GPS - The Gap, Inc.

NYSE - NYSE Delayed Price. Currency in USD
16.31
-0.36 (-2.16%)
At close: 4:02PM EDT
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous Close16.67
Open16.52
Bid0.00 x 800
Ask0.00 x 900
Day's Range16.07 - 16.58
52 Week Range15.22 - 32.98
Volume8,529,006
Avg. Volume6,708,315
Market Cap6.165B
Beta (3Y Monthly)0.70
PE Ratio (TTM)5.88
EPS (TTM)2.78
Earnings DateAug 22, 2019
Forward Dividend & Yield0.97 (5.82%)
Ex-Dividend Date2019-10-08
1y Target Est21.05
Trade prices are not sourced from all markets
  • Gap's Banana Republic Brand to Launch Style Passport in US
    Zacks

    Gap's Banana Republic Brand to Launch Style Passport in US

    Gap's (GPS) Banana Republic brand plans to introduce Style Passport for its women's apparel collection in the United States. This is likely to bring incremental sales.

  • Why General Electric, Gap, and JD.com Jumped Today
    Motley Fool

    Why General Electric, Gap, and JD.com Jumped Today

    On a positive day for the major benchmarks, these stocks did better than most.

  • MarketWatch

    Banana Republic launching Style Passport, a clothing rental service for women

    Banana Republic said Friday that it will launch Style Passport, an online rental subscription service for its women's clothing collection at the end of September in the U.S. Men's will be added at a later date. "Style Passport will drive incremental revenue, and help us connect with younger shoppers who appreciate great style and want an affordable, sustainable way to try new fashion," said Mark Breitbard, chief executive of Banana Republic, which is part of the Gap Inc. . Gap's other brands include the namesake and Old Navy, which will be spun off into its own business. Banana Republic had been a same-store sales laggard among the Gap brands, but has shown improvement. "With this new service, we'll gather valuable insights from a highly interactive customer base that can be used to design future product and experiences," Breitbard said. The service is $85 per month for a three-garment plan, which also includes free laundering and unlimited returns. Users have the option to purchase any item. Banana Republic also plans to offer buy-online-pickup-in-store service in the fall. Gap stock has lost half its value over the last year while the S&P 500 index is up 0.2%.

  • Business Wire

    Banana Republic Introduces Style Passport, a New Rental Subscription Service for Women

    Banana Republic announced today the launch of Style Passport, an online subscription service that provides unlimited access to its women’s apparel collection. Rental subscription is an innovative platform that will increase access to Banana Republic’s versatile style and help bring new customers to the brand. Style Passport will drive incremental revenue, and help us connect with younger shoppers who appreciate great style and want an affordable, sustainable way to try new fashion,” said Mark Breitbard, CEO and President of Banana Republic.

  • Analysts Estimate Gap (GPS) to Report a Decline in Earnings: What to Look Out for
    Zacks

    Analysts Estimate Gap (GPS) to Report a Decline in Earnings: What to Look Out for

    Gap (GPS) doesn't possess the right combination of the two key ingredients for a likely earnings beat in its upcoming report. Get prepared with the key expectations.

  • Business Wire

    Gap Inc. Announces Third Quarter Dividend

    Gap Inc. today announced its board of directors authorized a third quarter fiscal year 2019 dividend of $0.2425 per share, payable on or after October 30, 2019 to shareholders of record at the close of business on October 9, 2019.

  • Financial Times

    Trump fundraiser backlash; EU green finance revs up; ESG myths busted

    Welcome to Moral Money! This week we look at the perils of supporting Donald Trump while owning a hip lifestyle brand, a number of innovative green financial deals in Europe and a new exhaustive study from Morgan Stanley that sets out to answer the question once and for all on whether or not sustainable investing hurts performance. The billionaire has subsequently told his friends he never considered this “news”.

  • China Sticking to September U.S. Trade Talks After Tariff Delay
    Bloomberg

    China Sticking to September U.S. Trade Talks After Tariff Delay

    (Bloomberg) -- Terms of Trade is a daily newsletter that untangles a world embroiled in trade wars. Sign up here. Chinese officials are sticking to their plan to visit Washington in September for face-to-face trade meetings, people familiar with the matter said, signaling that talks remain on track for now despite an abrupt escalation in tariff threats this month.The U.S. on Tuesday delayed the imposition of some new tariffs after top negotiators spoke on the phone, with President Donald Trump saying the encounter was “very productive,” and that he thinks Beijing wants to “do something dramatic” to end the impasse.That said, Chinese negotiators are not very optimistic of any imminent progress, one of the people said. Officials are unlikely to make concessions in the run up to October 1, the celebration of the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People’s Republic, the person said.S&P 500 futures erased their losses, the yen pared gains and the yuan rose slightly on the news. The Ministry of Commerce did not immediately respond to a request for comment.Tensions between the world’s two biggest economies rose significantly this month after Trump said he would tariff another $300 billion of Chinese goods, prompting Beijing to halt U.S. agricultural purchases and allow the yuan to weaken. The escalation brought into question whether talks planned for September would still go ahead, with Trump saying it’s "fine" if they don’t.Though Trump has often denied his tariffs have any impact on consumer prices and insists their cost is being borne by China, he also said the delay had been made “so it won’t be relevant to the Christmas shopping season.”Prospects for genuine progress in trade talks are low, especially as Chinese President Xi Jinping tackles weeks-long protests in Hong Kong that his government blames the U.S. for instigating.Whether or not the talks actually take place also depends on developments between now and then, according to one of the people. The next call between the negotiating teams will be in two weeks.Trump’s move to delay some tariffs involved the splitting of an almost $300 billion list of products from China into two separate ones. Lots of agricultural products, antiques, clothes, kitchenware and footwear remained on the list to be hit Sept. 1 -- with a total value of more than $110 billion, according to a Bloomberg News analysis of last year’s import figures.But big-ticket categories such as smart-phones, laptops, and children’s toys -- worth about $160 billion -- would only be subject to tariffs after Dec. 15, according to Tuesday’s announcement. Nearly $2 billion worth of products were removed from the combined lists including bibles and shipping containers.U.S. stocks surged on the news Tuesday. Apple Inc. spiked as much as 5.8% and Best Buy Co. climbed as much as 11% on optimism that the reprieve would boost electronics sales in the holiday season. Apparel retailers including Gap Inc. and L Brands Inc. rose, as did toymaker Hasbro Inc. and discount chain Dollar Tree Inc.The development was greeted in Beijing with some skepticism. Taoran Notes, a blog run by the state-run Economic Daily, wrote on Wednesday that the negotiators’ call was made on the invitation of the U.S., indicating that Trump is feeling the pressure of the tariffs.The call sends a “positive" signal, as it showed that the two sides are still in communication, and are willing to keep in touch, it said. But whether there will be progress or not depends on the U.S.’s actions, according to the blog."The outside world should have no illusion on China’s positions,” the blog said. "If the U.S. sticks to the maximum pressure tactic, then its goal won’t be reached even if additional tariffs are imposed on all Chinese goods.”To contact Bloomberg News staff for this story: Steven Yang in Beijing at kyang74@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Jeffrey Black at jblack25@bloomberg.net, ;John Liu at jliu42@bloomberg.net, Sharon ChenFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Trump Bows to Economic Fears in Move to Delay China Tariffs
    Bloomberg

    Trump Bows to Economic Fears in Move to Delay China Tariffs

    (Bloomberg) -- Terms of Trade is a daily newsletter that untangles a world embroiled in trade wars. Sign up here. President Donald Trump bowed to pressure from U.S. businesses and concerns over the economic fallout of his trade war with China, delaying the imposition of new tariffs on a wide variety of consumer products including toys and laptops until December.Tuesday’s move to at least hit the pause button in his fight with China came as senior officials on both sides had their first phone conversation since Trump threatened the tariffs at the beginning of this month. It also cheered markets that had been growing increasingly concerned over the impact of trade tensions on a slowing global economy. U.S. stocks halted a two-day slide, and Asian equities climbed.Trump said the latest conversation with China had been “productive” and that “they would really like to make a deal.” Though he has often denied his tariffs have any impact on consumer prices and insists their cost is being borne by China, he also said the delay had been made “so it won’t be relevant to the Christmas shopping season.”The move announced Tuesday involved the splitting of an almost $300 billion list of products from China into two separate ones. Lots of agricultural products, antiques, clothes, kitchenware and footwear remained on the list to be hit Sept. 1 -- with a total value of more than $110 billion, according to a Bloomberg News analysis of last year’s import figures. But big-ticket categories such as smart-phones, laptops, and children’s toys -- worth about $160 billion -- would only be subject to tariffs after Dec. 15, according to Tuesday’s announcement. Nearly $2 billion worth of products were removed from the combined lists including bibles and shipping containers.The delay “is an incrementally positive sign,” Goldman Sachs Group Inc. chief economist Jan Hatzius wrote in an note. “It suggests that the disruption in financial markets over the last several days could have led to a softening of the White House position.”China’s commerce and foreign ministries didn’t immediately respond to faxes seeking comment. While markets applauded the splitting of the new tariffs, some businesses expressed frustration with the sudden turnaround and the fact that they were once again being left to make important business decisions on the fly because of the president’s trade policies.“It’s too late and it’s not enough,” said Peter Bragdon, chief administrative officer for the Columbia Sportswear Co. “There’s continued chaotic policy making and incoherence coming out of Washington that makes it very hard for businesses in the United States to plan.”Columbia still has products including footwear such as waterproof hiking boots that would be hit with a 10% tariff come next month. While only 10%-15% of Columbia’s products were made in China, production of specialized footwear was difficult to move, Bragdon said, and the company had already warned customers it would be forced to raise some of its prices.In some cases the splitting of the tariffs will make life more complicated for retailers and other businesses. Some categories of golf shoes, for example, will be subject to a 10% tariff Sept. 1 while others will not be targeted until Dec. 15. Apple Inc.’s iPhones will not face new import taxes until mid-December. But the popular wireless Airpods that go with them will be taxed in September.Stocks surged on the news Tuesday. Apple Inc. spiked as much as 5.8% and Best Buy Co. climbed as much as 11% on optimism that the reprieve would boost electronics sales in the holiday season. Apparel retailers including Gap Inc. and L Brands Inc. rose, as did toymaker Hasbro Inc. and discount chain Dollar Tree Inc.“What this means is that retailers will be able to get their shipments in without the 10% tariff, which is a sigh of relief,” said Poonam Goyal, a retail analyst at Bloomberg Intelligence. “It definitely saves the holiday season.”With the Sept. 1 deadline, there wasn’t time for retailers to speed up ordering for the holiday season because it often takes more than four weeks for inventory to come from China, Goyal said.About $250 billion of Chinese goods have already been hit by 25% duties.David French, a spokesman for the National Retail Federation, said the organization was pleased by the delay on certain consumer goods but expressed caution.“Continued uncertainty for U.S. businesses and consumers is a drag on the economy,” he said. “What we really need is an effective strategy to address China’s unfair trade practices by working with our allies instead of using unilateral tariffs that cost American jobs and hurt consumers.”Chinese Vice Premier Liu He talked with U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin by phone on Tuesday, Chinese and U.S. officials said. Another conference call is planned again in two weeks. It’s still unclear if an in-person meeting would take place sometime in September.But whether the two sides had made any progress was unclear and some analysts saw Tuesday’s move to delay some tariffs as a sign of Trump’s political vulnerabilities at home as much as an olive branch to China.“It shows the increasing chaos of the administration’s trade strategy toward China. And despite the president’s claims, it’s the clearest sign yet that Trump actually does understand that the tariffs are hurting American companies and consumers,” said Edward Alden, a trade expert at the Council on Foreign Relations. “It will also further weaken the already slim chances for any negotiating progress in September. Why would the Chinese make difficult decisions if they can wait out Trump and wait for him to fold when the stock market sags?”Scott Kennedy, a China expert at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington, said there was still a danger of further escalation, especially around the tech sector. “But much of this is just keeping up appearances for a strategy that hasn’t succeeded,” he said. “That does not mean that the U.S. and China are likely to reach a trade deal, but rather that the relationship will be stuck in this purgatory for the remainder of the current administration.”What Our Economists Say“Speak to businesses and it’s the uncertainty -- not knowing if a tweet from President Donald Trump will break a crucial supply chain or block access to a market -- that’s weighing on investment and hiring decisions. A surprise delay to tariffs, and the creation of a new artificial deadline on Dec. 15, will do little to resolve it.”Tom Orlik, Bloomberg EconomicsClick here for the full note.The International Monetary Fund last month cited trade tensions as one of the biggest risks to the global economy as it downgraded its 2019 growth forecast, while Goldman Sachs has said there’s growing concerns that the trade war will trigger a U.S. recession. A Bloomberg News August survey of economists gave a 35% probability of a recession in the next 12 months, up from 31% previously.Trump’s Aug. 1 announcement about the new duties ended a tentative trade truce that he forged with Chinese President Xi Jinping at the end of June in Japan, just as the two sides were resuming negotiations. In the past week tensions have escalated further as the U.S. Treasury Department formally labeled China a currency manipulator.(Updates with Asia markets from second paragraph.)\--With assistance from Jonathan Roeder, Jordyn Holman, Joe Deaux, Justin Sink, Eddie Spence, Dominic Carey, Chris Middleton, Jeffrey Black and Jiyeun Lee.To contact the reporters on this story: Shawn Donnan in Washington at sdonnan@bloomberg.net;Jenny Leonard in Washington at jleonard67@bloomberg.net;Olivia Rockeman in New York at orockeman1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Margaret Collins at mcollins45@bloomberg.net, ;Brendan Murray at brmurray@bloomberg.net, Sarah McGregor, Robert JamesonFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Why Ralph Lauren, Urban Outfitters, and Gap Are Trading Higher Tuesday
    Motley Fool

    Why Ralph Lauren, Urban Outfitters, and Gap Are Trading Higher Tuesday

    Delayed China tariffs on certain products is great news for companies preparing for the back-to-school and holiday shopping seasons.

  • Motley Fool

    Stock Market News: Apple, Gap Soar on Tariff Delays

    The stock market jumped Tuesday as relations between the U.S. and China appeared to improve.

  • Can Soft Namesake Brand Hurt Gap's (GPS) Earnings Again in Q2?
    Zacks

    Can Soft Namesake Brand Hurt Gap's (GPS) Earnings Again in Q2?

    Softness in Gap's (GPS) namesake brand is hurting comps and the top line for a while now. Persistence of this softness is likely to impede the company's earnings in second-quarter fiscal 2019.

  • Business Wire

    Gap Inc. to Report Second Quarter 2019 Results on August 22

    Gap Inc. will report its second quarter 2019 earnings results by press release on August 22, 2019 at 1:15 p.m. Pacific Time.

  • Should The Gap, Inc. (NYSE:GPS) Be Part Of Your Dividend Portfolio?
    Simply Wall St.

    Should The Gap, Inc. (NYSE:GPS) Be Part Of Your Dividend Portfolio?

    Is The Gap, Inc. (NYSE:GPS) a good dividend stock? How can we tell? Dividend paying companies with growing earnings...

  • Business Wire

    Gap Inc. Signs Renewable Energy Agreement With Enel Green Power to Achieve 2020 Emissions-Reduction Goal, Sets Course for 100% Clean Energy By 2030

    Global apparel retailer Gap Inc. (GPS) today announced that it has signed a 90 Megawatt (MW) virtual power purchase agreement (VPPA) for the Aurora Wind Project with Enel Green Power North America, marking one of the largest offsite renewable energy contracts by an apparel retailer. The 12-year agreement is Gap Inc.’s latest renewable energy deal and will enable the company to reach its 2020 goal to reduce absolute Scope 1 and 2 greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions for its owned and operated facilities by 50 percent compared to 2015.

  • American City Business Journals

    Flex office space company aims for one million square feet in S.F.

    Knotel now controls 500,000 square feet of space in San Francisco with plans to reach 1 million by year end.

  • GuruFocus.com

    Jerome Dodson's Parnassus Endeavor Fund 2nd-Quarter Commentary

    Discussion of markets and holdings Continue reading...

  • GuruFocus.com

    Jerome Dodson Comments on GAP

    Guru stock highlight Continue reading...

  • Can a Family Survive on the U.S. Minimum Wage? (WMT, COST)
    Investopedia

    Can a Family Survive on the U.S. Minimum Wage? (WMT, COST)

    As the political debate roars on, the numbers are clear: Even two full-timers at U.S. minimum wage can't keep a family of four above the poverty line.

  • GuruFocus.com

    Quilter Investors LTD Buys Medtronic PLC, Gap Inc, Sells Apple Inc, Altria Group Inc, S&P ...

    Investment company Quilter Investors LTD (Current Portfolio) buys Medtronic PLC, Gap Inc, sells Apple Inc, Altria Group Inc, S&P; Global Inc, Intuit Inc, Visa Inc during the 3-months ended 2019Q2, according to the most recent filings of the investment company, Quilter Investors LTD. Continue reading...

  • US Stocks Deep in the Red on Thursday
    GuruFocus.com

    US Stocks Deep in the Red on Thursday

    Cigna slides despite strong 2nd-quarter results Continue reading...

  • MarketWatch

    Gap, Kohl's, Nordstrom among retail stock declines after Trump announces tariffs

    Shares Gap Inc. (down 8.4%), Kohl's Corp. (down 8.1%), and Nordstrom Inc. (down 7.2%) are among the retail stocks sliding downward after President Trump announced a fresh round of tariffs on China. Trump tweeted that trade talks are continuing, but that the U.S. will impose 10% tariffs on an additional $300 billion of Chinese goods on September 1. Other retail stocks feeling the pinch include American Eagle Outfitters Inc. , Macy's (both down nearly 7%) and J.C. Penney Co. Inc. (down 8.4%). The SPDR S&P Retail ETF , down 3.6% after the news, has taken a 16.4% tumble over the last year while the S&P 500 index is up 5.1% for the past 12 months.

  • Pampers Price Hikes Hold a Lesson for the Gap
    Bloomberg

    Pampers Price Hikes Hold a Lesson for the Gap

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Shares of Procter & Gamble Co. reached an all-time high this week after the company released a blockbuster quarterly earnings report. Organic sales – a measure that strips out currency movements and other factors – were the highest in more than a decade, with each of its major divisions posting at least mid-single digit growth from a year earlier on this measure. An upbeat sales and earnings forecast for 2020 capped off the win.It’s a remarkable change in momentum for a consumer-goods behemoth that only a year ago was licking its wounds after a bruising proxy fight and was desperate to show it could do better amid tough competition from insurgent and private brands.So how did P&G do it? Many factors, including a new organizational structure and revamped marketing strategy, are playing a role. Importantly, though, it’s also done a good job of figuring out how to get shoppers to pay more for its products. It’s here that I want to focus, as there are some lessons in what P&G has done for another corner of the consumer world – the apparel industry – which badly needs to do the same thing.One way P&G has gotten consumers to splurge is through product innovation. Pampers Pure – a version of its familiar diaper that is made with plant-based and sustainable materials – has helped lift sales recently in its baby division. This product, new to the market in 2018, capitalizes on consumers’ growing preference for eco-friendly products while also giving the company a reason to charge a premium price. This year, it followed up with Pure products in its Always and Tampax brands.Higher-priced items have also been driving strong growth in its laundry division. Tide Pods and Gain Flings carry a 50% price premium compared to liquid detergent, and yet shoppers scoop them up because the format offers obvious convenience.Here’s why I think the apparel industry should pay attention to this dynamic, even though selling consumer staples is a somewhat different beast. Chains such as Gap Inc., Ann Taylor and Macy’s Inc., have become over-reliant on discounts, which can cheapen their image and hurt margins. Lately, their approaches seem to largely center on using technology to present more personalized deals, or to introduce fresh loyalty programs as a way to offer value. And it hasn’t done much to return them to relevance.What if, instead, they focused on product innovation, like P&G does, to get people to pay full price? In apparel, there are at least a couple of ways to do this.One is working to develop garments with clear functionality or performance advantages, such as a white t-shirt that isn’t see-through or pants that don’t shrink in the wash. This, in fact, is how  Lululemon Athletica Inc.  has become a rare bright spot in the clothing business. Women are willing to pay $98 for its leggings because its distinct fabrics and designs result in a comfort and durability that shoppers deem worth the price tag. No wonder the athletic apparel retailer has booming sales and practically never discounts.Product innovation could also mean fashion newness – creating pieces that people simply feel like they have to have. As Andrea Felsted and I noted in a recent column, Inditex SA’s Zara does it all the time. J. Crew Group, for all its current woes, managed to win with fashion innovation during the apex of the Mickey Drexler-Jenna Lyons era, when its sequins-as-daywear and oversize necklaces became a go-to look every chain was forced to imitate.It isn’t just product innovation, though, that has allowed P&G to win with pricing; it has also raised prices on existing items under banners such as Bounty, Charmin and Puffs as it has sought to offset elevated commodity costs. In some ways, this is a risky move, as private-label brands are there as a cheaper alternative.Here’s the thing, though: P&G is fond of saying “performance drives brand choice.” In other words, executives trust that, for all but the most budget-conscious shoppers, people are going to be loyal to the product they think works best.Clothing sellers should consider embracing this philosophy. Mid-priced apparel chains appear to be battle-scarred by two factors: the recession that ended a decade ago, and the concurrent competitive incursions from value-oriented players such as H&M operator Hennes & Mauritz AB and TJX Cos., owner of the T.J. Maxx chain. That confluence of events seemed to spook them into believing that the only thing that would ever get shoppers to open their wallets is discounts.I don’t think that’s true. In today’s upbeat economy, I am confident plenty of once-devoted Banana Republic, Loft or Express Inc. shoppers would pony up for work attire they perceived to be durable, or for a date-night dress they thought was a knockout. The mental calculus wouldn’t be so different from why that same woman springs for Charmin even when the generic toilet paper is right next to it on the shelf: It performs better, so it’s worth the cost.Mall-based clothing chains are in a rut. It’s high time for some more creative thinking – and perhaps some unusual inspiration – if they’re going to dig out of it.To contact the author of this story: Sarah Halzack at shalzack@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Beth Williams at bewilliams@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Sarah Halzack is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the consumer and retail industries. She was previously a national retail reporter for the Washington Post.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • An Olympic medalist who split with Nike over maternity rights has found a new sponsor
    Quartz

    An Olympic medalist who split with Nike over maternity rights has found a new sponsor

    Track star Allyson Felix hopes her new deal "is the start to redefining what sponsorship looks like for female athletes."

  • Benzinga

    Gap's Athletic Brand Signs Olympic Star Allyson Felix

    Felix is one of the most decorated track and field athletes in U.S. history and will join Gap's athletic apparel brand, Athleta, as its first-ever sponsored athlete, Gap said in a press release. Felix will work with Athleta to help design and develop high performance run and train products. "I am particularly moved by the community of women and girls Athleta is empowering through sport," the six-time Olympic gold medal and three-time silver winner said in the press release.