IDCBY - Industrial and Commercial Bank of China Limited

Other OTC - Other OTC Delayed Price. Currency in USD
12.46
-0.12 (-0.95%)
At close: 3:57PM EDT
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Previous Close12.58
Open12.49
Bid0.00 x 0
Ask0.00 x 0
Day's Range12.45 - 12.52
52 Week Range12.27 - 15.82
Volume106,033
Avg. Volume55,496
Market Cap261.953B
Beta (3Y Monthly)0.85
PE Ratio (TTM)4.98
EPS (TTM)2.50
Earnings DateN/A
Forward Dividend & Yield0.73 (5.80%)
Ex-Dividend Date2019-06-24
1y Target EstN/A
Trade prices are not sourced from all markets
  • Moody's

    Industrial & Comm'l Bank of China (NZ) Ltd -- Moody's announces completion of a periodic review of ratings of Industrial & Comm'l Bank of China (NZ) Ltd

    Moody's Investors Service ("Moody's") has completed a periodic review of the ratings of Industrial & Comm'l Bank of China (NZ) Ltd and other ratings that are associated with the same analytical unit. "IMPORTANT NOTICE: MOODY'S RATINGS AND PUBLICATIONS ARE NOT INTENDED FOR USE BY RETAIL INVESTORS. This publication does not announce a credit rating action and is not an indication of whether or not a credit rating action is likely in the near future.

  • Down the Rabbit Hole With Trump and Xi
    Bloomberg

    Down the Rabbit Hole With Trump and Xi

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- In the fable, the tortoise wins the race because the hare lies down to take a nap after bolting into the lead. Slow, dogged persistence triumphs over flighty arrogance. If this were the story of the U.S.-China trade war, it’s easy to see which would be which.Trade wars are good and easy to win, President Donald Trump famously declared on Twitter in March 2018. Since then, U.S. policy toward China has shifted repeatedly as the president bounced from one position to another, alternately offering taunts and peace overtures. Early this month, Trump ripped into China just as negotiators were about to resume trade talks in Shanghai, then overruled his Treasury secretary to announce extra tariffs in a tweet after the discussions broke down.China has been far more cautious. Even a leader as powerful President Xi Jinping must marvel at the speed with which decisions have been made in Washington. Last week, China let the yuan slide past 7 to the dollar for the first time since 2008.  Within 24 hours, the Treasury Department had formally labeled China a currency manipulator after the president lambasted the yuan’s move – on Twitter, naturally.Caution has its advantages. Decisions are more deliberate, and there’s less chance of getting caught in a trap of your own making, as Bloomberg’s editorial board pointed out last week. Case in point, the dollar strengthened after Trump used the yuan’s slide to renew his call on the Federal Reserve to cut rates. Global investors reacted by fleeing risk for the safety of the greenback.However, too much caution can also be a problem. Look at the way China has managed its domestic economic challenges, and you may be doubtful that this tortoise will ever catch the hare.The government’s approach to tremors among the country’s regional banks provides a telling example. In May, regulators carried out the first bank seizure in two decades. The People’s Bank of China took over Baoshang Bank, a lender based in Inner Mongolia, citing “serious” credit risks. The central bank said that only interbank liabilities of less than 50 million yuan ($7 million) would be fully protected, in an attempt to break perceptions of an implicit government guarantee backing all lenders.That decision sent jitters through the interbank and shadow-lending markets, even though the PBOC ended up guaranteeing practically all of Baoshang’s short-term loans.The heat was too much for Beijing, however justified its handling of the issue may have been (after all, banks should consider credit risk rather than lending to each other on blind trust). Two months later, authorities took a different approach to solve another crisis case: Bank of Jinzhou Co., a regional institution that uses short-term interbank loans to fund shadow credit products.Instead of a full bank seizure, the government turned to the national team, calling in state-owned heavyweights such as Industrial & Commercial Bank of China Ltd. and distressed-debt manager China Cinda Asset Management Co. to broker a rescue. The deal wasn’t cheap, as I’ve written. Investors didn’t take kindly to ICBC, the nation’s biggest lender, being press-ganged in this way. Shares of the “big four” banks sank to record lows after the bailout.Third time’s the charm, or maybe not. Central Huijin Investment Ltd., a unit of China’s sovereign wealth fund and the owner of major stakes in the big four, will buy into Hengfeng Bank Co., a regional lender in the northeast province of Shandong, the 21st Century Business Herald reported Friday. This approach brings the problem on to the central government’s balance sheet – quite a commitment, given that China has more than 4,000 regional banks. The industry has a potential capital shortfall of 2.4 trillion yuan, UBS Group AG’s Jason Bedford estimates.In these three cases, the Chinese bureaucracy has behaved like a timid tortoise. It sticks its head out tentatively to sniff the air and then pulls it back into its shell at the first sign of trouble. A few months later, the tortoise ventures forth once again – with a different face.What’s the moral of this modern tale? The U.S. hare is jumping around in all directions and appears not to know where the finish line is, or how to tell when it’s won. The Chinese tortoise, meanwhile, is moving so slowly that it may never get there. At least Aesop’s fable had a winner. Welcome to the never-ending trade war. To contact the author of this story: Shuli Ren at sren38@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Matthew Brooker at mbrooker1@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Shuli Ren is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering Asian markets. She previously wrote on markets for Barron's, following a career as an investment banker, and is a CFA charterholder.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Leadership shuffle at Bank of Jinzhou raises questions about ICBC-led 'investment' in July, as credit drought wrecks damage on regional lenders
    South China Morning Post

    Leadership shuffle at Bank of Jinzhou raises questions about ICBC-led 'investment' in July, as credit drought wrecks damage on regional lenders

    Bank of Jinzhou has appointed Guo Wenfeng, 47, to take over the post of governor at the mid-sized regional lender, part of a personnel shake-up affecting half a dozen senior positions, according to filings and news reports since Friday.Guo will be transferred from a current position with Industrial and Commercial Bank of China (ICBC), according to a Hong Kong stock exchange filing. Three other senior appointments will also involve personnel currently with ICBC, according to reports.Analysts said the leadership reshuffle may show that a stake purchase last month led by ICBC was actually a bailout for the lender based in Liaoning province in northeastern China.Bank of Jinzhou grabbed attention in June, after it became the first regional commercial bank to receive credit enhancement from China's central bank.Bank of Jinzhou gets Chinese state backing as ICBC and other financial institutions buy more than 17.3 per cent stake in itEarlier this year Ernst & Young Hua Ming LLP and Ernst & Young resigned as auditors for the bank, citing concerns over loans it had made to institutional customers.The bank's Hong Kong shares have been suspended from trade since April.In late July, three state-owned financial institutions bought a combined 17.3 per cent of shares in the Bank of Jinzhou from existing shareholders.ICBC invested 3 billion yuan (US$435 million) for a 10.8 per cent stake, according to a filing on July 28. Photo: Roy Issa alt=ICBC invested 3 billion yuan (US$435 million) for a 10.8 per cent stake, according to a filing on July 28. Photo: Roy IssaICBC invested 3 billion yuan (US$435 million) for a 10.8 per cent stake, completing the deal through its unit ICBC Financial Asset Investment Co. Two distressed asset managers, China Cinda Asset Management Co and Great Wall Asset Management Co, funded the remaining 7.5 per cent stake.ICBC said it had made "a financial investment" in Bank of Jinzhou, according to its filing to the Shanghai Stock Exchange on July 28.The leadership reshuffle unveiled Monday, however, would indicated a deeper relationship.S&P; Global Ratings credit analyst Liang Yu said policymakers "are adopting an alternative method of managing troubled banks" following the takeover of Baoshang in May.Reports of Baoshang's rescue triggered a liquidity crunch for smaller lenders, as they were forced to cancel fundraising plans after investors pulled out.Liang said smaller banks continue to face tighter liquidity and funding conditions."The credit spreads between the regional banks and major banks widened materially after the Baoshang Bank takeover. We expect this widened spread to persist for some time," Liang said.Shares of ICBC shed 1.9 per cent to close at HK$5.1 in Hong Kong on Monday, while in Shanghai they fell 1.4 per cent to 5.5 yuan.This article originally appeared in the South China Morning Post (SCMP), the most authoritative voice reporting on China and Asia for more than a century. For more SCMP stories, please explore the SCMP app or visit the SCMP's Facebook and Twitter pages. Copyright © 2019 South China Morning Post Publishers Ltd. All rights reserved. Copyright (c) 2019. South China Morning Post Publishers Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • World's Biggest Banks Sink to Record Lows as China Pain Spreads
    Bloomberg

    World's Biggest Banks Sink to Record Lows as China Pain Spreads

    (Bloomberg) -- Stock investors have never been so downbeat on the world’s biggest banks.China’s “big four” state-owned lenders, which together control more than $14 trillion of assets, tumbled to record-low valuations on Monday amid mounting concern that Beijing will encourage them to bail out smaller peers. Industrial & Commercial Bank of China Ltd., the world’s largest lender by assets, lost $11 billion of market value last week after injecting capital into a troubled regional bank as part of a government-orchestrated rescue.Big Chinese lenders have long sacrificed profits in the name of national service, but that prospect has become increasingly worrying as pressure builds on their regional, city and rural peers. Smaller Chinese banks tracked by UBS Group AG need an estimated $349 billion of fresh capital -- a sum they may struggle to raise without support from the likes of ICBC. For shareholders already skittish about the trade war, rising corporate defaults and slowing economic growth, it’s yet another reason to sell.“State-owned commercial banks are clearly suffering from the market impression that they will need to swallow other smaller and weaker banks, at least partially,’’ said Alicia Garcia Herrero, chief economist for Asia Pacific at Natixis SA in Hong Kong.ICBC declined to comment. The China Banking and Insurance Regulatory Commission and press officers at the country’s other mega-banks -- China Construction Bank Corp., Bank of China Ltd., and Agricultural Bank of China Ltd. –- didn’t respond to requests for comment.While the four firms have dominated China’s $40 trillion banking system for decades, they’ve been joined in recent years by a growing number of smaller banks, many of which funded themselves with opaque asset management products and interbank borrowing, instead of more stable consumer deposits. These smaller banks are now getting squeezed as regulators clamp down on risky funding methods and China’s economic slowdown causes bad loans to increase.Their plight has been a major focus of investors since May, when Beijing surprised markets by seizing control of Baoshang Bank Co. in the first government takeover of a Chinese lender in two decades. That was followed two months later by a capital injection into Bank of Jinzhou Co. by ICBC and two other state-owned financial firms.Read more: In Latest China Bank Rescue, Authorities Avoid a TakeoverAnalysts predict that more of China’s roughly 4,000 small lenders will run into trouble and that bigger banks will be asked to play a role in shoring them up. While regulators could in theory allow distressed lenders to fail, that outcome is seen as unlikely because of Beijing’s focus on maintaining financial stability. When authorities imposed losses on a small number of Baoshang Bank’s creditors, it triggered a mini-panic in interbank funding markets that only subsided after big cash injections from the central bank.“The smaller banks, as they require the fire hose, will likely get rolled up into the bigger banks, where they can disappear,” said Christopher Balding, an associate professor at Fulbright University Vietnam who has written extensively on the Chinese economy and financial system.Investors have responded by pummeling Hong Kong-listed shares of the big four, sending prices to record lows relative to book value, or net assets. The stocks traded on Monday at an average price-to-book ratio of 0.61, falling below a previous nadir reached in February 2016.For investors with longer time horizons, it might be a good time to buy, said Terry Sun, a Hong Kong-based analyst at CMB International Securities Ltd. Chinese authorities are unlikely to force big banks to take on more than they can handle, according to Jim Stent, author of “China’s Banking Transformation.’’“Even if you take some pretty severe assumptions on how many banks need to be taken over, you will likely find it’s scarcely a ripple on the profits and balance sheets of the big banks,’’ Stent said. The big four reported combined profits of $140 billion last year, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.Katherine Lei, a Hong Kong-based analyst at JPMorgan Chase & Co., is less sanguine. In a report dated July 29, Lei said she was taking a more cautious view on Chinese bank shares, citing the overhang of troubled smaller lenders as well as rising corporate default risks and increased government pressure to give borrowers favorable interest rates to support economic growth.“The cases of Baoshang and Jinzhou will unlikely be an end,’’ Lei wrote. “Large banks could be brought in to deal with potential small bank problems going forward.’’(Updates with Monday’s trading from second paragraph.)To contact Bloomberg News staff for this story: Jun Luo in Shanghai at jluo6@bloomberg.net;Lucille Liu in Beijing at xliu621@bloomberg.net;Xize Kang in Beijing at xkang7@bloomberg.net;Heng Xie in Beijing at hxie34@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Sam Mamudi at smamudi@bloomberg.net, Michael PattersonFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Moody's

    Industrial & Comm'l Bank of China (Macau) Ltd -- Moody's announces completion of a periodic review of ratings of Industrial & Comm'l Bank of China (Macau) Ltd

    Moody's Investors Service ("Moody's") has completed a periodic review of the ratings of Industrial & Comm'l Bank of China (Macau) Ltd and other ratings that are associated with the same analytical unit. The review was conducted through a portfolio review in which Moody's reassessed the appropriateness of the ratings in the context of the relevant principal methodology(ies), recent developments, and a comparison of the financial and operating profile to similarly rated peers. This publication does not announce a credit rating action and is not an indication of whether or not a credit rating action is likely in the near future.

  • Should You Be Adding Industrial and Commercial Bank of China (HKG:1398) To Your Watchlist Today?
    Simply Wall St.

    Should You Be Adding Industrial and Commercial Bank of China (HKG:1398) To Your Watchlist Today?

    Like a puppy chasing its tail, some new investors often chase 'the next big thing', even if that means buying 'story...

  • Why China Has Chickened Out of Another Bank Seizure
    Bloomberg

    Why China Has Chickened Out of Another Bank Seizure

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- When a lender suffers from a run on deposits or a funding crisis, one solution is a central-bank takeover. The People’s Bank of China, however, is finding that option has shut. Two months after the PBOC seized Baoshang Bank Co., China’s first such move in two decades, regulators have another troubled situation on their hands. On Sunday, Bank of Jinzhou Co., a small regional lender in the rust belt province of Liaoning, got a partial bailout from three state-owned asset managers. A unit of Industrial & Commercial Bank of China Ltd., as well as distressed debt managers China Cinda Asset Management Co. and China Great Wall Asset Management Corp., agreed to buy at least 17% of Jinzhou’s shares.The deal certainly isn’t cheap, for a bank whose books are so muddled that it still hasn’t been able to disclose its 2018 financials. ICBC’s asset-management unit agreed to purchase a 10.8% stake for as much as 3 billion yuan ($440 million), putting the acquisition tag at 0.54 times book, using Jinzhou’s latest available balance-sheet data. At this price, ICBC and Cinda could easily buy better assets: Hong Kong banks, for instance, are valued in the same neighborhood. What’s more, Jinzhou’s book value could be even lower, with more than 40% of its assets tied up in opaque wealth-management products that may have to be written down.So why isn’t the PBOC seizing Jinzhou as well? The central bank certainly has the institutional setup for more takeovers. Since the Baoshang event, the central bank established a deposit insurance fund, similar to the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp., to protect savers. The central bank also has the bandwidth. Jinzhou is hardly a bigger burden than Baoshang – with $113 billion of assets as of June 2018, the lender is just 30% larger than its rescued peer. Because the PBOC never entertained quantitative easing on the scale of the Federal Reserve, its balance sheet remains pretty clean.One consideration may be the stability of the perpetual-bond market. This year, the PBOC has pushed banks to tap this funding channel to replenish their capital.(1) Banks have already issued more than $35 billion of such bonds, a record high, since Bank of China Ltd. kicked off a spate of borrowing in late January. The trouble is, these bonds are only as good as equity in a bankruptcy – in other words, worthless. Dollar-denominated perpetuals issued by small lenders such as Jinzhou, Bank of Zhengzhou Co., Huishang Bank Corp. and Bank of Qingdao Co. all tumbled after the Baoshang seizure. Derailing Beijing’s grand plan for bank recapitalization would be a big no-no. Jinzhou’s problems are also bubbling at a politically sensitive time, just ahead of the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People’s Republic of China. Unlike Baoshang – a subsidiary of conglomerate Tomorrow Holding Co., whose founder Xiao Jianhua was abducted from Hong Kong’s Four Seasons Hotel in 2017 – Jinzhou’s ownership is scattered among several private businesses. China’s enterprises are already wary of President Xi Jinping’s administration: Despite Beijing mouthing support for the sector, state affiliates still tend to benefit disproportionately from the government’s largess. Wiping out private businesses’ equity stakes wouldn’t be a good look right now. The PBOC tried to do the right thing with the Baoshang takeover. But now, fearful of market jitters, the central bank is chickening out. Instead, China has resorted to the old trick of a national team rescue, which does little to break the implicit guarantee of state support. At this rate, investors in China’s $13 trillion bond market have little hope of pricing in the appropriate risks. (1) The PBOC even established a new facility, called the central bank bill swap, encouraginginsurers and asset managers to buy and hold perpetual bonds.To contact the author of this story: Shuli Ren at sren38@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Rachel Rosenthal at rrosenthal21@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Shuli Ren is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering Asian markets. She previously wrote on markets for Barron's, following a career as an investment banker, and is a CFA charterholder.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • China's ICBC and Cinda Asset Management to take combined 17.3% in Bank of Jinzhou
    Reuters

    China's ICBC and Cinda Asset Management to take combined 17.3% in Bank of Jinzhou

    The Industrial and Commercial Bank of China (ICBC), the country's largest lender by assets, and China Cinda Asset Management, one of China's four largest bad banks, said on Sunday they would take stakes in troubled Bank of Jinzhou. Concern has been growing about Bank of Jinzhou since the Hong Kong-listed lender suspended trading in its shares earlier this year and saw its auditor quit. ICBC's ICBC Financial Asset Investment Co unit signed an equity transfer agreement to invest up to 3 billion yuan ($436 million) in a 10.82% stake of Bank of Jinzhou, it said in a statement filed to the Shanghai Stock Exchange.

  • How Does Industrial and Commercial Bank of China Limited (HKG:1398) Fare As A Dividend Stock?
    Simply Wall St.

    How Does Industrial and Commercial Bank of China Limited (HKG:1398) Fare As A Dividend Stock?

    Today we'll take a closer look at Industrial and Commercial Bank of China Limited (HKG:1398) from a dividend...

  • Investors Who Bought Industrial and Commercial Bank of China (HKG:1398) Shares Three Years Ago Are Now Up 43%
    Simply Wall St.

    Investors Who Bought Industrial and Commercial Bank of China (HKG:1398) Shares Three Years Ago Are Now Up 43%

    By buying an index fund, investors can approximate the average market return. But if you choose individual stocks with...

  • Moody's

    Industrial & Comm'l Bank of China, Singapore -- Moody's announces completion of a periodic review of ratings of Industrial & Commercial Bank of China Ltd

    Moody's Investors Service ("Moody's") has completed a periodic review of the ratings of Industrial & Commercial Bank of China Ltd and other ratings that are associated with the same analytical unit. The review was conducted through a portfolio review in which Moody's reassessed the appropriateness of the ratings in the context of the relevant principal methodology(ies), recent developments, and a comparison of the financial and operating profile to similarly rated peers. This publication does not announce a credit rating action and is not an indication of whether or not a credit rating action is likely in the near future.

  • Tencent, Alibaba, Xiaomi units win Hong Kong online banking license
    Reuters

    Tencent, Alibaba, Xiaomi units win Hong Kong online banking license

    Hong Kong's banking regulator has issued four more online-only banking licenses to units of Alibaba, PingAn and smartphone maker Xiaomi, as well as to a JV involving Tencent, ICBC and Hillhouse Capital. The introduction of online-only banking has the potential to be the biggest shake-up in years in the city's retail banking sector dominated by old-guard lenders such as HSBC, Standard Chartered and a slew of Chinese banks.

  • Reuters

    Tencent, Alibaba, Xiaomi units win Hong Kong online banking licence

    Hong Kong's banking regulator has issued four more online-only banking licences to units of Alibaba, PingAn and smartphone maker Xiaomi, as well as to a JV involving Tencent, ICBC and Hillhouse Capital. The introduction of online-only banking has the potential to be the biggest shake-up in years in the city's retail banking sector dominated by old-guard lenders such as HSBC, Standard Chartered and a slew of Chinese banks.

  • Moody's

    ICBC (Argentina) S.A. -- Moody's announces completion of a periodic review of ratings of ICBC (Argentina) S.A.

    Announcement of Periodic Review: Moody's announces completion of a periodic review of ratings of ICBC (Argentina) S.A. New York, April 25, 2019 -- Moody's Investors Service ("Moody's") has completed a periodic review of the ratings of ICBC (Argentina) S.A.and other ratings that are associated with the same analytical unit. The review was conducted through a portfolio review in which Moody's reassessed the appropriateness of the ratings in the context of the relevant principal methodology(ies), recent developments, and a comparison of the financial and operating profile to similarly rated peers.

  • What Should We Expect From Industrial and Commercial Bank of China Limited's (HKG:1398) Earnings Over The Next Few Years?
    Simply Wall St.

    What Should We Expect From Industrial and Commercial Bank of China Limited's (HKG:1398) Earnings Over The Next Few Years?

    Industrial and Commercial Bank of China Limited's (HKG:1398) announced its latest earnings update in December 2018, which showed that the company gained from a smal...

  • Reuters

    MOVES-China picks BoC boss Chen Siqing to head top bank ICBC - sources

    SINGAPORE/BEIJING, April 22 (Reuters) - China has tapped veteran banker Chen Siqing to lead Industrial and Commercial Bank of China Ltd (ICBC), the world's largest lender by assets, three sources with knowledge of the matter told Reuters on Monday. Chen's upcoming appointment as ICBC's chairman has been revealed to a group of senior executives but has not been announced internally to all staff, said the sources, who declined to be named as the matter was confidential. Chen, who has served as chairman of Bank of China since August 2017, is one of the country's most experienced banking executives.

  • Is Industrial and Commercial Bank of China Limited's (HKG:1398) CEO Paid At A Competitive Rate?
    Simply Wall St.

    Is Industrial and Commercial Bank of China Limited's (HKG:1398) CEO Paid At A Competitive Rate?

    Want to participate in a research study? Help shape the future of investing tools and earn a $60 gift card! Shu Gu is the CEO of Industrial and Commercial Bank of China Limited (HKG:1398). First, this article will compare...

  • Reuters

    China's top banks warn of 'fragile' bad loans scenario as economy slows

    BEIJING/HONG KONG (Reuters) - China's top four state-controlled banks warned bad loans could rise and interest margins would shrink industry-wide, as three of them posted their weakest quarterly profit growth in more than two years. Top lender Industrial and Commercial Bank of China (ICBC) reported flat net profit of 58.05 billion yuan ($8.63 billion) for the fourth quarter, the first time it has seen no growth in a quarter since the July-September 2016 quarter. Agricultural Bank of China Ltd (AgBank), the third-largest lender, also posted a drop of 5.4 percent on Friday in fourth-quarter net profit, its first quarterly decline since 2015.

  • Industrial and Commercial Bank of China Limited (HKG:1398): What Does The Future Look Like?
    Simply Wall St.

    Industrial and Commercial Bank of China Limited (HKG:1398): What Does The Future Look Like?

    Since Industrial and Commercial Bank of China Limited (HKG:1398) released its earnings in September 2018, it seems that analyst forecasts are fairly optimistic, as a 6.7% increase in profits isRead More...

  • Reuters

    BRIEF-Tsinghua Tongfang Shareholder ICBC Credit Suisse's Portfolio Unloads Shares In The Company

    March 1 (Reuters) - Tsinghuatongfang Co Ltd: * SAYS SHAREHOLDER ICBC CREDIT SUISSE ASSET MANAGEMENT'S PORTFOLIO HAS UNLOADED 59.3 MILLION SHARES, OR 2 PERCENT STAKE, IN THE COMPANY ON FEB 27 * SAYS SHAREHOLDER ...

  • Reuters

    BRIEF-Tsinghua Tongfang's Shareholder ICBC Credit Suisse's Portfolio To Cut Stake In The Company

    Feb 20 (Reuters) - Tsinghuatongfang Co Ltd: * SAYS SHAREHOLDER ICBC CREDIT SUISSE INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT CO LTD'S PORTFOLIO PLANS TO UNLOAD UP TO 2 PERCENT STAKE IN THE COMPANY WITHIN SIX MONTHS Source ...

  • Is Now An Opportune Moment To Examine Industrial and Commercial Bank of China Limited (HKG:1398)?
    Simply Wall St.

    Is Now An Opportune Moment To Examine Industrial and Commercial Bank of China Limited (HKG:1398)?

    Want to participate in a short research study? Help shape the future of investing tools and you could win a $250 gift card! Let's talk about the popular Industrial andRead More...