IAG.L - International Consolidated Airlines Group, S.A.

LSE - LSE Delayed Price. Currency in GBp
441.70
+0.10 (+0.02%)
As of 9:49AM BST. Market open.
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Previous Close441.60
Open441.50
Bid441.80 x 0
Ask442.10 x 0
Day's Range434.68 - 443.70
52 Week Range411.50 - 697.20
Volume919,868
Avg. Volume9,318,656
Market Cap8.765B
Beta (3Y Monthly)0.88
PE Ratio (TTM)2.76
EPS (TTM)N/A
Earnings DateN/A
Forward Dividend & Yield0.30 (6.47%)
Ex-Dividend Date2019-07-04
1y Target EstN/A
  • Financial Times

    Strike’s impact on British Airways is incalculable

    Throughout my business life, I was taught that customers are the foundation of a successful business and must be cared for accordingly. Whatever the rights and wrongs of the British Airways pilots’ strike, ...

  • Financial Times

    British Airways has no easy route out of pilot pay dispute

    Known for his 1,000 yard stare, Willie Walsh, chief executive of British Airways’ owner, IAG, is no stranger to bitter industrial clashes. He has faced down unions at Aer Lingus, BA and Spain’s Iberia ...

  • Reuters

    UPDATE 1-Climate-change activists' plan to disrupt Heathrow with drones frustrated

    Climate-change activists who planned to disrupt Heathrow airport with drones were frustrated early on Friday as the devices failed to fly and Europe's biggest airport continued to operate as usual. The Heathrow Pause group aims to ground flights by illegally flying drones within 5 km of an airport, to put pressure on the government to take tougher steps to reduce carbon emissions. "There's no disruption," a spokeswoman for Heathrow Airport said.

  • Financial Times

    British Airways risks doing permanent damage to its reputation

    “We’ve been trying to reach you,” claims the email from British Airways. Maybe they sent a carrier pigeon. I’ve received several of these messages in the past year, when the airline has wanted to make ...

  • British Airways cancels flights on September 27 due to strike
    Reuters

    British Airways cancels flights on September 27 due to strike

    "We are now contacting all those affected to offer them a full refund or a rebooking on an alternative date, destination or airline," British Airways said in an emailed statement. The airline, owned by International Airlines Group (IAG) , was forced this week to cancel 1,700 flights to and from London's Heathrow and Gatwick airports during two days of strike action by pilots over pay. The pilots' union, the British Airline Pilots Association (BALPA), wants a pay deal to include profit sharing for BA pilots.

  • Reuters

    British Airways cancels flights on Sept. 27 due to strike

    British Airways said on Thursday it is cancelling some flights scheduled for Sept. 27 when its pilots are due to hold another strike. "We are now contacting all those affected to offer them a full refund or a rebooking on an alternative date, destination or airline," British Airways said in an emailed statement. The airline, owned by International Airlines Group (IAG) , was forced this week to cancel 1,700 flights to and from London's Heathrow and Gatwick airports during two days of strike action by pilots over pay.

  • Reuters

    UPDATE 2-Protesters vow to go ahead with Heathrow disruption despite arrests

    Climate-change activists have vowed to go ahead with plans to disrupt Heathrow with drones on Friday morning, despite the arrest of five of their members in a pre-emptive strike by London police. "Our policing plan is aimed at preventing criminal activity which poses a significant safety and security risk to the airport, and the thousands of passengers that will be using it," said London police Deputy Assistant Commissioner Laurence Taylor. The five people detained, who have not been named, have been taken to a London police station.

  • Reuters

    Climate activists ready to risk arrest but not passengers' lives in Heathrow protest

    Climate activists planning to disrupt London's Heathrow airport with toy drones said as they practised on Thursday that they would not fly them when planes were in the air and were prepared to be arrested. Last month, British climate activists said they aimed to ground flights at Europe's biggest airport from Friday and put pressure on the government to take tougher steps to reduce carbon emissions. Heathrow has said it will work to operate as usual while protesters from the Heathrow Pause campaign group illegally fly the drones within a 5 km radius of the airport.

  • Financial Times

    British Airways cancels flights ahead of September 27 strike

    British Airways customers are set to face further disruption after the airline confirmed it would cancel the vast majority of flights on September 27 because of a planned pilots strike. BA said it would be emailing affected customers on Thursday afternoon and that resources at call centres had been tripled to help deal with passengers looking to rebook. Britain’s flagship carrier was forced to cancel almost all of its 1,700 flights over the two days, hitting 195,000 customers.

  • Financial Times

    How does British Airways compare with rivals on pilot pay?

    Pilots who are striking at British Airways are better paid than peers at their budget rivals but appear to be less well remunerated than their main European competitors, according to a Financial Times analysis. A starting basic salary for a BA captain is about £75,000, according to Balpa, the pilots’ union. BA said the average salary for a captain was £167,000, with £16,000 of flight allowances on top of this.

  • Benzinga

    Rivals, Shareholders Make Bids For Bankrupt Aigle Azur

    Bankrupt French airline Aigle Azur, which operated scheduled service to domestic and tourist destinations within France, Portugal and North Africa, has attracted more than a dozen bids from shareholders ...

  • Reuters

    UK police confident Heathrow climate protest will not bring chaos

    British police said they were confident an attempt by climate change activists to disrupt London's Heathrow airport with toy drones from Friday would not lead to a repeat of the chaos seen at Gatwick last December. Drone sightings at Gatwick, Britain's second-busiest airport, led to about 1,000 flight cancellations and disrupted the travel plans of 140,000 passengers in the run-up to Christmas. The Heathrow Pause group plans to fly toy drones from 0200 GMT on Friday within a 5 km restricted zone around the airport but outside the flight paths of the airport, a step the group said would force the airport to ground flights.

  • Financial Times

    Virgin in fresh calls for shake-up of Heathrow aircraft slots

    Virgin Atlantic has stepped up calls on the government to reform the way take-off and landing slots are allocated at an expanded Heathrow, with a report highlighting the lack of competition on some routes out of the UK’s biggest airport. The report estimates that IAG operated 77 monopoly routes out of Heathrow this summer. IAG is Heathrow’s biggest customer, operating over half of all take-off and landing slots.

  • Financial Times

    Best of Lex Midweek: Break out from La-la-don

    On Tuesday it began a break called prorogation, until October 14, forced upon it by Prime Minister Boris Johnson. MPs, however, had hardly packed for their constituencies — or other destinations — before judges in Scotland’s highest court ruled on Wednesday that the prorogation was unlawful. It will be up to the UK Supreme Court to decide just how long MPs will end up on holiday.

  • Boeing Falls Further Behind Rival Airbus In Key Race As 737 Max Grounding Drags On
    Investor's Business Daily

    Boeing Falls Further Behind Rival Airbus In Key Race As 737 Max Grounding Drags On

    Boeing reported another weak month of orders and deliveries amid the global 737 Max grounding, drifting further behind its archrival in deliveries this year

  • Reuters

    Heathrow airport says it aims to stay open during drone disruption

    Britain's Heathrow Airport said it will work to ensure it stays open and can operate safely during planned drone disruption by climate activists due to start on Friday. A group calling itself Heathrow Pause has said it plans to disrupt the airport with toy drones from Sept. 13, a step they hope will ground flights and put pressure on the government to take tougher steps to reduce carbon emissions.

  • Financial Times

    British Airways warns strike expected to ground more flights

    British Airways warned customers would face more disruption on Wednesday, with about 100 flights likely to be cancelled as it attempted to recover from the first pilots’ strike in the airline’s history.

  • Financial Times

    Pilots’ strike points to deeper British Airways malaise

    “Greed of BA pilots wrecking holidays” was the front-page headline in the Daily Mail on Friday. First, British Airways pilots are not natural troublemakers. Second, the outcome of the pilots’ strike ballot in July was arresting.

  • Benzinga

    Minimal Cargo Impact Expected From British Airways Strike

    =Shippers will likely experience little operational impact from the strike by British Airways pilots on Monday and Tuesday, air cargo analysts and service providers said. Members of the British Airline Pilots Association (BALPA) voted in July to walk off the job if talks for a new labor deal faltered, giving freight agents plenty of time to find alternative transport with other airlines. Only trans-continental airfreight already en route and requiring a transfer at the London hub at Heathrow International Airport, might be trapped in British Airways' system.

  • Benzinga

    China's Sinoair Adds Online Service With Freightos WebCargo

    China's largest freight forwarder, Sinotrans, will offer online quoting and booking for air freight via WebCargo , the logistics purchasing platform from Freightos. Freightos said that Sinotrans' air freight ...

  • Bloomberg

    More Than a Whiff of 1970s Gloom in Brexit-Hobbled Britain

    (Bloomberg) -- Follow @Brexit, sign up to our Brexit Bulletin, and tell us your Brexit story. The pound is sinking, the government is in open conflict with Parliament, British Airways is on strike and there’s talk of nationalizing major industries.Garbage isn’t piling up in streets across the U.K. But in some respects, events resemble the dark days of the 1970s, when the country was forced to borrow from the International Monetary Fund -- recourse usually associated with developing nations.The pound has been pressured by Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s pledge to take Britain out of the European Union on Halloween, with or without a deal and in the face of a legal challenge from Parliament. The currency has plunged 17% since the vote to leave the EU in mid-2016.The IMF crisis of 1976 was triggered when spending legislation proposed by Prime Minister James Callaghan’s Labour government was defeated in Parliament. It was followed by the so-called Winter of Discontent of 1978-79, when public-sector unions halted work ranging from hospital admissions to garbage collection to grave-digging.The unrest helped Margaret Thatcher to win the 1979 election.Worse Now?“In many ways it’s much worse now,” said Steven Fielding, a professor of contemporary British political history at the University of Nottingham. “The Winter of Discontent was a temporary thing that was relatively easily resolved.”He added that “Britain is much more divided now that it was. It is a more extensive and deeper intractable crisis.”British Airways grounded most of its flights Monday for the next two days as pilots went on strike for the first time since 1979. While coordinated industrial action is a thing of the past, not least because Thatcher partly defanged the unions, the echo is chilling.Brexit has divided British politics and society -- even families -- like no other recent issue. The fissure reached a symbolic apogee Friday, when Johnson’s brother Jo quit as member of his government and of Parliament.As Johnson’s government sows dissent, opposition leader Jeremy Corbyn is trying to sell a package of pledges that would make a Labour government one of the most socialist the country has seen. Among the party’s proposals is re-nationalizing some of the industries Thatcher sold to private owners, raising taxes and curbing bank bonuses.For all that, the economy continues to defy predictions of a recession. Official figures Monday showed that gross domestic product expanded in July at the fastest pace in six months, though it was flat on a quarterly view.It’s cold comfort. Bloomberg Economics’ Jamie Rush says that while Britain may have skirted a technical recession, the bigger risk is a slump later this year, with a no-deal Brexit coming on top of weak underlying momentum.\--With assistance from Christopher Jasper.To contact the reporters on this story: Heather Harris in London at hharris5@bloomberg.net;Paul Sillitoe in London at psillitoe@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Flavia Krause-Jackson at fjackson@bloomberg.net, Caroline AlexanderFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • British Airways cancels nearly all flights over pilot strike
    CBS News Videos

    British Airways cancels nearly all flights over pilot strike

    British Airways said Monday that it had been forced to cancel almost all flights as a result of a pilots' 48-hour strike over pay. In a statement Monday, the airline said it had "no way of predicting how many (pilots) would come to work or which aircraft they are qualified to fly." CBS News' Tina Kraus reports.

  • News on the move: Taliban tensions rise after Trump cancels peace meetings, British Airways cancels flights after airline strike
    Yahoo Finance Video

    News on the move: Taliban tensions rise after Trump cancels peace meetings, British Airways cancels flights after airline strike

    News on the move: Taliban tensions rise after Trump cancels peace meetings, British Airways cancels flights after airline strike, City of San Francisco offers to buy PG&E for $2.5 billion, and "It: Chapter Two" earns $91 million domestically, and $185 million world-wide.