IAG.MC - International Consolidated Airlines Group, S.A.

MCE - MCE Delayed Price. Currency in EUR
5.13
-0.04 (-0.77%)
At close: 5:35PM CEST
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Previous Close5.17
Open5.17
Bid5.12 x 0
Ask5.13 x 0
Day's Range5.08 - 5.20
52 Week Range4.85 - 8.07
Volume2,128,704
Avg. Volume3,895,573
Market Cap10.219B
Beta (3Y Monthly)0.60
PE Ratio (TTM)4.88
EPS (TTM)1.05
Earnings DateN/A
Forward Dividend & Yield0.33 (6.38%)
Ex-Dividend Date2019-07-04
1y Target Est8.08
  • Benzinga2 days ago

    Commentary: Boeing's Issues May Be Multiplying

    To an outsider, it appears that Boeing is having trouble in its Commercial Airplanes division limiting the bad news to just one aircraft type, the 737-MAX. There is no need here to recount the two crashes, the aircraft's global grounding and a raft of articles of all the things that Boeing allegedly did wrong during the design and certification process. Boeing's (NYSE: BA) 737 MAX planes might not return to service until next year because of software and other issues that still need to be fixed, according to a July 14 article in the Wall Street Journal.

  • Moody's2 days ago

    British Airways Pass Through Trust 2019-1AA -- Moody's rates British Airways' 2019-1 EETC, Class AA at Aa2, Class A at A3

    Moody's Investors Service ("Moody's") has assigned ratings to British Airways, Plc's new Pass Through Certificates (EETCs), Series 2019-1 to be issued by British Airways Pass Through Trust 2019-1AA and British Airways Pass Through Trust 2019-1A, respectively: $542.971 million Class AA at Aa2 with scheduled final payment date of December 15, 2032 and legal final maturity date of June 15, 2034 and approximately $263.908 million Class A at A3, with scheduled final payment date of June 15, 2029 and legal final maturity of December 15, 2030 (together, the "Certificates"). The Baa3 Long-Term Issuer Rating for British Airways and the positive outlook are unaffected by this rating action.

  • Financial Times2 days ago

    Correction: IAG

    IAG, the owner of British Airways, criticised Heathrow airport for planning to accelerate spending on its proposed third runway, not because airlines would probably absorb any extra passenger service charges ...

  • Financial Times5 days ago

    Investors Chronicle: Begbies Traynor, International Consolidated Airlines, Xaar

    For investors concerned by the rising risk of an economic downturn, results for Begbies Traynor show how a bearish view on UK plc can still be profitable. Shares in the insolvency practitioner, already buttressed by May’s strong trading update, climbed higher on news of a 27 per cent rise in adjusted pre-tax profits to £7.1m in the 12 months to April. Potential sellers are more amenable to deals now the insolvency market is heating up, said executive chairman Ric Traynor, who also expects larger resolutions, after a “slightly disappointing” period for cases, where the fee on an individual can pass £1m.

  • Financial Times5 days ago

    Blockbuster GDPR fines proves boost for cyber protection firms

    may be fined a combined £282m for data breaches produced a surge of interest in cyber insurance, cyber security and legal advice this week, as companies rushed to avoid a similar fate. “It’s undoubtedly a statement of intent and will make a lot of corporate UK sit up and take notice,” said Mark Deem, senior partner at the law firm Cooley, about the pair of fine notices from the UK data regulator, the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO).

  • Boeing Eclipsed By Airbus On This Key Score For First Time In 8 Years
    Investor's Business Daily8 days ago

    Boeing Eclipsed By Airbus On This Key Score For First Time In 8 Years

    Airbus easily topped rival Boeing on commercial aircraft deliveries for the first half of the year, as the 737 Max crisis drags on.

  • UK's ICO fines British Airways a record £183M over GDPR breach that leaked data from 500,000 users
    TechCrunch9 days ago

    UK's ICO fines British Airways a record £183M over GDPR breach that leaked data from 500,000 users

    The U.K.'s Information Commissioner is starting off the week with a GDPR bang: This morning, it announced that it has fined British Airways and its parent International Airlines Group (IAG) £183.39 million ($230 million) in connection with a data breach that took place last year that affected a whopping 500,000 customers browsing and booking tickets online. The fine -- 1.5% of BA's total revenues for the year that ended December 31, 2018 -- is the highest-ever that the ICO has leveled at a company over a data breach (previous "record holder" Facebook was fined a mere £500,000 last year by comparison). In a statement to the market, the two leaders of IAG defended the company and said that its own investigations found that no evidence of fraudulent activity was found on accounts linked to the theft (although as you may know, data from breaches may not always be used in the place where it's been stolen).

  • UK regulator to hit British Airways with record fine over 2018 hack
    Engadget9 days ago

    UK regulator to hit British Airways with record fine over 2018 hack

    The UK's data privacy authority has announced it intends to levy its largest ever fine against airline British Airways (BA). The airline will have to pay £183.39 million ($230 million) to the Information Commissioner's Office (ICO) for failing to protect its customers' data.

  • British Airways faces record $230 million fine over data theft
    Reuters9 days ago

    British Airways faces record $230 million fine over data theft

    British Airways-owner IAG is facing a record $230 million fine for the theft of data from 500,000 customers from its website last year under tough new data-protection rules policed by the UK's Information Commissioner's Office (ICO). The ICO proposed a penalty of 183.4 million pounds, or 1.5% of British Airways' 2017 worldwide turnover, for the hack, which it said exposed poor security arrangements at the airline. BA indicated that it planned to appeal against the fine, the product of European data protection rules, called GDPR, that came into force in 2018.

  • Financial Times9 days ago

    Opening Quote: BA faces £183m fine over the theft of customer data

    Pity British Airways (well, almost). Facebook was fined under the old regime, before the EU General Data Protection Regulation came into force last May. Then £500,000 was the maximum penalty the ICO could impose. The airline's chair and chief executive, Alex Cruz, says he is “surprised and disappointed”.

  • Reuters9 days ago

    UPDATE 2-British Airways faces record $230 mln fine over data theft

    British Airways-owner IAG is facing a record $230 million fine for the theft of data from 500,000 customers from its website last year under tough new data-protection rules policed by the UK's Information Commissioner's Office (ICO). The ICO proposed a penalty of 183.4 million pounds, or 1.5% of British Airways' 2017 worldwide turnover, for the hack, which it said exposed poor security arrangements at the airline. BA indicated that it planned to appeal against the fine, the product of European data protection rules, called GDPR, that came into force in 2018.

  • Financial Times9 days ago

    British Airways hit with record £183m fine for data breach

    British Airways will be hit with the biggest ever fine for breaching European data rules after the company’s website and mobile app were hacked last year. from more than 500,000 customers last year and is the first under new laws introduced in May 2018. “We are surprised and disappointed in this initial finding,” said British Airways chairman and chief executive Alex Cruz.

  • Shares in Norwegian Air rise after IAG denies report of another offer
    Reuters12 days ago

    Shares in Norwegian Air rise after IAG denies report of another offer

    OSLO/MADRID (Reuters) - Shares in budget carrier Norwegian Air rose on Friday after British Airways and Iberia owner IAG denied a Spanish media report it was preparing another offer for the airline.

  • IAG Says Uninterested in Norwegian Air After Bid-Plan Report
    Bloomberg12 days ago

    IAG Says Uninterested in Norwegian Air After Bid-Plan Report

    (Bloomberg) -- Want the lowdown on European markets? In your inbox before the open, every day. Sign up here.British Airways owner IAG SA said it has no plans to revive a bid for discount rival Norwegian Air Shuttle ASA following a Spanish report that an offer was likely to be made in the next 15 days.The airline group, which also owns Madrid-based Iberia, intended to make an approach worth about $1.2 billion, according to Okdiario newspaper. That’s based on a share price of 70-85 kroner, almost double Norwegian’s current market value of $652 million. Okdiario said JPMorgan was advising on the deal.“We have said many times in the past few months that we are no longer interested in Norwegian Air,” IAG spokeswoman Laura Goodes said by telephone on Friday. “Nothing has changed.” The stock rose as much 12% despite the denial.IAG, which also owns Ireland’s Aer Lingus and discounters Vueling and Level, attempted to buy Norwegian last year, but abandoned the effort in January. A renewed pursuit would come amid signs it might encounter less resistance from Norwegian’s board, according to Okdiario, which didn’t name sources.Norwegian, which declined to comment, rejected two offers from IAG as undervaluing its business before the London-based company walked away. The discount carrier had become vulnerable amid a cash crunch and mounting losses following one of fastest expansions in European airline history as it sought to extend its low-cost model into long-distance markets.Rights IssueThe Scandinavian company was forced to close routes and sell off aircraft before billionaire John Fredriksen underwrote a 3 billion kroner rights issue in February to shore up its finances, albeit at a steep discount that saw the stock fall 5% on top of a 21% drop when IAG pulled its bid.Bjorn Kjos, Norwegian’s founder and chief executive officer, who turns 73 on July 18, has asked the board to seek a successor, while his long-time ally, chairman Bjorn Kise, retired in May, having been seen as a potential obstacle to any future deal.In an interview at the Paris Air Show on June 18, Kjos told Bloomberg TV that airlines will always be interested in acquiring other airlines, while declining to say whether his own company was in play.Norwegian Air shares traded 4.2% higher at 42.60 kroner as of 9:12 a.m. in Oslo, paring the decline this year to 57%. IAG traded almost unchanged at 458.80 pence and has declined 20%.(Updates with share reaction starting in second paragraph.)To contact the reporters on this story: Sveinung Sleire in Oslo at ssleire1@bloomberg.net;Christopher Jasper in London at cjasper@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Jonas Bergman at jbergman@bloomberg.net, Anthony Palazzo, Tasneem Hanfi BröggerFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • London markets advance on fresh U.S.-China trade optimism
    MarketWatch16 days ago

    London markets advance on fresh U.S.-China trade optimism

    Investors were encouraged by reports Saturday that included the U.S. suspending some sanctions on Huawei

  • European markets buoyed by lifting of Huawei ban, trade talks
    MarketWatch16 days ago

    European markets buoyed by lifting of Huawei ban, trade talks

    EUROPE MARKETS European markets rallied Monday on the perceived lightening of trade skirmishes among the U.S. and China, with tech stocks among the best performers. How did markets perform? The Stoxx 600 (XX:SXXP) rallied to 388.

  • Reuters19 days ago

    NEWSMAKER-From wind tunnels to megadeals, the Boeing sales boss facing new MAX storm

    Days after stealing the Paris Airshow with a deal to sell 200 of the grounded 737 MAX, Boeing's sales chief faces fallout from the discovery of a new flaw that will delay the jet's return to service. Senior vice-president Ihssane Mounir has built a reputation for striking where least expected in the global jet industry, shunning the spotlight. Last week, he and other Boeing executives scored a major coup in winning British Airways owner IAG - a big Airbus short-haul user - over to an initial $24 billion deal for the 737 MAX.

  • Boeing Stock Tests Support As FAA Finds New 737 Max Problem
    Investor's Business Daily19 days ago

    Boeing Stock Tests Support As FAA Finds New 737 Max Problem

    Boeing 737 Max jets' return to service could be delayed after the FAA discovered another problem with its computer system that can cause the jet to dive. Shares fell, testing key support.

  • British Airways will let you track your luggage with RFID tags
    Engadget21 days ago

    British Airways will let you track your luggage with RFID tags

    Checking in your bags will soon be easier than ever. British Airways will be the next major airline to roll out RFID luggage tracking for its passengers. Travelers with a ViewTag can tag their bags before even arriving at the airport. After checking-in with BA's mobile app, you'll be able to sync your flight information to your bag with your smartphone. British Airways passengers can pre-order their RFID luggage tags directly from the airline, which are available at the introductory price of £63 (roughly $80). The reusable bag tags are equipped with Bluetooth Low Energy and an E Ink display that shows your flight information. Each tag is rated for over 3,000 screen changes and doesn't need to be recharged. At present, the tags can only be used on direct flights.

  • Barrons.com21 days ago

    Boeing’s 737 MAX Has Strong Support Among Airlines

    Boeing made a big splash in Paris at the air show with an order for 200 737 MAX jets from British Airways parent International Consolidated Airlines. The aerospace industry appears to be standing behind the still-grounded jet.

  • Factbox: International airlines' response to FAA on Iran airspace
    Reuters25 days ago

    Factbox: International airlines' response to FAA on Iran airspace

    Here are some statements from non-U.S Airlines: * Gulf Air said it was evaluating flight path changes andworking with authorities on contingency plans should thesituation escalate further. * Etihad Airways, which was flying over the area earlier onFriday, said it had agreed "to change a number of the flightpaths we operate to and from the Arabian Gulf" after closeconsultation with the UAE General Civil Aviation Authority. * Cathay Pacific said on Friday its flights will not fly inthe airspace above the Strait of Hormuz and will review areas ofconcern to ensure all flight routes remain safe.

  • British Airways Fined $229 million Over Security Breach
    Meredith Videosyesterday

    British Airways Fined $229 million Over Security Breach

    It lost data for 500,000 customers.

  • Europe remains quiet as Deutsche Bank's price bump fades
    Yahoo Finance Video9 days ago

    Europe remains quiet as Deutsche Bank's price bump fades

    Yahoo Finance's Oscar Williams-Grut reports on Europe's reaction to Deutsche Bank's restructuring efforts.