HMC - Honda Motor Co., Ltd.

NYSE - NYSE Delayed Price. Currency in USD
27.00
+0.53 (+2.00%)
At close: 4:00PM EDT

27.00 0.00 (0.00%)
After hours: 4:15PM EDT

Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Gain actionable insight from technical analysis on financial instruments, to help optimize your trading strategies
Chart Events
Bullishpattern detected
Long-term KST

Long-term KST

Performance Outlook
  • Short Term
    2W - 6W
  • Mid Term
    6W - 9M
  • Long Term
    9M+
Previous Close26.47
Open26.80
Bid27.02 x 1800
Ask27.10 x 1100
Day's Range26.79 - 27.12
52 Week Range19.38 - 29.44
Volume525,543
Avg. Volume1,204,610
Market Cap46.246B
Beta (5Y Monthly)1.29
PE Ratio (TTM)4.66
EPS (TTM)N/A
Earnings DateN/A
Forward Dividend & Yield1.04 (3.93%)
Ex-Dividend DateDec 27, 2019
1y Target EstN/A
Fair Value is the appropriate price for the shares of a company, based on its earnings and growth rate also interpreted as when P/E Ratio = Growth Rate. Estimated return represents the projected annual return you might expect after purchasing shares in the company and holding them over the default time horizon of 5 years, based on the EPS growth rate that we have projected.
Fair Value
XX.XX
Undervalued
20% Est. Return
Research that delivers an independent perspective, consistent methodology and actionable insight
Related Research
View more
  • Economic Data Deluge
    Zacks

    Economic Data Deluge

    Economic Data Deluge

  • Auto sales rebounded in May after dismal April
    Yahoo Finance Video

    Auto sales rebounded in May after dismal April

    Yahoo Finance’s Alexis Christoforous, Brian Sozzi, and Pras Subramanian break down auto sales numbers for the month of May.

  • May Auto Sales Reports Today; Toyota (TM) -25.7%
    Zacks

    May Auto Sales Reports Today; Toyota (TM) -25.7%

    The S&P 500 is now above the 200-day trading average, suggesting another possible breakout to the upside.

  • Financial Times

    Reopened UK showrooms offer glimmer of hope for car industry

    On the outskirts of Reading, the first glimmers of hope can be seen for Britain’s battered car industry. Hours after the town’s Honda dealership reopened after a 10-week closure, Sam and Janet Weller brought their old Civic to part-exchange for a newer vehicle. It was the fourth walk-in appointment for Honda within hours of opening, along with a trickle of phone inquiries and some pre-booked appointments.

  • First Manned Flight Is Just One Step for SpaceX
    Bloomberg

    First Manned Flight Is Just One Step for SpaceX

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- The SpaceX Crew Dragon capsule that’s orbiting the Earth with two U.S. astronauts is the picture of New Space Age glamour. It’s a sleek, stylish commercially made capsule that’s destined to be featured beside Italian sports cars in future design textbooks. Just don’t tell that to Elon Musk, SpaceX’s chief executive and chief designer. “Is a Ferrari more reliable than a Toyota Corolla or a Honda Civic?” he once asked a space journalist. The answer, of course, is that the simpler sedans are far more reliable than the well-crafted sports car. So SpaceX, Musk made clear, was going to make Corollas.It’s a practically minded outlook for a company founded on the galactically large ambition to transform humanity into a multiplanetary species. But Musk and SpaceX implicitly understand something that national space programs haven’t really accepted: Success in space exploration isn’t, ultimately, about achieving “firsts” like the moon landing. Rather, it’s repeat business that will establish moon colonies and Musk’s Martian city. To get that business, SpaceX has to show that national space programs, with their expensive, Ferrari-like rockets, capsules and contractors, won’t get there. On Saturday, it succeeded.The 20th century space race wasn’t about the money, it was about the record books. The respective financial strengths of the U.S. and Soviet systems certainly played a role, but when national pride is at stake, performance matters more than costs. For decades, NASA, in particular, internalized that priority by adopting cost-plus contracts with its contractors. Under these arrangements, NASA agrees to pay the value of a project’s development costs, plus an associated fee (often about 10%). It’s an excellent system for encouraging contractors to invest in difficult, long-term projects with hazy costs.But if the goal is to create something that works repeatedly, and on-budget, cost-plus is a problem. After all, if a contractor’s fees increase during project delays, then that contractor lacks an incentive to control costs and finish on deadline. Making matters more difficult, expensive government programs must meet political requirements that no profit-seeking business would ever consider. The development of the 1970s-era space shuttle was spread out over states and produced an outrageously expensive “reusable” rocket that took thousands of hours to prepare for reuse. In 2012, Musk correctly called the shuttle “a Ferrari to the nth power.”By that point, Musk, too, was working with the U.S. government. But unlike traditional NASA contractors such as the Boeing Co, he was doing it on a fixed-fee basis. So, rather than get paid along the way, SpaceX accepted a fixed fee to build a technology, and whatever wasn’t used in development could be kept as profit.That doesn’t mean cutting corners. NASA requires that SpaceX’s technology meet its high safety standards (often to Musk’s chagrin). But it does mean that SpaceX has a strong incentive to find ways to control costs while building cutting-edge technology. For example, rather than try to perfect a single rocket for a flawless first launch, SpaceX opted for iterative design, whereby it launched — and failed — early prototypes repeatedly, as a means to learn from its mistakes and speed up rocket design. It’s an approach that differs substantially from traditional aerospace companies, which spend years and money perfecting a design before flying it (the Ferrari approach). Likewise, SpaceX, freed from political constraints, concentrated its design and testing in single locations, rather than spread it out geographically. It’s what any rational for-profit manufacturer would do.This approach has been fruitful. The rocket that carried the Crew Dragon capsule into orbit is a Falcon 9, from a family of rockets developed for $390 million with assistance from NASA under fixed-price contracts. According to a 2011 NASA report, the cost would’ve been $1.7 billion to $4 billion if the same rocket had been developed using traditional means. More dramatically, the development of the Falcon 9 has reduced the cost of a space launch by a factor of 20, at least. A kilogram launched on the space shuttle, which last flew in 2011, cost about $54,500. A kilogram on the Falcon 9 runs about $2,700.Of course, launching humans into space is more difficult and expensive than launching cargo. Even so, SpaceX managed to lap more traditional contractors. In 2011, NASA announced plans to build the Space Launch System, a massive new rocket to send Americans back to the moon. To save on costs and time, the rocket was to be built using engines and other components from the space shuttle program. Ominously, it was also to be built by the Boeing Co under a cost-plus contract. In 2014, NASA committed to a November 2018 launch date at a cost of $9.7 billion. Then the launch dates started slipping, all to the benefit of Boeing. By March, the launch date had moved to the second half of 2021, with costs escalating to $18.3 billion. If and when it flies, each rocket will exceed $1 billion — more than three times what it cost to develop the Falcon 9.For now, SpaceX’s approach is the clear winner, but its challenges are far from over. Above all, the company must demonstrate that its relatively inexpensive human-capable flights have a commercial market — an idea that’s far from certain. Similarly, the company will need to prove the business case for its longer-term, and substantially more expensive, ambitious exploration program. But today, at least, the Musk’s Corolla is beating the Ferrari by millions of miles.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Adam Minter is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist. He is the author of “Junkyard Planet: Travels in the Billion-Dollar Trash Trade” and "Secondhand: Travels in the New Global Garage Sale."For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Nissan (NSANY) Incurs Loss in FY19, Issues EV Ariya Update
    Zacks

    Nissan (NSANY) Incurs Loss in FY19, Issues EV Ariya Update

    Nissan (NSANY) reports net loss of 671.2 billion yen in fiscal 2019, mainly due to the COVID-19 pandemic, which hurt the company's production, sales and other business activities in all regions.

  • Reuters

    CORRECTED-Japanese automakers' April sales halved

    Global auto sales for Japanese carmakers halved in April as the coronavirus pandemic forced governments to impose lockdowns that left streets empty and showrooms deserted. Japan's top eight automakers together posted a decline of 50.1% in April sales, according to a Reuters calculation. Toyota Motor's worldwide sales including units Daihatsu and Hino fell 45% to 472,703 vehicles - the fourth straight month of declines.

  • Reuters

    Mexico's auto industry restart gathers steam, Ford still waiting

    Mexico's auto industry reopening picked up pace on Tuesday, with Fiat Chrysler and BMW AG joining peers in gradually dusting off operations even as the wait for approvals slowed the return of Ford Motor Co and other companies. Fiat Chrysler on Tuesday began reopening two facilities in the central Mexican city of Toluca after a gradual restart of its operations in the northern city of Saltillo a day earlier, said a company spokesman. The announcement means two of Detroit's Big Three automakers have begun restarting Mexican operations.

  • Why Ford, General Motors, and Honda Stocks Are Up Today
    Motley Fool

    Why Ford, General Motors, and Honda Stocks Are Up Today

    What happened Shares of several global automakers were rising on Tuesday, as auto factories around the world continued to ramp up after shutting down in March amid the COVID-19 pandemic.  Here's where things stood for these three companies' stocks as of 2:30 p.

  • Toyota, Nissan and Honda gear up for Mexico reboot after COVID-19 lockdowns
    Reuters

    Toyota, Nissan and Honda gear up for Mexico reboot after COVID-19 lockdowns

    Japanese automakers Toyota, Nissan and Honda said they are gradually restarting in Mexico as the nation's automotive industry reboots in line with a broader economic reopening, despite still-high numbers of new coronavirus cases. Mexican officials in mid-May said the automotive industry could exit the coronavirus lockdown before June 1 if approved safety measures were in place. Toyota Motor Corp and Nissan Motor Co Ltd told Reuters on Monday that they were preparing to gradually resume operations, and Honda Motor Co Ltd last Friday said it had begun a gradual return to operations.

  • Reuters

    RPT-In China's auto market, worries grow that cashback deals and gifts presage damaging price war

    HANGZHOU, China/SHANGHAI, May 25 (Reuters) - Cashback offers, up to 10 free oil changes, generous prepaid gasoline cards - these are just some of the giveaways China's auto dealerships are using to woo customers out and about after spending much of February and March in lockdown. Cui Peng, a Geely sales manager in the eastern city of Hangzhou, says unit sales at his dealership jumped 30% in April from March and they are hoping for 25% growth in May.

  • Reuters

    In China's auto market, worries grow that cashback deals and gifts presage damaging price war

    HANGZHOU, China/SHANGHAI, May 25 (Reuters) - Cashback offers, up to 10 free oil changes, generous prepaid gasoline cards - these are just some of the giveaways China's auto dealerships are using to woo customers out and about after spending much of February and March in lockdown. Cui Peng, a Geely sales manager in the eastern city of Hangzhou, says unit sales at his dealership jumped 30% in April from March and they are hoping for 25% growth in May.

  • 2022 Honda Civic next generation spied in Type R form
    Autoblog

    2022 Honda Civic next generation spied in Type R form

    Last year, we learned that Honda would be wrapping up production of the Honda Civic hatchback in the U.K. in 2021, and production would move to North America for the next generation. The hatch has a gentler descent to the stubby deck, and it loses the split rear window. If it means we're finally getting the newer, better infotainment from Honda like that in the Accord, it will be worth it.

  • 2020 Honda Civic Type R First Drive | Better driving and better value
    Autoblog

    2020 Honda Civic Type R First Drive | Better driving and better value

    At three years old, the 2020 Honda Civic Type R is getting its first midcycle refresh. Under the skin, Honda has focused on brakes and suspension. The new Type R now has two-piece rotors that Honda says dissipate heat better.

  • Empty trains, clogged roads: Americans get behind the wheel to avoid transit
    Reuters

    Empty trains, clogged roads: Americans get behind the wheel to avoid transit

    As Americans plan for life after pandemic lockdowns, many want to avoid public transport and use a car instead, straining already underfunded transit systems and risking an increase in road congestion and pollution. Similar dynamics have played out in China, where transit ridership in large cities remains down about 35% two months after lockdown restrictions were lifted while car purchases increase. Ford Motor Co Chief Operating Officer Jim Farley said the company has seen an uptick in Chinese demand for higher-priced utility vehicles fueled by upscale office workers who used to take public transport.

  • 2021 Acura TLX to revive Type S, get turbocharged V6
    Autoblog

    2021 Acura TLX to revive Type S, get turbocharged V6

    The 2021 Acura TLX will revive the sporty Type S model after a 10-year moratorium, and this time around, it's getting a turbocharged V6, further setting it apart from other sedans in the Honda corporate family. Acura says the new TLX will draw heavily upon the styling shown on two of its recent concepts: the Precision, which was shown in 2016, and the Type S, which was shown last year. The evolution of the styling is obvious even from Acura's darkened teaser image, which depicts a slightly more curvaceous take on 2019's Type S while retaining most of the same key design elements, including the quad-outlet exhaust and pronounced underbody diffuser.

  • 2020 Honda Pilot Luggage Test | Big, boxy and clever
    Autoblog

    2020 Honda Pilot Luggage Test | Big, boxy and clever

    The Hyundai Palisade came close as it was able to fit the four biggest bags in my travel arsenal. On paper, the 2020 Honda Pilot should be among that smallest group, providing 16.5 cubic-feet of space when the third row is raised. The Highlander is 16 cubic-feet, while the Palisade has 18 and the Atlas 20.6.

  • Auto Stock Roundup: TM Beats on Q4 Earnings, HMC Incurs Loss & More
    Zacks

    Auto Stock Roundup: TM Beats on Q4 Earnings, HMC Incurs Loss & More

    Both Toyota (TM) and Honda (HMC) report dismal year-over-year results for fiscal fourth-quarter 2020, thanks to the coronavirus outbreak.

  • 2021 Toyota Venza vs midsize crossovers: How they compare on paper
    Autoblog

    2021 Toyota Venza vs midsize crossovers: How they compare on paper

    The revived 2021 Toyota Venza is merely the latest in a steady flow of newcomers to the growing midsize crossover segment. Toyota’s entry into this crowded — but somewhat narrowly defined — midsize two-row class comes out of left field, for better or worse. In addition to the Chevy Blazer and the Honda Passport — both of which were new for 2019 — the new Toyota’s primary competition will include the Ford Edge, Hyundai Santa Fe and Nissan Murano.

  • Can CARZ ETF Gain Despite Mixed Auto Earnings?
    Zacks

    Can CARZ ETF Gain Despite Mixed Auto Earnings?

    Let's take a look at the impact of the major automaker earnings releases on automobiles ETFs amid the coronavirus crisis.

  • Junkyard Gem: 1983 Honda Accord Sedan with 411,794 Miles
    Autoblog

    Junkyard Gem: 1983 Honda Accord Sedan with 411,794 Miles

    With more recent vehicles, electronic digital odometers won't display unless you power up the main ECU— theoretically possible in a junkyard, but a real hassle. The most likely old cars to rack up interstellar mileage (Mercedes-Benz diesels) are also among the first to have their instrument clusters harvested by boneyard-prowling eBay sellers. Fortunately, Honda began installing six-digit odometers around 1981, and so today's Junkyard Gem (found last winter in a Denver car graveyard) can share its very impressive final odo reading with us.

  • Acura RLX will die after 2020 model year
    Autoblog

    Acura RLX will die after 2020 model year

    Only Acura knows why its flagship RLX sedan is still on sale; every year that we had occasion to remember the RLX — which wasn't every year — seemed like a good year to let the car die peacefully. Automotive News reports the deed is finally done, or rather, will be at the end of 2020, when Acura discontinues the model that started with the RL in 1996. Honda told U.S. dealers yesterday that in other markets like Japan, the four-door will continue to sell as the Honda Legend.

  • Honda CR-V vs. Subaru Forester Cupholder Test | King of cups
    Autoblog

    Honda CR-V vs. Subaru Forester Cupholder Test | King of cups

    When I got our long-term Subaru Forester back from the shop to fix a mysterious source of moisture, I also happened to have a Honda CR-V Hybrid taking up temporary residence in my driveway. Two front cupholders on the center console, one in each front door, one in each rear door, and two in the center armrest that folds down in each rear row.