GOOG Jan 2022 1255.000 call

OPR - OPR Delayed Price. Currency in USD
200.83
0.00 (0.00%)
As of 6:46PM EDT. Market open.
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous Close200.83
Open200.83
Bid285.00
Ask295.00
Strike1,255.00
Expire Date2022-01-21
Day's Range200.83 - 200.83
Contract RangeN/A
Volume3
Open Interest17
  • Apple and Google block dozens of Chinese apps in India
    TechCrunch

    Apple and Google block dozens of Chinese apps in India

    Two days after India blocked 59 apps developed by Chinese firms, Google and Apple have started to comply with New Delhi's order and are preventing users in the world's second largest internet market from accessing those apps. UC Browser, Shareit, and Club Factory and other apps that India has blocked are no longer listed on Apple's App Store and Google Play Store.

  • Google confirms US offices will remain closed until at least September, as COVID-19 spikes
    TechCrunch

    Google confirms US offices will remain closed until at least September, as COVID-19 spikes

    A few months back, Google announced plans to reopen some U.S. offices after the July 4th holiday. Things have obviously not been going great in terms of the United States’ battle with COVID-19, and Google once again finds itself proceeding on the side of caution. As was first reported by Bloomberg, Google has since confirmed with TechCrunch that it will be pushing back reopening at least until September 7, after the Labor Day holiday in the States.

  • Google, Facebook Would Face FTC Over Policies in Democratic Bill
    Bloomberg

    Google, Facebook Would Face FTC Over Policies in Democratic Bill

    (Bloomberg) -- A top Democratic lawmaker wants to empower the U.S. Federal Trade Commission to take action against Alphabet Inc.’s Google and Facebook Inc., among other technology platforms, if they fail to remove content that violates their terms of service and community standards.Democratic Representative Jan Schakowsky of Illinois, who chairs a subcommittee on consumer protection, told Bloomberg in an interview that she plans to introduce a bill in the coming days that would clarify that if technology companies fail to fulfill the “assurances” made to users in terms and conditions, community standards, advertising rules and content moderation policies, they could face enforcement from the FTC.The initiative falls into a flurry of measures that aim to limit a much-cherished liability shield for user content under Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act. Many of the initiatives are coming from Republicans, including President Donald Trump, as a way to address their claims that social media sites silence conservative voices.“Irrespective of what Trump is saying, we’re going to move ahead in a bipartisan way to do what we need to do to protect consumers,” Schakowsky said.The FTC already polices businesses under its authority to enforce against “unfair or deceptive acts or practices.” Schakowsky’s bill would clarify that Section 230 can’t be used as a defense in those cases.The idea behind the bill would be to treat Facebook’s failure to block a post advocating, say, white supremacy or Google’s inability to stop an ad for medical masks, both of which are banned, the same way the FTC treats broken promises by companies to deliver cures or cybersecurity protection. The agency can seek injunctions, consent decrees and fines for repeat offenders.Facebook and Google have extensive bans on certain kinds of content, including Covid-19 scams, medical misinformation, posts inciting violence, terrorist content, harassment, hate speech, illegal drug sales and violent and graphic content.Facebook and Instagram have also taken action to ban white-nationalist content on their social-media platforms as well, while Google bans counterfeit goods and dangerous products and says that it protects advertisers “from invalid activity and advertising fraud.”A Google representative declined to comment. Facebook representatives could not be reached for comment after business hours on Wednesday.Schakowsky’s concern, which some of her GOP colleagues share, is that technology companies will try to duck any FTC enforcement of their content-moderation policies by invoking Section 230. The provision exempts them from liability for third-party posts, but has been interpreted by courts to free companies from much scrutiny over what content they leave up or take down.“Bottom line, we want to clarify that there is no doubt that 230 is not going to be the escape hatch,” Schakowsky said.By example, Schakowsky pointed to an effort by Airbnb Inc. to escape local regulation of short-term rental listing by invoking the provision, though a federal court rebuffed the effort.An FTC spokesperson didn’t comment on the bill, but said the agency “is committed to robust enforcement of consumer protection and competition laws, including with respect to social media platforms, and consistent with our jurisdictional authority and constitutional limitations.”While the companies have stepped up enforcement in recent years, Schakowsky said that the bill is necessary because of the spread of election misinformation targeting Black voters, scams involving stimulus checks and other content that proliferates despite being banned.Schakowsky’s effort follows a bill from five Republican senators led by tech critic Josh Hawley of Missouri that would expose the platforms to customer lawsuits if they engage in “intentionally selective enforcement” of their terms and standards.And a sweeping proposal by Trump’s Justice Department would clarify that Section 230 doesn’t stop federal civil enforcement. Trump’s May executive order also aimed to expose companies to FTC enforcement, as well as to user lawsuits if the platforms “use their power over a vital means of communication to engage in deceptive or pretextual actions stifling free and open debate by censoring certain viewpoints.”Schakowsky agreed with criticism of the White House order, which came after Twitter Inc. slapped a fact-check on one of Trump’s tweets, as an assault on the platform’s constitutional right. Her bill would focus more narrowly on FTC enforcement, rather than exposing companies to potentially thousands of user lawsuits.Promises, PromisesWhile many tech critics have urged companies to more strongly enforce their terms of service, ad policies, community standards and other documents, some have suggested that the companies might scale those back to avoid making promises they can’t deliver and that could draw FTC scrutiny.Others suggest that the company statements don’t represent promises at all and are merely rules that users must follow.“Proving deception from community standards language is probably pretty difficult because it’s couched in best efforts rather than a promise,” said Neil Chilson, a former FTC official who defends Section 230.Schakowsky said that FTC officials have told her they welcome her attempt to clarify the agency’s authority in an area that remains little-tested. “We need to empower them,” she said.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Dow Jones Futures: Coronavirus Stock Market Rally Powers Ahead On FANG Stocks Facebook, Netflix; Tesla Deliveries In Focus
    Investor's Business Daily

    Dow Jones Futures: Coronavirus Stock Market Rally Powers Ahead On FANG Stocks Facebook, Netflix; Tesla Deliveries In Focus

    Facebook, Netflix and other FANG stocks led Wednesday's market rally, with the Nasdaq hitting a record high. Tesla kept rising ahead of Q2 delivery figures.

  • Behind the Lens: How Google’s Street View Traveler Is Capturing the World’s Most Iconic Places
    Skift

    Behind the Lens: How Google’s Street View Traveler Is Capturing the World’s Most Iconic Places

    Sometimes a drive-by isn't enough. Google Maps has used cameras on trucks since 2007 to capture the world for its Street View. But when it comes to the world's best-known landmarks, the search giant has been taking extra steps to create virtual representations. Google sends workers to record the surroundings on foot when a vehicle […]

  • Facebook, Amazon, Apple, Google CEOs Agree To Jointly Testify Before Congress In Antitrust Case
    Benzinga

    Facebook, Amazon, Apple, Google CEOs Agree To Jointly Testify Before Congress In Antitrust Case

    The chief executive officers of Facebook Inc. (NASDAQ: FB), Amazon.com Inc. (NASDAQ: AMZN), Apple Inc. (NASDAQ: AAPL), and Google parent company Alphabet Inc. (NASDAQ: GOOG) (NASDAQ: GOOGL) have all agreed to testify before the Congress in an ongoing antitrust investigation, CNBC reported Wednesday.What Happened Apple CEO Tim Cook was the last to come on board, as other companies provisionally agreed to the appearance of their CEOs if the other companies do the same, CNBC noted. Amazon, in a letter to the House Judiciary Committee last month, said CEO Jeff Bezos would be available to testify.Alphabet CEO Sundar Pichai, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, and Cook have all individually made congressional testimonies before, but this will be the first time for Bezos to testify before the Congress.According to CNBC, the hearing is likely to take place in July and could happen virtually due to the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.Why It Matters The House Judiciary Committee last year launched a bipartisan inquiry into alleged anticompetitive practices at the largest technology firms and requested the companies to turn over all relevant documents related to acquisitions and mergers.Price Action Facebook shares closed 4.6% higher at $237.55 on Wednesday and were down nearly 0.2% in the after-hours session.Apple stock closed 0.19% lower at $364.11 per share, and Alphabet Class A shares closed 1.7% lower, both were unchanged in the after-hours.Amazon stock closed 4.35% lower at $2,878.70 per share.See more from Benzinga * Apple-Focused Enterprise Software Developer Jamf Files To Go Public * Lyft Resumes Self-Driving Test Rides * Apple Pushing Suppliers To Ensure 5G iPhone Range Isn't Delayed: Report(C) 2020 Benzinga.com. Benzinga does not provide investment advice. All rights reserved.

  • Google, Gap Inc. Discuss Navigating the ‘Path Forward’
    WWD

    Google, Gap Inc. Discuss Navigating the ‘Path Forward’

    Executives from Google and Gap Inc. joined WWD in analyzing accelerating digital trends and ongoing changes in consumer behavior.

  • U.S., EU advocacy groups warn against Google's purchase of Fitbit
    Reuters

    U.S., EU advocacy groups warn against Google's purchase of Fitbit

    Twenty advocacy groups from the United States, Europe, Latin America and elsewhere signed a statement Wednesday urging regulators to be wary of Google's $2.1 billion bid for fitness tracker company Fitbit Inc <FIT.N> because of privacy and competition concerns. The 20 organizations - which include the U.S.-based Public Citizen, Access Now from Europe and the Brazilian Institute of Consumer Defense - argued that the deal would expand the already considerable clout in digital markets of Alphabet Inc's <GOOGL.O> Google.

  • Financial Times

    EU signals deeper investigation of Google Fitbit deal

    The EU is examining whether Google’s proposed $2.1bn takeover of the fitness-tracking company Fitbit will give the company more data to entrench its search engine and advertising businesses, as consumer groups called for the deal to be blocked. EU regulators have sent two questionnaires, adding up to around 60 pages, asking Google and Fitbit’s rivals whether the deal will damage competition, disadvantage other fitness tracking apps in Google’s Play Store, or give Google more profiling data to improve its online search and advertising businesses. The questionnaires also ask rivals to assess the impact of the deal on Google’s growing digital healthcare business.

  • U.K. regulators take aim at Apple's search engine deal with Google
    Reuters

    U.K. regulators take aim at Apple's search engine deal with Google

    Apple received the "substantial majority" of the 1.2 billion pounds ($1.5 billion) that Google paid to be the default search engine on a variety of devices in the United Kingdom in 2019, according to the report. The U.K. Competition and Markets Authority, in its final report investigating online platforms and digital advertising, said the arrangements between Apple and Google create "a significant barrier to entry and expansion" for Google's rivals in the search engine market.

  • China Upstart CEO Steps Down After Building $44 Billion Fortune
    Bloomberg

    China Upstart CEO Steps Down After Building $44 Billion Fortune

    (Bloomberg) -- Colin Huang stepped down as chief executive officer of Pinduoduo Inc. after building the five-year-old startup into a force in China’s e-commerce industry and, in the process, becoming one of the country’s richest people.He’s turning the role over to Lei Chen, another founder at the Shanghai-based company, effective immediately, PDD said in a letter to employees posted on its website. Huang, 40, will remain chairman.“I hope that through the management changes, we can gradually hand over more managerial duties and responsibilities to our younger colleagues, give space and opportunities for the team to grow, and drive Pinduoduo to become a more mature company with continuous entrepreneurial spirit,” Huang wrote in the letter.While tech founders often eventually cede management duties to lieutenants, Huang is handing over the reins just a few years after PDD’s start. Huang and his co-founders began the group-shopping app in 2015 at a time when Alibaba Group Holding Ltd. seemed to have a lock on the e-commerce business in China.But PDD provided an innovative service with discounted goods and customized offerings, and went public in 2018. The company’s shares have soared more than four-fold since then and its market cap is about $102 billion. Huang’s net worth is $44.3 billion, the third-highest in China, according to the Bloomberg Billionaires Index.Analysts at Jefferies and Citigroup Inc. said the move was unexpected and a surprise. PDD’s shares were little changed in U.S. trading.Huang, previously an engineer at Google, said in the letter that he had transferred around 371 million ordinary shares currently under his name to the Pinduoduo Partnership, and that he wanted some of the stock to be used for research and social responsibility. That transfer is equal to about 7.7% of total shares, he said. In addition, Huang said he had officially set up a charity foundation and that together with the founding team, had donated to it around 114 million Pinduoduo shares, or about 2.4% of total shares.In a separate Q&A circulated to media, Huang said he would step back from day-to-day management to work on the company’s long-term strategy and corporate structure, and devote more time to fundamental research that could drive the future of PDD.A data scientist by training, Chen has served as chief technology officer since 2016. He said he will focus on growing the company’s newer business units, citing its shipping information system as an example. “This division of labor will help us steer the company in its next phase of growth and development,” Chen said.(Adds more detail throughout)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • TheStreet.com

    Apple, Facebook, Amazon and Google CEOs to Testify to Congress: Report

    The CEOs of Apple , Facebook , Amazon.com and Alphabet's Google are expected to testify before a congressional committee probing antitrust issues, according to published reports late Wednesday. Tim Cook of Apple, Sundar Pichai of Google, Mark Zuckerberg of Facebook and Jeff Bezos, of Amazon will likely appear July 27 Reuters reported, citing two sources familiar with the matter.

  • MarketWatch

    CEOs of Alphabet, Amazon, Apple and Facebook to testify before Congress in late July: report

    The chief executives of Google parent Alphabet Inc. , Amazon.com Inc. , Apple Inc. , and Facebook Inc. have agreed to testify before Congress on antitrust issues in late July, Rep. David Cicilline, D-R.I., chairman of the House Judiciary Antitrust Subcommittee, told tech journalist Kara Swisher late Wednesday. The office of Rep. Jerry Nadler, D-N.Y., confirmed the hearing with NBC News. Cicilline's office was not immediately available for comment. Amazon has previously said it would make CEO Jeff Bezos available to testify this summer. Facebook declined comment. Alphabet and Apple were not immediately available for comment. The four companies are the subject of investigations by the Department of Justice and Federal Trade Commission into their business practices and the substantial clout they wield over the tech industry and the economy.

  • U.S. tech chief executives expected to testify before House panel in late July
    Reuters

    U.S. tech chief executives expected to testify before House panel in late July

    The chief executives of the four U.S. tech giants -- Amazon.com, Facebook, Alphabet's Google and Apple -- will testify before the U.S. Congress in late July as part of an ongoing antitrust probe into the companies, according to two sources familiar with the matter. Amazon's Jeff Bezos, Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg, Sundar Pichai of Google and Apple's Tim Cook will appear as part of the probe by the House of Representatives Judiciary Committee's antitrust panel, the sources said.

  • U.S. senator to change anti-child porn bill over Google, Facebook encryption concerns: draft
    Reuters

    U.S. senator to change anti-child porn bill over Google, Facebook encryption concerns: draft

    Tech companies, currently protected from lawsuits over content posted by users, feared the original bill would hurt their ability to offer protections like end-to-end encryption. In a new draft authored by Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey Graham, The Eliminating Abuse and Rampant Neglect of Interactive Technologies Act of 2019, or EARN IT Act, makes compliance with a set of controversial "best practices" voluntary instead of mandatory for companies such as for Facebook Inc and Alphabet Inc's Google.

  • UK regulators take aim at Apple's search engine deal with Google
    Reuters

    UK regulators take aim at Apple's search engine deal with Google

    Apple received the "substantial majority" of the 1.2 billion pounds ($1.5 billion) that Google paid to be the default search engine on a variety of devices in the United Kingdom in 2019, according to the report. The U.K. Competition and Markets Authority, in its final report investigating online platforms and digital advertising, said the arrangements between Apple and Google create "a significant barrier to entry and expansion" for Google's rivals in the search engine market.

  • Virtual MVPDs Are Suffering the Same Fate as Traditional Cable
    Motley Fool

    Virtual MVPDs Are Suffering the Same Fate as Traditional Cable

    Google's YouTube TV is raising its monthly rate from $50 to $65. The company cited those additional channels, its deal with AT&T (NYSE: T) to offer subscribers HBO Max, as well as some new features in its price increase announcement. YouTube TV had been the lowest-priced virtual multichannel video programming distributor (vMVPD) that offered a full-fledged cable subscription replacement.

  • MarketWatch

    Peloton app comes to Roku devices, stock gains

    Peloton Interactive Inc. said Wednesday that its app is now available on Roku devices in the U.S. and Canada and will soon come to the U.K. A Peloton spokesman said in an email to MarketWatch that the Roku announcement means Peloton's app is now "on all of the major streaming TV platforms." That includes Apple Inc.'s Apple TV, Amazon.com. Inc.'s Fire TV, Alphabet Inc.'s Android TV, and "many" set-tip boxes from AT&T Inc. . Peloton has sought to capitalize on the rising interest in home fitness as the COVID-19 outbreak has kept people out of gyms. The company said in conjunction with its last earnings report that it saw "a significant increase in demand" toward the end of the March quarter and at the time the company faced an extended backlog as it sought to meet this new demand. Peloton shares have gained 115% over the past three months as the S&P 500 has risen 26%.

  • How TheSkimm Makes Money: Advertisements and Subscription Services
    Investopedia

    How TheSkimm Makes Money: Advertisements and Subscription Services

    Popular news digest newsletter theSkimm has expanded its offerings to include a subscription service and even a book and tour by the company's founders.

  • Facebook Boycott Adds to an Already Bleak Year for Advertising
    Bloomberg

    Facebook Boycott Adds to an Already Bleak Year for Advertising

    (Bloomberg) -- Long before an uproar over online hate speech prompted hundreds of marketers to cut summer social media budgets, 2020 was turning out to be a dismal year for the global advertising industry.Total ad spending will fall 12% this year, compared with a 6.2% gain in 2019, according to GroupM, a division of advertising giant WPP Plc. That’s the biggest contraction in at least a decade. As the global pandemic spread around the world and consumer spending slowed to a trickle, many corporations targeted marketing as a fast, early way to cut costs.One ad agency executive said third-quarter buying would be down 20% to 30%. New deals were being struck with “force majeure” clauses that would allow advertisers to pull out if a second wave of the virus caused new shutdowns, said the executive, who requested anonymity discussing internal financial figures. In the U.S., hopes that the virus would slow by summer are fading as states that had begun opening up move to shut down again because of a jump in cases.Against this backdrop, advertisers are making another shift. Big companies around the world have said they’ll pause spending on social media, several of them singling out Facebook Inc., because they don’t want marketing messages appearing alongside the vitriol and disinformation. Many are heeding the call from a consortium of civil rights and other advocacy groups, including Color of Change and the Anti-Defamation League, to stop spending on Facebook for July to protest the company’s failure to police harmful content.The pause creates a way for many companies to take a public stance against hate while at the same time providing a concrete reason to trim marketing budgets or, in some cases, experiment with alternatives to traditional social media, such as Amazon.com Inc. or ByteDance’s TikTok. “While many brands were planning on pulling back ad spend anyways, a portion of Facebook-allocated dollars may end up on Snapchat, Pinterest, Amazon, Walmart, etc.,” Mark Shmulik, an analyst at Sanford C. Bernstein, wrote in a recent research note.Ad budgets are an indicator of corporate sentiment toward the world economy. Confidence and growth leads to bigger budgets and higher ad prices. Ad spending cratered in March and April as businesses shut and people stayed home to comply with lockdown orders.In interviews earlier in the year, ad execs were mostly hopeful that the pain would end once quarantines lifted and the economy rebounded. But behind the scenes, the picture was more bleak. Ad agencies, which choose how and when to spend the money companies entrust to them, have cut thousands of jobs. Ad executives who had spent money on spots meant to run during now-canceled sports events tried to recoup the money and find new outlets for it, according to people interviewed by Bloomberg who asked not to be identified discussing private negotiations.Despite the larger advertising pullback, a pause for social media platforms like Facebook, Twitter Inc. and YouTube creates an opening for ad upstarts on the digital side. Packaged foods company Conagra Brands Inc. pulled Facebook advertisements, redirecting the money to search and e-commerce ads, a category most likely to benefit online rivals Google and Amazon.Ben & Jerry’s, a division of Unilever, was one of the early brands to join the StopHateForProfit campaign. “The marketing dollars that would have been spent on Facebook will be spent on other channels, including possibly some Black-owned media outlets,” said Chris Miller, the activism manager at Ben & Jerry’s.Even if the boycotts gain momentum and persist for more than a month, Google and Facebook are still likely to benefit in the long-term from the disruption wrought by the pandemic. That’s because these companies offer advertisers the most flexible and direct way to reach consumers; spending can be paused or ramped up on a moment’s notice. The tech giants also benefit from the millions of small businesses that rely heavily on them for day-to-day business and don’t necessarily need to take a public stand on moral issues. “They may grab an even greater market share post COVID-19 than the strong gains we are currently projecting,” Michael Nathanson, an analyst at MoffettNathanson LLC, said of Facebook and Google.The more traditional parts of the ad ecosystem, which still account for around half of advertising spending, are in a riskier position.For the TV industry, the advertising outlook for the rest of 2020 will depend on two still-unanswered questions. One is how much the pandemic-driven recession will accelerate cable-TV cord-cutting. With unemployment high, more people are expected to cancel their TV subscriptions as they tighten their household budgets. That would hurt viewership and the advertising dollars that go with it. The bigger audiences as a result of people being confined to their homes has already started to fall for just about all programming except news as more people venture outdoors again.The other big question is the return of sports. As long as professional and college football starts up again this fall, media companies like Fox Corp., Comcast Corp., Walt Disney Co. and ViacomCBS will likely see a rebound in advertising revenue, analysts say. Brands spent over $4 billion on TV commercials during NFL games last year.Still, some big TV advertisers could be less willing to jump back this year at all. Carmakers like General Motors and Ford, for instance, have been among the top buyers of TV commercials. The global pandemic has disrupted their supply chains and raised doubts about consumers making big purchases like cars.Media companies and TV networks are now under pressure to make their contracts more flexible. TV networks typically prevent advertisers from pulling all of their money out on short notice. That frustrated many advertisers this spring when the pandemic first kicked off the recession. Now, advertisers are pushing for the right to pull more of their money out of a TV network with fewer days notice in case the coronavirus worsens the economic picture. They will, however, likely pay a higher price for that flexibility, according to one TV executive.That could send them back to the digital platforms, regardless of all the commitments to boycott Facebook.“Brands can stop TV ads but they can’t stop things being on social,” said Arron Shepherd, co-founder of global social media and influencer marketing agency Goat.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • EU throws new rule book at Google, tech giants in competition search
    Reuters

    EU throws new rule book at Google, tech giants in competition search

    Exasperated by its failure to loosen Google's market grip, despite more than $8 billion in fines, the European Union is lining up new rules to level the playing field for rivals. Driven in large part by a conclusion that multiple antitrust actions against Google have been ineffectual, the EU's new strategy aims to lay down ground rules for data-sharing and how digital marketplaces operate. "It is indeed to prevent a situation like the ones we have had with the Google cases so that we still would have competition," the EU's digital chief as well as its top antitrust enforcer Margrethe Vestager told Reuters last month.

  • Seth Klarman Ups Stake in Translate Bio
    GuruFocus.com

    Seth Klarman Ups Stake in Translate Bio

    Guru adds to holding on the back of the slipping price Continue reading...

  • Streaming TV services increase prices
    Yahoo Finance Video

    Streaming TV services increase prices

    Streaming platforms YouTube TV and FuboTV raised its service prices for customers. Yahoo Finance’s Tech Editor Dan Howley weighs in.

  • Constellation Brands buys direct-to-consumer Empathy Wines
    Yahoo Finance Video

    Constellation Brands buys direct-to-consumer Empathy Wines

    Constellation Brands is acquiring Gary Vaynerchuk's direct-to-consumer subscription wine platform, Empathy Wines. Yahoo Finance's Brian Sozzi, Heidi Chung, and Ines Ferre discuss why the partnership is right, consumer trends, and marketing the Empathy Wines brand on social media platforms with Empathy Wines Co-Founder Gary Vaynerchuk and Constellation Brands EVP Robert Hanson.