GOOG Jun 2020 1335.000 call

OPR - OPR Delayed Price. Currency in USD
92.49
0.00 (0.00%)
As of 2:48PM EST. Market open.
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous Close92.49
Open92.49
Bid92.90
Ask95.10
Strike1,335.00
Expire Date2020-06-19
Day's Range92.49 - 92.49
Contract RangeN/A
Volume3
Open Interest31
  • Waymo robotaxi app arrives on the App Store
    TechCrunch

    Waymo robotaxi app arrives on the App Store

    Hailing one of Waymo's self-driving minivans is about to get a little easier. One year after launching its Waymo One self-driving car service in the Phoenix area, the company is launching an app on iOS, the latest signal that the company is inching toward large-scale commercial service. Now, Phoenix residents can download the Waymo app to their iPhone and sign up to ride in one of the company's self-driving vehicles directly from their device.

  • Slack CEO: Microsoft views 'us as an existential threat'
    Yahoo Finance

    Slack CEO: Microsoft views 'us as an existential threat'

    Yahoo Finance speaks with Slack co-founder and CEO Stewart Butterfield following its latest quarterly earnings.

  • Reuters

    UPDATE 1-Labor group accuses Google of sacking workers to deter unionism

    The Communications Workers of America union filed a federal labor charge against Alphabet Inc's Google on Thursday, accusing the company of unlawfully firing four employees to deter workers from engaging in union activities. The complaint, seen by Reuters, will trigger a National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) investigation into whether Google violated the four individuals' right to raise concerns about working conditions. When violations are found in such cases, the NLRB typically tries to help accusers and companies reach a settlement.

  • Investopedia

    Seasonal Hiring Companies Fail to Impress

    Market MovesStocks closed slightly higher in a trading session that featured slightly more selling than buying. The S&P 500 (SPX) and Nasdaq 100 (NDX) closed with a two-tenths percent increase, while the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJX) and the Russell 2000 (RUT) managed half that amount.

  • Labour group accuses Google of sacking workers to deter unionism
    Reuters

    Labour group accuses Google of sacking workers to deter unionism

    The Communications Workers of America union filed a federal labour charge against Alphabet Inc's Google on Thursday, accusing the company of unlawfully firing four employees to deter workers from engaging in union activities. The complaint, seen by Reuters, will trigger a National Labour Relations Board (NLRB) investigation into whether Google violated the four individuals' right to raise concerns about working conditions. When violations are found in such cases, the NLRB typically tries to help accusers and companies reach a settlement.

  • Labor group accuses Google of sacking workers to deter unionism
    Reuters

    Labor group accuses Google of sacking workers to deter unionism

    The Communications Workers of America union filed a federal labor charge against Alphabet Inc's Google on Thursday, accusing the company of unlawfully firing four employees to deter workers from engaging in union activities. The complaint, seen by Reuters, will trigger a National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) investigation into whether Google violated the four individuals' right to raise concerns about working conditions. When violations are found in such cases, the NLRB typically tries to help accusers and companies reach a settlement.

  • American City Business Journals

    Exclusive: Google deal to take North San Jose office park falls through

    Talks between Google and brokers marketing The Assembly development for lease were progressing last month, but a potential deal fell apart within the last two weeks, according to real estate industry sources.

  • Peloton Backlash Has Potential to Boost User Growth in Long Term
    Bloomberg

    Peloton Backlash Has Potential to Boost User Growth in Long Term

    (Bloomberg) -- Peloton Interactive Inc. has been pilloried online and punished on the stock market following the release of a holiday ad for its stationary exercise bike that was deemed culturally insensitive. But the backlash could be a good thing for the company in the long run.The commercial, which features a woman documenting a year in her life with the Peloton bike her male partner gave her, struck some viewers as out of touch -- suggesting the already thin “Grace from Boston” was undergoing a strenuous workout in order to lose weight for the guy. The video, released about a month ago, went viral on social media, eliciting a scathing parody by comedian Eva Victor and prompting Peloton to close comments on the official YouTube video.As the internet buzz seemed to hit a peak earlier this week, Peloton’s stock fell 9%. But some experts say the increased attention could end up boosting sales.“They might benefit more because people are looking it up and learning more about it,” Laura Ries, president of advertising consultancy firm Ries & Ries, said. It’s still a short-term bump for a company that has historically been largely successful with marketing, with a total member base of 1.6 million people including more than 560,000 who have one of the proprietary bikes or treadmills plus a fitness subscription, according to Peloton’s most recent quarterly report. The official Peloton ad on the company’s YouTube channel has been seen by more than 3.6 million people.The controversy comes at a crucial time for the New York-based company, which is new to market scrutiny after listing shares in September, as it seeks to capitalize on the all-important holiday sales season and expand in new markets like the U.K. and Germany. The shares had gained 27% since its initial public offering before the wave of internet commentary dragged it down on Tuesday. The shares closed 5% lower on Thursday.The company is also facing increased competition in the booming at-home fitness market, especially among workout apps. Nike Inc., Aaptiv Inc. and apps like Kayla Itsines’s Sweat with Kayla have all gained followings for exercise programs available on a user’s phone.Peloton has been punished by Wall Street for its focus on growth over profitability. The company sells a stationary bike starting at about $2,000 and a treadmill that costs about $4,000, in addition to a basic “connected fitness” subscription plan at $39 a month for those pieces of hardware, and the separate digital apps that don’t require equipment. Its loss narrowed in the three months ended Sept. 30 to $49.8 million.The stock surged almost 10% last Friday after the company was reportedly seeing strong demand on Black Friday. And earlier this month, Peloton lowered the price of its digital subscription app to $12.49 a month from $19.99 in conjunction with the launch of new apps for Amazon’s Fire TV and the Apple Watch, a move that could entice new users. JMP Securities analysts raised their price target on the stock to $38 after the subscription reduction, saying it “broadens Peloton’s reach, improves conversion, and reduces purchase friction.” Ronald Josey, a JMP analyst, said there are “a lot of good things going on” at the company and that people will continue to buy the bike and other products despite the controversy.According to the most recent earnings report, Peloton expects its user base to grow to 680,000 or more by the end of its second quarter thanks to holiday sales and New Year’s resolutions.Scott Galloway, a professor of marketing a the NYU Stern School of Business, said the commercial itself is tone deaf and borderline offensive. But “in this attention-driven economy, anything that gets attention is arguably a positive,” he said in an interview. “It’s bringing Peloton into the social discourse on very regular basis, which is what ads are supposed to do.” If Peloton had to do it again, Galloway said, “I’d argue they probably would.”To contact the reporter on this story: Julie Verhage in New York at jverhage2@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Mark Milian at mmilian@bloomberg.net, Molly Schuetz, Anne VanderMeyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Barrons.com

    Buy Alphabet and Facebook Stocks Because Revenue Will Rise, 2 Analysts Say

    If you have been holding off buying the tech stocks, analysts at Stifel now say it is time to buy both.

  • Bloomberg

    Waymo’s Autonomous Taxi Service Tops 100,000 Rides

    (Bloomberg) -- More than 100,000 trips have been taken in robotaxis operated by Waymo, the self-driving car unit of Alphabet Inc. Now the service is expanding to iPhone users.On the first anniversary of its pilot program in Chandler, Arizona, Waymo said it will begin offering an iOS app for its robot ride-hailing service for iPhones. It also revealed new details of the pioneering robotaxi service, which has been slow to offer fully autonomous service without human “safety drivers” behind the wheel to take over in an emergency.Waymo, which began a decade ago as Google’s self-driving car project, said its service has 1,500 monthly users and has tripled the number of weekly rides since January. Since late summer, Waymo has ramped up a “rider only” option without human safety drivers to a test group of a few hundred commuters. While those people weren’t always charged initially, they are now paying rates that are competitive with Uber and Lyft ride-hailing services, according to a Waymo spokeswoman.Most Waymo rides occur in the late afternoon and evening, with commuters using the service for everything from getting to work to having a “date night,” Dan Chu, the company’s chief product officer, wrote in a blog post.The service is expanding and will add more riders who will join a wait list by using the new iOS app. The service has been available on Android phones since the spring.Still, John Krafcik, Waymo’s chief executive officer, told reporters in October he is unsure when commercial robotaxis will take off. General Motors Co. has delayed the rollout of its service and Ford Motor Co.’s CEO has said the industry overestimated the arrival of self-driving cars.“It’s an extremely challenging thing to do,” Krafcik told reporters at a dinner in Detroit. “I do share your sense of uncertainty, even in my role. I don’t know precisely when everything is going to be ready, but I know I am supremely confident that it will be.”(Updates with comment from company spokeswoman in third paragraph.)To contact the reporter on this story: Keith Naughton in Southfield, Michigan at knaughton3@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Craig Trudell at ctrudell1@bloomberg.net, Alistair BarrFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Stocks To Watch: See 16 Of The Top Large-Cap Stocks With 25%-98% Growth
    Investor's Business Daily

    Stocks To Watch: See 16 Of The Top Large-Cap Stocks With 25%-98% Growth

    See who joins Facebook, Paycom, Vertex, ServiceNow, and Burlington Stores on this list of the fastest-growing large-cap stocks.

  • Bloomberg

    DeepMind Co-Founder Leaves to Join Owner Google in New Role

    (Bloomberg) -- The co-founder of DeepMind, the high-profile artificial intelligence lab, is set to move to the U.S. to take up a role at parent company Google.Mustafa Suleyman, who ran DeepMind’s “applied” division, was placed on leave in August after controversy over some of the projects he led. In a blog post Thursday, DeepMind said Suleyman is leaving for an unspecified role at Google.The post, written by fellow co-founder and Chief Executive Officer Demis Hassabis, added that the company wanted to ensure it was the “best place in the world for fundamental breakthroughs in AI, and that we conduct this work thoughtfully and responsibly.”Suleyman was a key public face for DeepMind, speaking to officials and at events about the promise of artificial intelligence and the ethical guardrails needed to limit malicious use of the technology.DeepMind was heavily criticized for its work in the U.K. health sector. DeepMind Health’s first product was a mobile app called Streams that was originally designed to help doctors identify patients at risk of developing acute kidney injury. In July 2017, the U.K.’s data privacy watchdog said DeepMind’s partner in the project, London’s Royal Free Hospital, illegally gave DeepMind access to 1.6 million patient records. Suleyman apologized in a statement at the time.In a tweet in August, Suleyman said he was looking forward to returning to DeepMind.Founded in 2010, DeepMind was bought by Google for 400 million pounds (currently $486 million) in 2014, an ambitious bet on the potential of AI that set off an expensive race in Silicon Valley for specialists in the field.“Over the past year, we’ve also been formalizing a leadership team with the seasoned experience and skills for our second decade,” Hassabis said in the post.To contact the reporter on this story: Giles Turner in London at gturner35@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Tom Giles at tgiles5@bloomberg.net, Molly SchuetzFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • TheStreet.com

    Google, Facebook Lifted to Buy at Stifel on Valuations, Sustained Revenue Momentum

    Stifel sees Google becoming even more dominant in digital ads, and Facebook sustaining momentum while managing profit margins.

  • Is Google Stock A Buy? Consider Antitrust Risk, Buyback, New Ad Products
    Investor's Business Daily

    Is Google Stock A Buy? Consider Antitrust Risk, Buyback, New Ad Products

    Here is what fundamental and technical analysis says about buying Google stock. There's also antitrust risk, financial transparency, new ad products and stock buyback to consider.

  • Benzinga

    Resilience Back In Picture: Solid Rebound From Early Week Slide Amid Trade Hopes

    Specifically, The Wall Street Journal reported early Thursday that Beijing says China’s trade negotiations with the U.S. “remain on track,” and both sides maintain close communication. One example might be Tiffany & Co (NYSE: TIF), whose earnings per share missed analysts’ estimates significantly. In other corporate news, United Airlines Holdings Inc (NASDAQ: UAL) CEO Oscar Munoz will leave his job as CEO next May, CNBC reported.

  • MarketWatch

    Alphabet stock gains after Stifel turns bullish

    Shares of Alphabet Inc. are up 0.6% in premarket trading Thursday after Stifel's Scott Devitt upgraded the stock to buy from hold. Devitt cited the company's "durable earnings growth" and ad-dollar share gains as reasons for his optimism. "More recently, some Google search ecosystem participants have reported [search-engine optimization] headwinds, which may signal incremental monetization of search traffic on Google," he wrote. As for Alphabet's recently announced CEO shift, which has Google Chief Executive Sundar Pichai stepping into the top role at Alphabet as well, Devitt said it's too soon to know what changes Pichai will bring to Alphabet's other-bets business area consisting of self-driving cars and other futuristic initiatives, but he assumes Pichai "will keep the long-term portfolio objectives focused with investors in mind." Alphabet shares have increased 26% so far this year, as the S&P 500 has risen 24%.

  • 5 things to know about Sundar Pichai, CEO of Google and Alphabet
    American City Business Journals

    5 things to know about Sundar Pichai, CEO of Google and Alphabet

    He's not as well-known as Google co-founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin, but we've learned a few things about Sundar Pichai since he became CEO of Google in 2015.

  • Warren Is Drafting U.S. Legislation to Reverse ‘Mega Mergers’
    Bloomberg

    Warren Is Drafting U.S. Legislation to Reverse ‘Mega Mergers’

    (Bloomberg) -- U.S. Senator Elizabeth Warren is drafting a bill that would call on regulators to retroactively review about two decades of “mega mergers” and ban such deals going forward.Warren’s staff recently circulated a proposal for sweeping anti-monopoly legislation, which would deliver on a presidential campaign promise to check the power of Big Tech and other industries. Although the Trump administration is currently exploring their own antitrust probes, the proposal is likely to face resistance from lawmakers.According to a draft of the bill reviewed by Bloomberg, the proposal would expand antitrust law beyond the so-called consumer welfare standard, an approach that has driven antitrust policy since the 1970s. Under the current framework, the federal government evaluates mergers primarily based on potential harm to consumers through higher prices or decreased quality. The new bill would direct the government to also consider the impact on entrepreneurs, innovation, privacy and workers.Warren’s bill, tentatively titled the Anti-Monopoly and Competition Restoration Act, would also ban non-compete and no-poaching agreements for workers and protect the rights of gig economy workers, such as drivers for Uber Technologies Inc., to organize.A draft of Warren’s bill was included in an email Monday from Spencer Waller, the director of the Institute for Consumer Antitrust Studies at Loyola University Chicago. Waller urged fellow academics to sign a petition supporting it. He said Warren was working on the bill with Representative David Cicilline, the most prominent voice on antitrust issues in the House. Waller declined to comment on the email.Representatives for Cicilline and Warren declined to comment. The existence of the bill and Warren’s support of it were reported earlier this week by the technology publication the Information.In Washington, there is some support across the political spectrum for increased antitrust scrutiny of large technology companies. Warren positioned herself as a leader on the issue this year while campaigning on a plan to break up Big Tech. She has repeatedly called for unwinding Facebook Inc.’s acquisitions of WhatsApp and Instagram, along with Google’s purchase of YouTube and advertising platform DoubleClick.Read more: Warren Accuses Michael Bloomberg of ‘Buying the Election’It’s not clear when a bill would be introduced or whether it would move forward in its current form. Cicilline has said he would not introduce antitrust legislation until he concludes an antitrust investigation for the House Judiciary Committee in early 2020.Amy Klobuchar, a Senator from Minnesota who’s also vying for the Democratic nomination, has pushed legislation covering similar ground. Klobuchar plans to introduce additional antitrust legislation soon, according to a person familiar with the matter who wasn’t authorized to discuss the plans and asked not to be identified.Any proposal would face significant hurdles to becoming law, and Warren’s version could be particularly problematic because it promotes the idea that antitrust enforcement is equivalent to being against big business, said Barak Orbach, a law professor at the University of Arizona who received a draft of the bill. “The way I read it is that Elizabeth Warren is trying to make a political statement in the course of her campaign,” Orbach said. “It’s likely to have negative effects on antitrust enforcement, so I just don’t see the upside other than for the campaign.”The bill proposes a ban on mergers where one company has annual revenue of more $40 billion, or where both companies have sales exceeding $15 billion, except under certain exceptions, such as when a company is in immediate danger of insolvency. That would seemingly put a freeze on many acquisitions for Apple Inc., Alphabet Inc., Facebook, Microsoft Corp. and dozens of other companies. The bill would also place new limitations on smaller mergers.Chris Sagers, a law professor at Cleveland State University, said the proposal would serve as an effective check on corporate power. “I don’t think you’ll have new antitrust policy until Congress says the courts have incorrectly interpreted the statutes,” he said. “Someone has to do what Elizabeth Warren is doing.”(Michael Bloomberg is also seeking the Democratic presidential nomination. Bloomberg is the founder and majority owner of Bloomberg LP, the parent company of Bloomberg News.)To contact the reporters on this story: Eric Newcomer in San Francisco at enewcomer@bloomberg.net;Joshua Brustein in New York at jbrustein@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Mark Milian at mmilian@bloomberg.netFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Google Facing New Front With U.K. Probe Into $2.6 Billion Deal
    Bloomberg

    Google Facing New Front With U.K. Probe Into $2.6 Billion Deal

    (Bloomberg) -- Google is facing a U.K. investigation into its $2.6 billion takeover of data company Looker Data Sciences Inc., opening up another front in the Alphabet Inc. unit’s ongoing battle with lawmakers.The Competition and Markets Authority on Thursday said that it issued an initial enforcement order, which prevents companies from integrating their services while the regulator carries out a early-stage review of the acquisition. The CMA has asked for comments on the deal by Dec. 20 before it decides whether to begin a formal probe.Google announced in June that it planned to buy U.S.-based Looker for its cloud unit, which lags far behind Amazon.com Inc. and Microsoft Corp. with just 4% of the cloud-computing infrastructure market as of 2018, according to the most-recent figures from analyst Gartner Inc. U.S. regulators cleared the deal in November.The U.K. review -- likely to focus on how Google plans to wield its power over data -- comes as Margrethe Vestager, the European Union’s Competition Commissioner, leads the charge into looking into how companies collect and use information. In August, she called tech giants “robot vacuum cleaners” sucking up valuable data in a way that can undermine competition.Vestager is currently investigating “the data business model” used by Google and others to collect information on how people use the web. She said the EU has posed “many questions to Google and others to get their views” and help the EU understand how the industry works, with a focus on contractual terms.Google agreed to buy smartwatch maker Fitbit Inc. for $2.1 billion. The tie-up, announced in October, has come under scrutiny from U.S. lawmakers.Though Google isn’t a leader in smartwatches or fitness trackers, regulators in the U.S. and elsewhere will likely have questions about what Google intends to do with the data Fitbit users have shared over the years, including intimate health and location information.\--With assistance from Jonathan Browning.To contact the reporter on this story: Giles Turner in London at gturner35@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Giles Turner at gturner35@bloomberg.net, Peter Chapman, Nate LanxonFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Growth stocks still have room to run before reaching previous bubble valuations, Credit Suisse strategist says
    MarketWatch

    Growth stocks still have room to run before reaching previous bubble valuations, Credit Suisse strategist says

    A Credit Suisse strategist reiterated an overweight call on U.S. growth stocks, which he says can outperform even when bond yields rise.

  • Financial Times

    DeepMind co-founder leaves for policy role at Google

    The co-founder of DeepMind, the UK’s leading artificial intelligence company, is leaving to take up a role at sister company Google in the US. Mustafa Suleyman, 35, founded DeepMind with Demis Hassabis and Shane Legg in 2010 but has been on leave from the company for the past six months, saying he needed a “break to recharge”. On Thursday, he said he would work on the “opportunities and impacts of applied AI technologies” with Kent Walker, Google’s senior vice-president for global affairs, and Jeff Dean, head of Google AI.