HPQ - HP Inc.

NYSE - NYSE Delayed Price. Currency in USD
16.85
-0.11 (-0.65%)
At close: 4:02PM EDT
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous Close16.96
Open16.86
Bid16.85 x 1000
Ask16.98 x 3000
Day's Range16.75 - 16.98
52 Week Range15.93 - 25.72
Volume12,184,419
Avg. Volume12,065,320
Market Cap24.97B
Beta (3Y Monthly)1.24
PE Ratio (TTM)6.21
EPS (TTM)2.71
Earnings DateNov 27, 2019 - Dec 2, 2019
Forward Dividend & Yield0.64 (3.76%)
Ex-Dividend Date2019-09-10
1y Target Est19.27
Trade prices are not sourced from all markets
  • Mark Hurd, Oracle CEO Who Led Three Tech Companies, Dies
    Bloomberg

    Mark Hurd, Oracle CEO Who Led Three Tech Companies, Dies

    (Bloomberg) -- Mark Hurd, who was chief executive officer of three major technology companies including Oracle Corp., has died. He was 62.Most recently Hurd was co-CEO at Oracle with Safra Catz where he focused on sales, marketing and press and investor relations, while she ran finances and legal matters. Oracle announced on Sept. 11 that Hurd had begun a leave of absence for unspecified health-related reasons and that Catz and Oracle Chairman Larry Ellison would assume his responsibilities during his leave. The company didn’t disclose a cause of death Friday.“It is with a profound sense of sadness and loss that I tell everyone here at Oracle that Mark Hurd passed away early this morning,” Ellison wrote in an online post. “Mark was my close and irreplaceable friend, and trusted colleague. Oracle has lost a brilliant and beloved leader who personally touched the lives of so many of us during his decade at Oracle.”Hurd began his career in 1980 as a salesman for National Cash Register Corp. (now NCR), before rising in the ranks to the CEO post. In 2005, he was hired away as CEO by Hewlett-Packard Co., then the world’s biggest personal-computer maker. Hurd joined Oracle as a co-president in 2010, after resigning from HP following a sexual-harassment probe. While an internal investigation didn’t find a violation of the company’s sexual-harassment policy, it concluded that he violated company standards by filing inaccurate expense reports to conceal a personal relationship with a contractor.During his Oracle tenure, Hurd produced solid revenue and profits as the Redwood City, California-based company’s stock price hit a historic high in 2019. He was also a key driver in Oracle’s turn from an old model of licensing software toward the use of cloud computing, a burgeoning business dominated by rivals Amazon.com Inc. and Microsoft Corp.When he hired Hurd, Ellison said, “There is no executive in the IT world with more relevant experience than Mark.” Ellison described Hurd’s dismissal by HP as the “worst personnel decision since the idiots on the Apple board fired Steve Jobs.”Transformed SalesforceHurd reshaped Oracle’s salesforce. Beginning in 2013, he implemented a “specialist” model that made each member an expert in a single product category. In that year alone, he hired more than 4,000 people to implement his idea.He also created the “Class of” program that was designed to inject a startup feel into Oracle. College graduates were hired for a dedicated program that prepared them to become Oracle’s future sales leaders.In 2014, Hurd and Catz were named co-CEOs, while Ellison continued to serve as chairman of the board, orchestrate management changes and develop products as chief technology officer.Hurd was regarded as the most media-friendly of the trio, frequently serving as the public face of the company to outline its goals. At the time Hurd and Catz were named CEOs, Oracle’s central business was selling software designed to run on gear owned by the customer and charging a license fee. Hurd was among those inside Oracle who saw the company’s future in cloud computing -- which would let customers rent software and run their data on servers owned by vendors such as Oracle. He predicted in 2015 that by 2025 all enterprise data would be stored in the cloud and that 100% of software development and testing would run through it.Today, the company is much less ambitious in its cloud efforts, and has been making smaller promises. In June, Oracle said it would partner with Microsoft, a decades-long rival, to connect the two companies’ cloud services, so customers can use Oracle databases or applications tied to Microsoft’s Azure cloud. While Catz said Microsoft, the world’s largest software maker, wanted an alliance to give clients access to Oracle’s AI-driven databases, the move was a concession—signaling Oracle knew it could no longer go at it alone.It’s now Catz who will have to go it alone, at least for now. Some analysts expect the company will move to appoint a new partner soon. “It’s much more manageable to have two CEOs, so we would be surprised if Oracle goes back to one CEO going forward,” said John Barrett, an analyst at Morningstar Investment Service. “The larger question is how Oracle will go about searching for the co-CEO role and how quickly they can find a successor.”The succession will likely come from within the company’s deep bench. One option is Jeff Henley, Oracle’s vice chairman and former chief financial officer, according to Abby Adlerman, CEO of Boardspan, which provides software and services to address board governance. “I think from a succession planning perspective, they are in a much better place than most companies. They have a lot of options.” Ellison will likely stay close and in the long term, “it’s a matter of if Safra wants to go at it alone. It’s such a big company that there was a reason for the co-CEO role.”Ellison has mentioned Don Johnson, head of Oracle’s cloud infrastructure division, and Steve Miranda, head of Oracle’s applications unit, as possible partners to Catz in the future.Growth StrategyHurd led the charge to make Oracle one of the dominant cloud players, investing heavily in research and development and acquisitions, such as the $9.3 billion purchase of NetSuite Inc., sometimes called the first cloud company, in 2016. Oracle also bought Eloqua Inc., a marketing software company, and Taleo Corp., which makes talent-management.He secured significant deals with AT&T Inc., Bank of America Corp., and Qantas Airlines to transfer their existing databases to the cloud through Oracle. By late 2019, Oracle served more than 420,000 customers in 195 countries and territories, he said.Hurd had gone on a similar acquisition binge at HP, managing about $24 billion in deals, including buying Electronic Data Systems (EDS), as part of a larger plan to diversify the computer maker.He was also a drastic cost cutter who was responsible for firing thousands of workers when he first took over as HP’s CEO and laying off thousands more after the $13.9 billion purchase in 2008 of a struggling EDS, a move many investors disliked.Still, under Hurd’s tenure, HP increased profits for 22 straight quarters, while its revenue rose about 60% and its stock price doubled, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. He also helped HP surpass International Business Machines Corp. as the largest computer maker by sales.There were some dark moments at HP too. In 2006, it was disclosed that Hurd had helped launch an investigation into internal leaks from the company’s board. Outside security consultants conducted surveillance on a journalist and HP board member, and used a subterfuge to acquire phone and fax records for HP employees, board members and journalists. The California attorney general’s office opened a criminal probe into possible privacy violations, and HP’s chairwoman at the time, Patricia Dunn, resigned her post when the scandal broke.For his part, Hurd defended the need to investigate company leakers, but claimed he didn’t know about the investigators’ tawdry tactics because he’d ducked out of a briefing on the investigation and, several months later, ignored a verbal and written summary of the leak probe.After Hurd was ousted following the sexual harassment probe in 2010, HP discontinued making smartphones and its tablet computer. Eventually it split into two companies, one focused on personal computers and printers and the other on software and services.Top CEODespite navigating several scandals, Hurd was lauded by the industry. In 2007, he was named one of Fortune magazine’s 25 most powerful business leaders. In 2008, the San Francisco Chronicle named Hurd CEO of the Year.“Saddened by the loss of Mark Hurd,” wrote Bill McDermott, who stepped down as CEO of SAP SE this month, on Twitter. “He was a self-made success in the industry & presided over mega accomplishments. While we competed vigorously in the market, we enjoyed professional respect. My heartfelt prayers are with Mark’s family on this solemn day.”Mark Vincent Hurd was born on Jan. 1, 1957, in New York and lived on the affluent Upper East Side of Manhattan. His Yale-educated father was a financier who moved the family to Miami while Hurd was in high school. His mother was a debutante.Hurd received a tennis scholarship to Baylor University in Waco, Texas, where he earned a bachelor’s degree in business administration in 1979.He was hired in 1980 as a junior sales person by National Cash Register in San Antonio. He eventually became president, chief operating officer and CEO of the maker of automatic teller machines and cash registers.Based on his NCR record, HP hired him in 2005 as its CEO and added the chairman title the following year.“Mark just blew everybody else out of the water,” said Tom Perkins, a former HP executive who interviewed Hurd for the CEO job.Hurd served on a number of corporate boards and was a Baylor University trustee since 2014.He was married to the former Paula Kalupa in 1990. They had two daughters, Kathryn and Kelly.(Updates with comments from analyst in 12th paragraph)\--With assistance from Nico Grant, Peter Waldman and Candy Cheng.To contact the reporter on this story: Patrick Oster in New York at poster@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Jillian Ward at jward56@bloomberg.net, Andrew Pollack, Molly SchuetzFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Benzinga

    Oracle Co-CEO Mark Hurd Dies At 62

    Mark Hurd, co-CEO of O racle Corporation (NYSE: ORCL ) and former head of HP Inc (NYSE: HPQ ), died Friday after a month-long leave of absence for health reasons. “Oracle has lost a brilliant and beloved ...

  • Mark Hurd: Silicon Valley’s Ultimate Salesman
    Bloomberg

    Mark Hurd: Silicon Valley’s Ultimate Salesman

    (Bloomberg) -- Mark Hurd was in his element at Indian Wells.The tennis tournament–more formally known as the BNP Paribas Open at Indian Wells, California— provided him with the perfect backdrop to flex his passions: tennis and selling stuff. Hurd turned the event, which Oracle Corp. co-founder Larry Ellison bought in 2009, into a two-week database and software sales extravaganza. He could be seen strolling the grounds or at nearby hotels constantly schmoozing with customers and using his connections with tennis legends like Chris Evert and Rafael Nadal to win people over and help close a deal. Along the way, Hurd, Oracle’s co-CEO, would sneak in a hit–he had a big serve and liked to flaunt it–or check on the American college players he was mentoring and the young pros he was quietly helping with financial aid. For Hurd, business and pleasure were one and the same and almost always intermixed in his life.This is what I’ll remember most about Hurd, who passed away Friday morning after a protracted illness: he was a relentless hustler and loved the art of doing business more than just about any other executive I’ve ever run across. In a statement issued after Hurd’s death, Ellison pointed to his friend’s business acumen. “Oracle has lost a brilliant and beloved leader who personally touched the lives of so many of us during his decade at Oracle,” Ellison said. “All of us will miss Mark’s keen mind and rare ability to analyze, simplify and solve problems quickly.” Hurd arrived at Oracle in 2010 under tumultuous conditions. He’d resigned as CEO of Hewlett-Packard after being investigated by the company’s board for a relationship Hurd had with a marketing contractor. The board argued that Hurd had tried to cover up the relationship and misused his expense account, and Hurd argued that they were wrong and making much ado about nothing. The squabble was acrimonious enough to end Hurd’s time at HP, even though he had revived the company’s fortunes and turned it into a lean, mean maker of corporate technology products, printers and personal computers.At Oracle, Hurd applied his trademark skills at analyzing balance sheets and streamlining operations to try and improve the software maker’s bottom line. He could recite from memory the financial minutiae of every division and be blunt about what was working and what needed to be fixed. During his years at Oracle, the company’s share price more than doubled, and Hurd was a constant presence at the company’s events, sales meetings and customer sites. In many ways, he became the public face of Oracle, enjoying the limelight while Ellison made the occasional appearance and co-CEO Safra Catz preferred to operate in the background.Though Oracle remains the dominant database company, it still has much work to do to catch up in the booming market for cloud-based software and services. Oracle was late to the game modernizing its products. Hurd tried his best to paper over Oracle’s weaknesses through salesmanship and often succeeded. One of the biggest weaknesses throughout his career, though, was favoring bottom line performance over investing in research and development and revolutionary new products. Hurd often seemed to focus on the here and now, rather than plotting for what lay ahead. Oracle’s dual-CEO structure was unusual and not always to Hurd’s liking, as he reveled in controlling a business and overseeing all of its operations. He took on sales, marketing and press and investor relations, and Catz handled finances and legal. Last month Oracle said that Hurd was taking a leave of absence for an unspecified illness and that Ellison and Catz would assume his responsibilities. Ellison has said that Catz will stay in place and that he would like to keep the two-CEO structure. He cited Don Johnson, head of Oracle’s cloud infrastructure division, and Steve Miranda, head of Oracle’s applications unit, as possible partners to Catz in the future.What’s clear is that Hurd will not be easy to replace. On a personal note, he shared a tight bond with Ellison around tennis. The two men have been pumping money into American tournaments and players for years, hoping to spark a revival of U.S. male pros. And, when Hurd was at his lowest moment after the HP fiasco, it was Ellison who came to the rescue, championing Hurd in the press and offering him a high-profile gig at Oracle. These actions–along with massive annual pay packages-made Hurd very loyal to Ellison and left Hurd as eager as ever to prove Ellison right and his critics wrong.Not short on ego, Hurd saw business as a battlefield and perceived himself as a master general. On his worst days, he was short of temper and combative. But, on his best days–of which there seemed to be many–he was a numbers and strategy savant with a rare ability to inspire those under him to work incredibly hard. Hurd himself was a workaholic and considered Oracle’s performance as a reflection on his character. Very few people are as committed to their work or as passionate in their pursuit of it.Vance covered Hurd for 15 years in his roles as CEO of NCR, HP and Oracle and even played tennis with him once. To contact the author of this story: Ashlee Vance in Palo Alto at avance3@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Molly Schuetz at mschuetz9@bloomberg.net, Robin AjelloFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Financial Times

    Essay competition winner: challenge the voice in your head that says ‘I’m not ready’

    With people like me falling foul of unconscious bias, we clearly have some way to go before we can take gender parity for granted. Many studies show that women are more likely to lack confidence, resulting in fewer applying for jobs or promotions — as described in an oft-cited internal report at Hewlett-Packard. Women also settle for lower pay when compared with similarly qualified male counterparts — as shown by Linda Babcock and Sara Laschever in their book Women Don’t Ask.

  • 6 Cheap Stocks Boosting Earnings
    GuruFocus.com

    6 Cheap Stocks Boosting Earnings

    Rising EPS for Fiat Chrysler Continue reading...

  • TheStreet.com

    [video]Microsoft, Intel and Others Benefit from Better-Than-Expected Business PC Sales

    Though CPU shortages are still an issue for the PC industry, an uptick in business PC demand is helping out a number of firms.

  • Hedge Funds Have Never Been Less Bullish On HP Inc. (HPQ)
    Insider Monkey

    Hedge Funds Have Never Been Less Bullish On HP Inc. (HPQ)

    We at Insider Monkey have gone over 730 13F filings that hedge funds and prominent investors are required to file by the SEC The 13F filings show the funds' and investors' portfolio positions as of June 28th. In this article, we look at what those funds think of HP Inc. (NYSE:HPQ) based on that data. […]

  • PC Shipment Rises in Q3: LNVGY, HPQ, DELL & AAPL in Focus
    Zacks

    PC Shipment Rises in Q3: LNVGY, HPQ, DELL & AAPL in Focus

    Per Gartner and IDC, PC shipment volumes in third-quarter 2019 expand owing to the Windows 10 refresh cycle.

  • GlobeNewswire

    HP Inc. and Girl Rising Mark International Day of the Girl with Partnership to Empower 10 Million Students and Teachers

    Delivers educational content, technology, multimedia assets, activities and lesson plans to students and teachers. Builds on HP’s global commitment to enable better learning outcomes for 100 million people by 2025. Expands existing partnership with Girl Rising with the joint mission to change the way the world thinks about girls and education.

  • Barrons.com

    HP Inc. Stock Suffers Another Blow After a Goldman Downgrade

    The future is looking bleak for the storied tech company, whose shares have lost almost 22% this year.

  • Financial Times

    Deloitte was too close to Autonomy, regulators claim

    Deloitte auditors had a “oneness” with Autonomy executives including founder Mike Lynch that led to a misleading picture of the technology group’s financial position, regulators have claimed. The Financial Reporting Council said Richard Knights, the former Deloitte partner in charge of auditing Autonomy, “consciously lost his objectivity” during a five-year relationship with the FTSE 100 company, and was “reckless” and “seriously misleading” in reports to regulators. The FRC’s comments came on the first day of an eight-week tribunal on Thursday in which it is bringing disciplinary proceedings against Deloitte, Mr Knights and ex-partner Nigel Mercer over alleged misconduct in their audits of Autonomy between 2009 and 2011.

  • HP Stock Slides as Goldman Sachs Turns Bearish
    Market Realist

    HP Stock Slides as Goldman Sachs Turns Bearish

    HP stock dropped around 2% on Thursday after Goldman Sachs turned bearish on it. Among the 17 analysts covering HP, only one analyst gave it a “buy” rating.

  • Global PC shipments grow for second straight quarter amid tariff, supply issues
    MarketWatch

    Global PC shipments grow for second straight quarter amid tariff, supply issues

    Global PC shipments grow for a second quarter in a row, even as the industry struggled with supply issues, according to trade research data Thursday.

  • Bloomberg

    Global PC Shipments Climb 1.1%; Lenovo Keeps Grip on Top Spot

    (Bloomberg) -- Worldwide shipments of personal computers increased 1.1% in the third quarter from a year earlier, fueled by companies upgrading to Microsoft Corp.’s latest Windows software.PC shipments climbed to 68 million units in the period that ended Sept. 30, researcher Gartner Inc. said Thursday in a report. Lenovo Group Ltd., the China-based owner of the ThinkPad lineup of professional devices, held almost 25% of the global market, widening its lead against U.S. rival HP Inc.Computer makers have been concerned by the U.S.-China trade war and Intel Corp.’s chip shortage, but Mikako Kitagawa, a Gartner analyst, said neither played a major role in the third-quarter shipments. “The Windows 10 refresh cycle continued to be the primary driver for growth across all regions,” she said in a statement.HP, the global No. 2, continues to be the largest PC vendor in the U.S. The company has sought customers seeking more expensive machines, such as gaming enthusiasts, to boost profit margins. Dell Technologies Inc., which focuses on selling corporate PCs, rounded out the global top three while Apple Inc. held the fourth spot with 7.5% of the worldwide market.To contact the reporter on this story: Nico Grant in San Francisco at ngrant20@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Jillian Ward at jward56@bloomberg.net, Andrew Pollack, Molly SchuetzFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Cisco, HP, NetApp are vulnerable to a ‘deterioration’ in enterprise spending, Goldman warns
    MarketWatch

    Cisco, HP, NetApp are vulnerable to a ‘deterioration’ in enterprise spending, Goldman warns

    Enterprise spending will continue to “deteriorate,” according to Goldman Sachs, and that could pose problems for several large tech stocks.

  • MarketWatch

    HP stock falls after Goldman Sachs turns bearish

    Goldman Sachs analyst Rod Hall downgraded shares of HP Inc. to sell from neutral on Thursday, writing that he expects a "substantially tougher environment" ahead next year as the company sees PC tailwinds reverse and tries to change up its printing strategy to combat a rise in counterfeit supplies. Shares are off 2.4% in premarket trading Thursday. "While consumer PCs have been weak, this has been masked by strength in commercial PCs driven in part by the Windows 10 migration cycle which we expect to fade in 2020, particularly in [the second half]," Hall wrote. "Further, we see significant risk to printing profits as the supplies business continues to deteriorate." He lowered his price target to $14 from $18. The stock has lost 20% over the past three months, while the S&P 500 has risen 2.5%. Hall also turned bearish on NetApp Inc.'s stock Thursday and downgraded Cisco shares to neutral from buy.

  • TheStreet.com

    HP Shares Extend Declines After Goldman Analysts Lower Rating, Price Target

    HP shares traded lower Thursday after analysts at Goldman Sachs lowered their rating on the stock, and cut their price target, citing a "substantially tougher" business environment in 2020.

  • HPI Federal inks $1.4B Navy contract for computers, hardware
    American City Business Journals

    HPI Federal inks $1.4B Navy contract for computers, hardware

    The technology contract will provide computers and hardware to the Navy and Marine Corps, either through outright acquisitions or by leasing them as a service.

  • Two Gadget Makers Look to Move Manufacturing Out of China, Citing Trade War
    Bloomberg

    Two Gadget Makers Look to Move Manufacturing Out of China, Citing Trade War

    (Bloomberg) -- Terms of Trade is a daily newsletter that untangles a world embroiled in trade wars. Sign up here. Two American consumer electronics companies said this week that they’re looking to shift manufacturing away from China and into other countries, citing pressures from import tariffs on their products amid the trade war.Fitbit Inc. said on Wednesday that it would stop Chinese manufacturing of its health trackers and smartwatches by January. Tile Inc. said it’s also considering plans to make its Bluetooth-enabled location trackers in other countries, after the company was hit with tariffs last month.“The biggest challenge for a company like Tile is our ability to plan for shifting changes in U.S. policy toward China,” said Chief Executive Officer CJ Prober. “With recent impacts, we are looking at other regions.”Tile on Tuesday added a new sticker to its lineup of tracking devices that help customers keep tabs on keys, wallets and the like, and raised $45 million in funding in its last round of funding earlier this year. The gadget maker does the majority of its manufacturing in China, but as the U.S.-China trade war has escalated, it’s now considering Mexico, Malaysia, Vietnam and “possibly the U.S.” as future manufacturing hubs, Prober said.“We are re-evaluating our entire supply chain and how we do what and where,” he said, adding that in recent weeks, Tile had dedicated an “entire team” to the task of traveling to different cities and evaluating manufacturing facilities. In a sign of concern from investors about the potential costs of relocating these operations, shares of San Francisco-based Fitbit fell as much as 2% Wednesday after announcing the move from China.Several U.S. companies, long accustomed to using China as a manufacturing base, are now looking to reduce their exposure to the country. Last year, GoPro Inc. announced it would move much of its U.S.-bound camera production out of China to avoid potential tariffs, and has largely accomplished that goal, according to a spokesman. In August, HP Inc.’s laptop maker Inventec Corp. said it will shift production of notebooks for the U.S. market away from China. Apple Inc. has been doing battle with the White House over requests to get the iPhone and other products off the list of Chinese-made goods slated to be hit with tariffs on Dec. 15.The latest $300 billion round of duties will impact essentially all remaining Chinese imports—with some exceptions, though details around which imports will be exempted are still unclear. Trade policy between the world’s two largest economies is still in flux. Chinese Vice Premier Liu He is set to visit the U.S. this week for further trade talks.“We are supportive of the overall policy” of the U.S. in its negotiations with China, Tile’s Prober said. But “what’s been challenging is the implementation of that policy.” The company “only got a few weeks’ notice” that its products would be subject to new tariffs before they went into effect in September, he said. (Updates with Fitbit news in the second paragraph.)To contact the author of this story: Candy Cheng in San Francisco at ccheng86@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Anne VanderMey at avandermey@bloomberg.net, Mark MilianFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Stratasys Unveils Medical 3D Printer, Boosts Market Foothold
    Zacks

    Stratasys Unveils Medical 3D Printer, Boosts Market Foothold

    Stratasys' (SSYS) new 3D printer is especially beneficial for medical device companies, which require new ways to drive faster adoption of technologies and procedures.

  • Benzinga

    AMD Unveils Budget Radeon Graphics Cards Aimed At Nvidia's Entry-Level Products

    Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. (NASDAQ: AMD ) announced a new lineup of graphics cards Monday: the RX 5500 series graphics products using the RDNA gaming architecture to deliver high-performance, high-fidelity ...

  • Company News For Oct 7, 2019
    Zacks

    Company News For Oct 7, 2019

    Companies in the news are: COST, BP, HPQ and SRPT

  • With yet another restructuring, HP wakes up to the realities of its struggling cash cow
    MarketWatch

    With yet another restructuring, HP wakes up to the realities of its struggling cash cow

    HP Inc. is embarking on yet another massive restructuring, with plans to lay off 7,000 to 9,000 employees over the next three years, as its biggest profit generator, printing, continues to reel from soft demand pressures and cheaper copycat printing supplies.

  • HP to slash 7,000 to 9,000 jobs over three years as part of major restructuring
    MarketWatch

    HP to slash 7,000 to 9,000 jobs over three years as part of major restructuring

    HP Inc. on Thursday announced a major restructuring that will eliminate 7,000 to 9,000 jobs over the next three years as part of a series of moves to transform the computing giant into a software and services powerhouse.

  • GlobeNewswire

    HP Expands Healthcare Edition Portfolio to Address Global Industry Challenges

    News highlights: Sanitizable keyboards and touch-enabled control panels through nitrile, latex and surgical gloves help prevent the spread of infection1Certified printers.