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  • Goldman Sachs Might End Up Regretting Apple Card Partnership
    Motley Fool

    Goldman Sachs Might End Up Regretting Apple Card Partnership

    A looming recession could force Goldman to eat some Apple Card losses.

  • Your Guide to the 10 Biggest Bank Stocks
    Motley Fool

    Your Guide to the 10 Biggest Bank Stocks

    Here’s your guide to the largest publicly traded financial institutions in the U.S.

  • Author explores Koch Industries, a company that specializes in the stuff that underpins civilization
    Yahoo Finance

    Author explores Koch Industries, a company that specializes in the stuff that underpins civilization

    Koch Industries possesses a complicated legacy, one which has seen its leadership both celebrated and vilified for the better part its eighty-year history. What does the future hold for the enormous conglomerate?

  • What You Need to Know About the WeWork IPO
    Investopedia

    What You Need to Know About the WeWork IPO

    WeWork, the office space sharing startup burning cash at a rapid rate, has filed for its highly-anticipated IPO.

  • Stock market news: August 14, 2019
    Yahoo Finance

    Stock market news: August 14, 2019

    Stocks posted their worst session of 2019 Wednesday after the bond market flashed its brightest warning signal yet presaging a potential recession.

  • Financial Times

    Goldman Sachs rivals circle after top banker jumps to Elliott

    Competitors of Goldman Sachs’ market-leading activist defence advisory business have seized on an opportunity to snatch away corporate clients, after the head of the unit quit to join the hedge fund Elliott Management. The gamekeeper-turned-poacher move by Steven Barg, a Goldman partner who advised chief executives and boards on how to fend off attacks from activist hedge funds, is regarded as rare across the industry, after his resignation last week. Since then, Goldman’s competitors have approached some of Mr Barg’s top clients to pitch their own business and make reassurances that their bankers will not jump to an activist fund, according to people with knowledge of the conversations.

  • Financial Times

    Elliott bags Goldman’s Barg

    Top advisory shops, including the likes of Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley, have long shunned activists for fear of alienating their corporate clients. As a result, shareholder activism has become a lucrative business for banks hoping to cosy up to corporates in search of future business and hefty fees.

  • Can Apple Card Really Boost iPhone Loyalty?
    Motley Fool

    Can Apple Card Really Boost iPhone Loyalty?

    The answer will depend on a wide range of factors...but probably not.

  • Investors are bracing for financial Armageddon
    Yahoo Finance

    Investors are bracing for financial Armageddon

    The plunge in the 10-year yield is mildly alarming. Should investors worry?

  • Benzinga

    Challenger Banks: Who's Who?

    Challenger banks are continuing to disrupt the competitive landscape in the financial services sector. They are small retail banks that have been set up with the intention of competing for business from ...

  • Bloomberg

    What Markets Are Telling Argentina’s Next Leader

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Monday’s panic over Argentina’s weekend election results — the peso fell 15% and the S&P Merval stock index suffered its second worst rout in 70 years — may have been a bit overwrought. It was a primary election, after all, and the winning opposition candidate, Alberto Fernandez, has denied any intention to default on Argentina’s debt. But it sends an important message to Fernandez, and his running mate, former President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner: Before the October election, they must convince stakeholders in Argentina’s economy that they understand the need to carry on with incumbent President Mauricio Macri’s economic reforms, if by another name.Fernandez’s win was such a landslide, it sparked fears of a return to debt default, uncontrolled inflation and frenzied selloffs, precisely the sort of trouble that Argentines thought they had left behind. But the new market mess is a panic foretold.Argentina’s leaders have been fatally misreading economic cues for decades. Misguided austerity and a flawed tether to the U.S. dollar in the late 1990s set off a currency collapse, riots, a run on banks, four presidents unseated in one 10-day stretch and, by 2002, the world’s largest sovereign debt default.That debacle laid ground for the next. The Peronist tag team of Nestor Kirchner (2003-2007) and his wife and successor Cristina Fernandez (2007-2015) vowed to reclaim the country from predatory creditors, and briefly revived growth — before going on to squander the global commodities boom and turn South America’s second biggest economy into one of its most dysfunctional markets.That wreckage helped propel Macri into office in 2015, on his market-friendly promise to restore Argentina to economic normalcy and the international community’s good graces. And he kept his word. Macri mended relations with global lenders, secured a rescue package from the International Monetary Fund, allowed the peso to float and belatedly engaged in the kind of fiscal probity that his populist predecessors had scorned. Yet his structural reforms were hesitant. And he faced a record drought that punished Argentina’s competitive farm sector, as well as a global selloff of emerging market assets. So he failed to deliver growth, jobs or stable prices — much less persuade voters to give him a second chance.Credit the Peronists for spinning Macri’s grief into electoral gold. Barring an unlikely comeback — Eurasia Group rates Macri’s reelection prospects at just 10% — Fernandez is likely to be elected president in October, or in a runoff in December.Yet here’s the irony: Macri may have moved too slowly and diffidently to put Argentina’s public accounts fully in order, but his policies are beginning to coax the country in the right direction. Whoever moves into the Casa Rosada in December will find little alternative but to carry them through.Fernandez must now be clear that he understands that any return to government economic controls and protectionism would be folly. Yesterday, he said Argentina needs to rework its economic model, but didn’t explain how. He’ll have to do better than that. As Alberto Ramos of Goldman Sachs put it, “Fernandez not only needs to say the right things, but to convince people he means them, or else the markets will start to second guess him.”To boost his credibility, Fernandez could name someone with a track record in finance to reach out to creditors and the IMF, clearly signaling his commitment to follow through with the fiscal consolidation Macri has put in motion. Leave it to the ecumenical Peronists to work those free-market principles into the populist gospel of reform.Such efforts may still fall flat unless Fernandez, who has never run for national office, also shows what sort of leader he means to be. Can voters expect the pragmatist and conciliator he was when he broke ranks with the confrontational Cristina in 2008? Or will they be left with a mouthpiece for the mercurial Peronist power broker, bent on ruling by proxy and spending money Argentina doesn’t have?The mayhem in the markets is a cautionary tale. Unless Fernandez can shed his slate’s populist legacy and deepen his rival’s policy agenda, he will stumble. After a decade of economic chaos brought on by willful politicians, the last thing Argentines need is another tone-deaf leader.To contact the author of this story: Mac Margolis at mmargolis14@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Mary Duenwald at mduenwald@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Mac Margolis is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering Latin and South America. He was a reporter for Newsweek and is the author of “The Last New World: The Conquest of the Amazon Frontier.”For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Investing.com

    Bitcoin Falls Below $11,000 as Bulls Grow Weary

    Investing.com – Bitcoin fell below the $11,000 level Tuesday, as the U.S. Security and Exchange Commission delayed a decision on whether to greenlight a new investment vehicle to trade the popular crypto.

  • Stock Market News For Aug 13, 2019
    Zacks

    Stock Market News For Aug 13, 2019

    Wall Street closed sharply lower on Monday following intensification of U.S.-China trade dispute, heightened geopolitical issues and concerns about a global economic slowdown.

  • Edgy Markets Add to Gold's Lure: 4 Stocks to Buy
    Zacks

    Edgy Markets Add to Gold's Lure: 4 Stocks to Buy

    With Trump reluctant to strike a deal with China, and turmoil in Hong Kong and Argentina adding to trade tensions, the appeal for gold as a safe-haven asset has increased.

  • Financial Times

    US to delay some tariffs on Chinese goods

    on a series of consumer goods imported from China — including laptops and cell phones — until December, in a bid to ease fears about the trade war’s impact on markets and the economy. The value of the goods that would see delayed tariffs is about $156bn, based on full-year 2018 figures, according to an FT analysis.

  • Varsity gaming: Local universities adapt to the rise of esports
    American City Business Journals

    Varsity gaming: Local universities adapt to the rise of esports

    Chris Hower nearly failed out of high school because of his obsession with video games. Now, nearly two decades after his teenage passion began, the 32-year-old Navy veteran and current undergraduate student at Edinboro University has managed to turn his cherished pastime into a job with pay as the head coach of Edinboro’s new varsity esports team.

  • Investing.com

    Crypto Prices Fall; U.S. SEC Delays Three Bitcoin ETF Proposals

    Investing.com - Cryptocurrency prices fell on Tuesday in Asia following news that the United States Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) delayed its decision on three Bitcoin exchange-traded fund proposals.

  • GuruFocus.com

    US Indexes Close Lower Monday With Concerns Over China

    S&P; 500 down 1.23% Continue reading...

  • Value Screeners Identify Opportunities as Kids Return to School
    GuruFocus.com

    Value Screeners Identify Opportunities as Kids Return to School

    Detailed look at value screens in light of volatile first 2 weeks of August Continue reading...

  • Stocks - Dow Sinks as Trade Jitters, Growth Worries Slam Markets Again
    Investing.com

    Stocks - Dow Sinks as Trade Jitters, Growth Worries Slam Markets Again

    Investing.com – Stocks fell sharply Monday afternoon and money poured into bonds again as worries about global trade battles grew.

  • The Apple Card's best feature is its privacy
    Yahoo Finance

    The Apple Card's best feature is its privacy

    The Apple Card is here and it's best feature is its privacy.

  • Benzinga

    With Apple Card, Is Goldman Sachs No Longer Exclusively For The Rich And Famous?

    Apple partnered with Goldman Sachs to issue a credit card and the bank has sole say on who gets accepted. In "somewhat of a surprise," Goldman Sachs is accepting customers with low and subprime credit scores, CNBC's banking reporter Hugh Son said on "Squawk Box" Friday morning. Statistically speaking at least "some" iPhone users will have a less-than-ideal credit score.

  • Goldman Sachs Falls as Top International Executive Charged in 1MDB Scandal
    Investing.com

    Goldman Sachs Falls as Top International Executive Charged in 1MDB Scandal

    Investing.com - Goldman Sachs (NYSE:GS) fell in midday trade on Friday after reports that 17 current and former bankers, including its CEO of its international division, were criminally charged by Malaysia for their involvement in the 1Malaysia Development Berhad scandal.

  • Companies to watch: Yelp beats, CBS streaming growth, Goldman & Alibaba execs charged in Malaysia
    Yahoo Finance

    Companies to watch: Yelp beats, CBS streaming growth, Goldman & Alibaba execs charged in Malaysia

    Yelp, CBS, Fastly and Goldman Sachs are the companies to watch.

  • 3 major steps Wall Street can take to become more diverse: Goldman Sachs Foundation president
    Yahoo Finance

    3 major steps Wall Street can take to become more diverse: Goldman Sachs Foundation president

    Asahi Pompey, Goldman Sachs’s global head of corporate engagement and president of the Goldman Sachs Foundation, has a formula to try to increase diversity on Wall Street.