GOOG Jan 2020 1225.000 put

OPR - OPR Delayed Price. Currency in USD
9.90
+0.90 (+10.00%)
As of 10:35AM EST. Market open.
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous Close9.00
Open9.90
Bid9.50
Ask10.20
Strike1,225.00
Expire Date2020-01-17
Day's Range9.90 - 9.90
Contract RangeN/A
Volume3
Open InterestN/A
  • Cloud-based gaming kicks off for Google as Stadia premiers
    Yahoo Finance Video

    Cloud-based gaming kicks off for Google as Stadia premiers

    Google Stadia has officially launched on Monday. The cloud based gaming service has 22 games for its players to stream. But can Stadia and your wifi operate at a usable pace? Yahoo Finance’s Dan Howley shares his review on with Jen Rodgers and Dan Roberts on "The Final Round."

  • Google Stadia review: The game streaming service works — but it’s missing key features
    Yahoo Finance

    Google Stadia review: The game streaming service works — but it’s missing key features

    Google's Stadia game streaming service works incredibly well, but it's a work in progress.

  • Did Booking.com Swallow Kayak? No, It’s Just a Marketing Thing
    Skift

    Did Booking.com Swallow Kayak? No, It’s Just a Marketing Thing

    For at least the past three months, U.S.-based Kayak and OpenTable have branded themselves atop their homepages as being "Part of Booking.com," all three of which are sister companies within parent Booking Holdings. There's apparently a marketing motive behind the new cozy branding. The parent company, Booking Holdings, wants to parlay the U.S. brand recognition […]

  • U.S. Congress seeks answers on patient privacy in Google, Ascension cloud deal
    Reuters

    U.S. Congress seeks answers on patient privacy in Google, Ascension cloud deal

    Four Democratic leaders on the U.S. House of Representatives Energy and Commerce committee on Monday wrote Alphabet Inc's Google and Ascension Health demanding briefings by Dec. 6 on how patient data the hospital chain is storing on the cloud is used. Google's cloud computing unit said last week that it has incorporated industry standard security and privacy practices into its deal with Ascension, and that none of the data is being used for advertising purposes.

  • Barrons.com

    Retirement Savers Are Turning to Dividend Stocks for Income. Here’s How to Use Them in Your Portfolio.

    Investors are increasingly turning to equities with cash payouts for their nest eggs. But the strategies carry risk if not done right.

  • Marissa Mayer is back with a new startup focusing on artificial intelligence
    MarketWatch

    Marissa Mayer is back with a new startup focusing on artificial intelligence

    Mayer has been tight-lipped about her new venture, Lumi Labs, which is focused on building A.I. applications for consumers.

  • The Funded: Bill.com rings up $100M IPO, Google buys Santa Clara cloud startup
    American City Business Journals

    The Funded: Bill.com rings up $100M IPO, Google buys Santa Clara cloud startup

    Bay Area startup news at the start of the week included Bill.com's plans to raise $100 million in an IPO and Google's acquisition of a Santa Clara cloud management startup.

  • Mason Hawkins Sells Alphabet, General Electric
    GuruFocus.com

    Mason Hawkins Sells Alphabet, General Electric

    Guru's largest sales of the 3rd quarter Continue reading...

  • Turn yourself into a better investor by learning from hedge-fund star Jim Simons’s successes and failures
    MarketWatch

    Turn yourself into a better investor by learning from hedge-fund star Jim Simons’s successes and failures

    Renaissance’s Jim Simons crushes both the S&P 500 index and successful investors like Warren Buffett and George Soros.

  • Google Makes Another Cloud Acquisition During Antitrust Probe
    Bloomberg

    Google Makes Another Cloud Acquisition During Antitrust Probe

    (Bloomberg) -- Google announced plans to buy enterprise software firm CloudSimple Inc., another sign the search giant isn’t letting a flurry of antitrust investigations interrupt its expansion strategy.CloudSimple will join Google Cloud, a priority business for the Alphabet Inc. unit. The companies didn’t disclose financial terms.The acquisition could help Google get a foothold in a corner of the cloud-computing market where larger rivals, Microsoft Corp. and Amazon.com Inc., have run ahead. CloudSimple builds tools that help companies move information, applications, databases and other systems from in-house data centers to the public cloud.The Santa Clara, California-based startup specializes in VMware virtualization software, which helps businesses run corporate networks and business software more efficiently. VMWare’s large enterprise customer base has made it an attractive partner for the leading public cloud providers, including Google.In a Google blog post announcing the deal, Ajay Patel, a VMware Inc. senior vice president, said his company will continue to work with CloudSimple.In recent months, U.S. regulators and Congress have opened multiple inquiries into Google over competition concerns, including the company’s history of acquisitions. Since those probes began, Google has announced multibillion-dollar takeovers of Looker Data Sciences Inc., a cloud company, and Fitbit Inc., a device-maker.Google has argued that it has a small market share in cloud computing, enterprise software and consumer devices. Antitrust officials cleared Google’s $2.6 billion bid for Looker in early November.To contact the reporters on this story: Mark Bergen in San Francisco at mbergen10@bloomberg.net;Nico Grant in San Francisco at ngrant20@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Jillian Ward at jward56@bloomberg.net, Alistair Barr, Andrew PollackFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • FTC chief says has 'multiple' investigations of tech platforms
    Reuters

    FTC chief says has 'multiple' investigations of tech platforms

    The chairman of the Federal Trade Commission said on Monday that his agency had multiple investigations of tech platforms, in addition to its known probe of Facebook, but did not identify them. Big tech companies like Facebook, Alphabet's Google, Amazon.com and Apple face a slew of antitrust probes by the federal government, state attorneys general and congress. It has previously been reported that the FTC's focus was on Facebook and Amazon.com.

  • Getting a Grip on the Pentagon
    Bloomberg

    Getting a Grip on the Pentagon

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- How do you wrestle an unwieldy, $700 billion behemoth into submission?  That was the challenge facing Ash Carter, former secretary of the Department of Defense and this week's guest on Masters in Business.Carter, who has worked with every president from Ronald Reagan to Barack Obama, says his background in theoretical physics and medieval history helped him understand how to maneuver through the labyrinthine systems of the Pentagon bureaucracy. He created processes to improve purchasing efficiency, including incentives and penalties for major weapons manufacturers. He also brought talent from Silicon Valley to the Pentagon to beef up its technological capabilities.Carter describes his role after 9/11 in coordinating U.S. intelligence and why he opposed creating a separate bureaucracy in the Department of Homeland Security. He preferred instead a coordinated intelligence, defense and law-enforcement standing joint operation.He is author of 11 books on military strategy, including most recently, "Inside the Five-Sided Box: Lessons from a Lifetime of Leadership in the Pentagon."His favorite books can be seen here; a transcript of our conversation is here.You can stream/download the full conversation, including the podcast extras on Apple iTunes, Overcast, Spotify, Google, Bloomberg and Stitcher. All of our earlier podcasts on your favorite pod hosts can be found here.Next week, we speak with Ilana Weinstein, founder and chief executive officer of IDW Group, a leading consulting and hiring boutique for hedge funds, private equity and family offices.To contact the author of this story: Barry Ritholtz at britholtz3@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: James Greiff at jgreiff@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Barry Ritholtz is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist. He is chairman and chief investment officer of Ritholtz Wealth Management, and was previously chief market strategist at Maxim Group. He is the author of “Bailout Nation.”For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Barrons.com

    JPMorgan CEO Jamie Dimon Discusses Consumer-Banking Costs

    Dimon spoke with Barron’s Jack Hough about a recent Streetwise column about big tech and banking, and objected to a 2018 study that found consumer banking costs haven’t fallen.

  • Bloomberg

    Justice Department No. 2 Cites ‘Serious’ Tech Competition Issues

    (Bloomberg) -- The U.S. Justice Department No. 2 official explained the reasoning behind an investigation of large technology platforms, underscoring the department’s commitment to the probe at the highest levels.Deputy Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen said in a speech Monday at an American Bar Association antitrust forum in Washington that there are “serious and substantive issues” regarding competition by the largest online platforms. While he noted that top department officials are keeping close tabs on the inquiry, no conclusions have been reached yet about the sector, he said.“Even dynamic industries characterized by rapid technological progress can be monopolized to the detriment of consumers,” Rosen said.The Justice Department is investigating whether Alphabet Inc.’s Google and Facebook Inc. thwart competition laws as part of its broader inquiry into digital marketplaces. Attorney General Bill Barr, who has antitrust experience, authorized the probe and is closely watching it.Federal Trade Commission Chairman Joe Simons, who spoke after Rosen, said his agency is also conducting “multiple” probes of technology companies. Facebook has disclosed it’s also being investigated by the FTC.Rosen compared the technology giants to the film industry, which was the subject of multiple antitrust actions in the 20th century. He also referenced the U.S. case against Microsoft Corp. that began in the late 90s and ended in settlement.He cited an appeals court ruling that the software giant’s “operating system was a monopoly” because it was so broadly used that consumers and developers alike were reluctant to switch to competitors.Some antitrust scholars have said that Google, Facebook and other contemporary tech giants are dominant because they benefit from so-called network effects in which platforms become more valuable the more they are used. The companies say they face robust competition.Rosen also acknowledged there are other concerns about the companies that go beyond antitrust that may need to be addressed.“We do not view antitrust law as a panacea for every problem in the digital world,” Rosen said. “We are keeping in mind other tools in areas such as privacy, consumer protection, and public safety as part of a broader review of online platforms, to whatever extent warranted.”To contact the reporters on this story: Ben Brody in Washington, D.C. at btenerellabr@bloomberg.net;David McLaughlin in Washington at dmclaughlin9@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Sara Forden at sforden@bloomberg.net, Mark NiquetteFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Bloomberg

    Disney+ Could Bring Streaming Peace to the Wild West

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- For much of the past decade, the digital media landscape has largely been defined by disruptive companies such as Facebook, YouTube and Netflix. In the case of Facebook and YouTube, those disruptors are now seen as problematic; both face accusations that their platforms have become venues for privacy invasion, misinformation, malicious foreign actors and domestic political extremism. As the federal government weighs regulating these companies this creates an opening for platforms that are well-policed with the potential to take market share from the incumbent bad actors. That suggests the introduction of Walt Disney Co.'s new Disney+ video-streaming service couldn’t have been better timed.Disruptive platforms grew to enormous size by doing pretty much whatever they could to attract both producers and consumers of content. Restrictions on what kinds of content could be published were barriers to growth while also raising thorny ethical questions about how platforms that claimed to be neutral could moderate content on their networks. Content moderation has a big drawback: It's expensive, whether that means building technology to monitor abuse or hiring humans to do the job. It's not too surprising that companies interested in holding down costs and maximizing profits might try to avoid those costs.And it's hard to untangle and design remedies for these problems because the platforms have gone global, with hundreds of millions if not billions of users. With competing and divergent interests among consumers, content producers, advertisers, politicians and shareholders, any change from the status quo is bound to run into opposition. The result is that change ends up being much slower than many might hope.That's where Disney+ comes in. Disney’s announcement on launch day that it had signed up 10 million subscribers indicates potential demand; it's possible that the platform could gain significant market share in the streaming wars much sooner than many anticipate. It gives young parents -- or anyone else not interested in the fire hose of trash on offer elsewhere -- a trusted platform to install on their kids' or their own smartphones and tablets. Every minute spent on Disney+ is a minute not spent on other digital media platforms, lessening the influence of the latter. As the clout of Disney+ grows at the expense of the competition, it could put pressure on the latter to clean up their collective acts and put in place more safeguards.The parallel to consider here is the evolution of the music industry. Until the launch of peer-to-peer music-file-sharing company Napster in 1999, the vast majority of consumers got their music through traditional channels -- mainly radio and CDs. Then Napster and other illicit services built off the BitTorrent platform made it easier for consumers to download MP3 files at a time when major corporations were reluctant to embrace the new technologies. But downloading MP3s often exposed consumers to other types of illegally-distributed content like video games and software. That made MP3s a sort of gateway drug to other dubious online activity and content.That era didn't last long. First, Apple introduced the iTunes store in 2003, which surged in popularity with the growth of first the iPod and later the iPhone. Then, music streaming services like Spotify followed, attracting tens of millions of users. Napster has since shut down, and though black market file-sharing services still exist, most consumers would find them too much of a nuisance to deal with when it's cheap and easy to buy or stream music legitimately.If we're lucky, Disney+ could mark the point when major tech corporations decide to take control of the media ecospheres they've created. There are now a plethora of streaming services with billions of dollars invested in them, giving consumers, particularly parents, choices without some of the downsides of the large, disruptive platforms. Content creators, major corporate partners and advertisers can focus their resources on platforms that have better reputations and aren't constantly in the news for moderation and data-privacy issues. Thriving in the future may require these disruptors to abandon the Wild West ways that powered their initial rise. And who would be bothered by that?To contact the author of this story: Conor Sen at csen9@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: James Greiff at jgreiff@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Conor Sen is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist. He is a portfolio manager for New River Investments in Atlanta and has been a contributor to the Atlantic and Business Insider.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Benzinga

    How Google's Fitbit Acquisition Is Already Posing Some Problems

    Alphabet's Google unit said in November it will buy Fitbit in a $2.1 billion deal to gain better exposure to the health and wellness space. Concerns related to how Google handles health data is not unfounded and gained some credibility based on recent revelations.

  • Google Stadia launches tomorrow
    Yahoo Finance Video

    Google Stadia launches tomorrow

    Google’s cloud gaming service Stadia will launch tomorrow. It will double the number of games that will be available on launch day. Yahoo Finance’s Dan Roberts, Brian Cheung, Julia La Roche and Dan Howley discuss on YFi-AM.

  • Google increasingly interferes with search results, Wall Street Journal reports
    CBS News Videos

    Google increasingly interferes with search results, Wall Street Journal reports

    A new investigation from the Wall Street Journal found that Google is interfering with its algorithms to alter users' search results. Kirsten Grind, one of the authors of the report, joined CBSN to break down the findings.

  • Waymo's Program to Hail Driverless Cars Keeps Expanding
    Bloomberg

    Waymo's Program to Hail Driverless Cars Keeps Expanding

    Nov.18 -- Dan Chu, Waymo Chief Product Officer, talks about the demand for driverless taxis and trucks. He appears on "Bloomberg Technology."

  • Senators Look to Shore Up Data Security
    Bloomberg

    Senators Look to Shore Up Data Security

    Nov.18 -- Senator Josh Hawley, a Republican from Missouri, proposed a bill to limit data that gets transferred to China and Russia. Ben Brody Kurt Wagner report on "Bloomberg Technology."

  • Behind Lazard's Unique Relationship With Google
    Bloomberg

    Behind Lazard's Unique Relationship With Google

    Nov.18 -- Over the last decade, Lazard Ltd. has quietly become Google’s go-to adviser, bringing it the cachet -- though not big fees -- of working with one of the world’s largest companies. Bloomberg's Liana Baker has more on "Bloomberg Markets: The Close."