set up a digital-services holding company to fulfill the mogul’s ambitions for an e-commerce platform aimed at taking on the likes of Amazon.com and Walmart Inc.’s Flipkart Online Services Pvt.Sony operates in the South Asian country through Sony Pictures Networks India, which has a bouquet of channels including Sony Entertainment Television, reaching over 700 million viewers in India.TV18 Broadcast owns and operates 56 channels in India spanning news and entertainment. It also caters to the global Indian diaspora through 16 international channels.(Updates with analyst’s comment in seventh paragraph)To contact the reporters on this story: Baiju Kalesh in Mumbai at bkalesh@bloomberg.net;Anto Antony in Mumbai at aantony1@bloomberg.net;P R Sanjai in Mumbai at psanjai@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Fion Li at fli59@bloomberg.net, ;Sam Nagarajan at samnagarajan@bloomberg.net, Arijit GhoshFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Factbox: How social media services handle political ads
    Reuters

    Factbox: How social media services handle political ads

    Online platforms including Facebook and Alphabet Inc's Google face growing pressure to stop carrying political ads that contain false or misleading claims ahead of the U.S. presidential election. Facebook exempts politicians from its third-party fact-checking program, allowing them to run ads with false claims.

  • Amnesty International blasts Facebook, Google as human rights abusers
    MarketWatch

    Amnesty International blasts Facebook, Google as human rights abusers

    It says the two most dominant internet corporations should be compelled to abandon what it calls their surveillance-based business model, saying it is “predicated on human rights abuse.”

  • Google to limit targeting of political ads
    MarketWatch

    Google to limit targeting of political ads

    Google is making it harder for political advertisers to target specific types of people. The company said that as of January, advertisers will only be able to target U.S. political ads based on broad categories such as gender, age and postal code. Currently, ads can be tailored for more specific groups — for instance, using information gleaned from public voter logs, such as political affiliation.

  • Financial Times

    Google curbs targeted political advertising in run-up to UK poll

    Google has said that political advertisers will no longer be able to narrowly target users through their characteristics such as interests or email addresses, in a shake-up to its policies just weeks before the UK’s general election. Alphabet’s search platform said in a blog post on Wednesday that political advertisers will now only be able to target audiences by age, gender and general location at the postcode level. Google said it would introduce the rules in the UK within a week, ahead of the country’s general election on December 12.

  • Google, Facebook at Center of Rising Political-Ad Tensions
    Bloomberg

    Google, Facebook at Center of Rising Political-Ad Tensions

    (Bloomberg) -- Facebook Inc. and Google were drawn into an escalating battle of wills Wednesday over the use of political advertising on social media.Trump campaign officials pressured Facebook to maintain its permissive political advertising rules, while Alphabet Inc.’s Google announced an overhaul of how campaigns may target their messages across the world’s largest search engine.The ability of candidates to show different messages to people based on their physical location, age, or other characteristic, referred to as micro-targeting, has become an increasing focus of the broader debate about political advertising online. Last month, Twitter Inc. said it will ban political ads on its platform altogether, and is restricting targeting for other ads related to some politically charged issues, like climate change.Google on Wednesday said it will ban candidates from targeting election ads based on people’s political affiliation, though the messages can be tailored based on gender, age and geography. The company also is eliminating a feature called Customer Match for political advertisers. The tool lets marketers upload their own lists of email addresses or phone numbers, and target ads specifically at those people.Facebook, the largest platform for online political advertising, has been under pressure to follow suit. Several prominent Democrats have attacked the company for refusing to fact-check political ads. Facebook has rebuffed those calls, saying it doesn’t want to police political speech. In October, hundreds of Facebook employees sent a letter to the company’s executives calling for new limits on ad targeting for political campaigns. The letter became public after it was obtained by the New York Times.Carolyn Everson, a Facebook vice president, said Monday at a Recode conference that the social-media company wasn’t considering changes to its targeted advertising options for political ads. Later that day, however, she told Axios, the news website, that Facebook hadn’t ruled out any specific changes, raising the prospect the company may change course and limit targeting in some way.The Trump campaign reacted directly to Everson’s comments. It sees Facebook as an essential tool for speaking directly to voters, instead of relying on critical media outlets that the president says treat him unfairly.Gary Coby, the Trump campaign’s digital director, argued on Twitter Wednesday that stopping campaigns from pairing in-house data with Facebook’s advertising tools would suppress voter engagement. “This would unevenly hurt the little guy, smaller voices, & issues the public is not aware of OR news is NOT covering,” Coby tweeted, saying it was very “dangerous” and a “huge blow to speech.”Tim Cameron, chief executive officer at FlexPoint Media, a Republican media strategy firm, said the Trump campaign is likely concerned that new restrictions could result in Facebook deciding to begin fact-checking political ads. “I think the Trump campaign is looking down the road beyond this decision and are actually more afraid of subsequent decisions that Facebook may make,” he said.Facebook hasn’t announced any changes to its policies. “For over a year, we’ve provided unprecedented transparency into all U.S. federal and state campaigns -- and we prohibit voter suppression in all ads,” a company spokesman said. “As we’ve said, we are looking at different ways we might refine our approach to political ads.”During the 2016 election, the Trump campaign ran 5.9 million different versions of ads, constantly testing them against different groups to increase engagement, according to internal Facebook documents reviewed by Bloomberg in 2018. It spent $44 million on Facebook in the six months before the 2016 election. So far in 2019, the Trump campaign has spent more than $15 million in ads, and is the largest political spender on the platform, according to Facebook’s political ad library.Before Google announced its changes, the company touted its ability to target voters based on political affiliations, like “right-leaning,” as a major selling point. “They were all heartily selling us this for years as the coolest thing since sliced bread,” said Will Ritter, the founder of Poolhouse, a political advertising firm.Google’s new restrictions mean campaigns may have to spend more after losing the ability to hit key voters, Ritter added. For instance, a candidate could identify frequent Republican voters in Democratic-heavy areas of the country, and reach them with ads on search and YouTube. Now they can’t.“It’s just going to increase costs because there’s going to be so much waste,” Ritter said.Irene Knapp, a former Google employee who now works for Tech Inquiry, a political advocacy group focused on ethical issues related to technology, said the ability to target makes online advertising particularly susceptible to abuse. Campaigns can test messages on certain audiences, find which ones resonate, then use tools provided by Facebook or Google to target those people with new ads while also reaching people with similar characteristics. Misleading messaging can be directed at specific audiences without drawing widespread attention.“You can be seeing one message that seems fine, and your next-door neighbor can be seeing some misinformation that is cleverly targeted to produce a very different response or action,” Knapp said.Knapp said Google’s Customer Match tool could be used to target racial groups, or engage in other behavior that violates the policies of the platforms. The equivalent tool on Facebook, “Custom Audiences,” still exists.(Updates with details on Google rules in the fourth paragraph.)\--With assistance from Alistair Barr.To contact the reporters on this story: Eric Newcomer in San Francisco at enewcomer@bloomberg.net;Kurt Wagner in San Francisco at kwagner71@bloomberg.net;Mark Bergen in San Francisco at mbergen10@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Jillian Ward at jward56@bloomberg.net, Andrew PollackFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Google to let sites block personalized ads under California privacy law
    Reuters

    Google to let sites block personalized ads under California privacy law

    Websites and apps using Google's advertising tools will be able to block personalized ads to internet users in California and elsewhere as part of the Alphabet Inc unit's effort to help them comply with the state's new privacy law, it told clients this week. The California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA), which goes into effect on Jan. 1, requires large businesses to let consumers opt out of the sale of their personal data. Lobbying by internet companies earlier this year failed to have the law exclude personalized ads, leaving the most popular and lucrative online ads in jeopardy.

  • Reuters

    UPDATE 4-Google bars elections ads from using political leanings, voter data

    Alphabet Inc's Google will stop giving advertisers the ability to target election ads using data such as public voter records and general political affiliations, the company said in a blog post on Wednesday. The move coincides with pressure on social media platforms over their handling of political advertising ahead of the U.S. presidential election in 2020. Google said it would limit audience targeting for election ads to age, gender and general location at a postal code level.

  • Google bars elections ads from using political leanings, voter data
    Reuters

    Google bars elections ads from using political leanings, voter data

    The move coincides with pressure on social media platforms over their handling of political advertising ahead of the U.S. presidential election in 2020. Google said it would limit audience targeting for election ads to age, gender and general location at a postal code level. Google will enforce the new approach in the United Kingdom within a week, ahead of the Dec. 12 general election.

  • Booking Holdings and Expedia in Arms Race to Deliver the Connected Trip
    Skift

    Booking Holdings and Expedia in Arms Race to Deliver the Connected Trip

    High-stake online travel agency competition used to merely revolve around how many tens of thousands of hotels, or homes and apartments each company added to its ranks during the previous quarter, and those milestones are still very much in play. But lately a new and somewhat more esoteric flashpoint has emerged, namely the connected trip. […]

  • U.S. lawmakers question Google about collection of health records
    Reuters

    U.S. lawmakers question Google about collection of health records

    U.S. Presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren along with fellow Senators Richard Blumenthal and Bill Cassidy wrote a letter to Alphabet's Google on Wednesday to raise questions about its access to the health records of tens of millions of Americans. Warren and Blumenthal, who are Democrats, along with Cassidy, a Republican, were focussed on a business partnership that Google formed with Ascension Health.

  • Streaming Cools Off and Gaming Warms Up
    Zacks

    Streaming Cools Off and Gaming Warms Up

    Let's review. Disney+ is killing it and the video game field is about to get more muddy. We've made some smart moves, let's predict the future.

  • TheStreet.com

    [video]Alphabet's Google to Impose Some Limits on Political Ads

    Alphabet's Google unit said Wednesday it will impose some limits on political advertising by the beginning of 2020. The move follows Twitter's outright ban on political ads, going into effect this month.

  • Glenn Greenberg Exits Facebook, Trims Alphabet
    GuruFocus.com

    Glenn Greenberg Exits Facebook, Trims Alphabet

    Guru's largest sales of the 3rd quarter Continue reading...

  • Google Stadia is not the cloud gaming future we were promised
    Quartz

    Google Stadia is not the cloud gaming future we were promised

    Google Stadia, the subscription-based streaming game service, launched Nov. 19, and it’s already off to a rough start. Video quality, which Stadia automatically adjusts based on your connection speed, would regularly drop down for some players to 720p, well below the 4K resolution the service is supposed to be able to handle. Stadia’s response has been to point users to its website.

  • Gaming startup Bunch scores funds from Supercell, Tencent and others
    American City Business Journals

    Gaming startup Bunch scores funds from Supercell, Tencent and others

    Venture capital firms are typically the main contributors of funding for startups. The app company, which specializes in integrating social networking and video into smartphone games, confirmed Wednesday that it raised $3.85 million from Supercell, Tencent, Riot Games, Miniclip and Colopl Next — all key players in the mobile gaming space. The effort brings Bunch's total funding to more than $8.5 million.

  • 50 Best ESG Companies: A List Of Today's Top Stocks For Environmental, Social And Governance Values
    Investor's Business Daily

    50 Best ESG Companies: A List Of Today's Top Stocks For Environmental, Social And Governance Values

    Finding strong stocks with solid growth needn't be a tradeoff with your environmental, social and governance values. Check out these 50 Best ESG Companies.

  • Business Wire

    NetApp and Google Cloud Advance Strategic Partnership to Drive Innovation in the Cloud

    NetApp (NTAP), the data authority for hybrid cloud, and Google Cloud (NASDAQ: GOOG, GOOGL) today announced the general availability of NetApp® Cloud Volumes Service, NetApp Cloud Volumes ONTAP® for Google Cloud, and support for Anthos on NetApp HCI to help organizations focus on innovation across any hybrid environments.