ILD.PA - Iliad SA

Paris - Paris Delayed Price. Currency in EUR
91.86
+3.28 (+3.70%)
At close: 5:35PM CEST
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous Close91.72
Open88.62
BidN/A x N/A
AskN/A x N/A
Day's Range88.62 - 91.88
52 Week Range83.10 - 131.50
Volume277,958
Avg. Volume162,979
Market Cap5.404B
Beta (3Y Monthly)0.05
PE Ratio (TTM)17.07
EPS (TTM)5.38
Earnings DateSep 3, 2019
Forward Dividend & Yield0.90 (1.02%)
Ex-Dividend Date2019-06-24
1y Target Est159.14
  • Should You Consider Iliad SA (EPA:ILD)?
    Simply Wall St.

    Should You Consider Iliad SA (EPA:ILD)?

    Iliad SA (EPA:ILD) is a company with exceptional fundamental characteristics. Upon building up an investment case for...

  • Fastweb’s Mobile Push Breaks Italy Telecom’s Consolidation Dream
    Bloomberg

    Fastweb’s Mobile Push Breaks Italy Telecom’s Consolidation Dream

    (Bloomberg) -- Swisscom AG’s Italian unit Fastweb is becoming the fifth wireless carrier in an industry that had aimed to reduce the number of mobile phone players in a bid to fight shrinking revenue.Italy’s Development Ministry awarded Fastweb the license last week, a company representative said. Fastweb, which offers high-speed internet services to consumers and businesses wants to attract more lucrative subscribers from rivals such as Telecom Italia SpA and Vodafone Group Plc in one of the world’s most competitive mobile markets.Fastweb had already provided mobile service by renting space on Telecom Italia’s network. Now, it plans to build its own infrastructure. The company paid about 200 million euros ($223 million) for mobile spectrum and towers from Tiscali SpA last year and then bought 5G frequencies for 32.6 million euros. In June, Fastweb also reached a deal with CK Hutchison Holdings Ltd.’s Wind Tre to share investments to build 5G networks in Italy.Fastweb’s move goes against the consolidation trend in the Italian telecomunications industry that started in 2015, when VimpelCom Ltd. and Hutchison reached a deal to combine their Italian businesses. Between 2013 and 2018, the Italian mobile industry lost 2.4 billion euros of revenue due to a price war among service providers, according to the country’s communications regulator Agcom.When Wind and Tre agreed to merge, industry executives hoped consolidation would ultimately cut the number of Italian carriers to three from four.Instead, France’s Iliad SA, one of Europe’s most aggressive phone carriers in term of pricing, entered the Italian market last year following a request by the European regulator to maintain competition.To contact the reporter on this story: Daniele Lepido in Milan at dlepido1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Rebecca Penty at rpenty@bloomberg.net, Dan LiefgreenFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Dish Agrees to $5 Billion Deal for Wireless Assets
    Bloomberg

    Dish Agrees to $5 Billion Deal for Wireless Assets

    (Bloomberg) -- Satellite-TV provider Dish Network Corp. has agreed to pay $5 billion for wireless assets in a deal with T-Mobile US Inc. and Sprint Corp., setting the stage for the Justice Department to approve the $26.5 billion merger of the mobile-phone carriers, according to people familiar with the matter.After weeks of negotiations, the parties have hammered out an agreement under which Dish will pay about $1.5 billion for prepaid mobile businesses and roughly $3.5 billion for spectrum, said the people, who asked not to be identified because the details are still private. Under the terms of the deal, Dish can’t sell the assets or hand over control of the agreement to a third party for three years, the people said.The accord should allow the Justice Department to sign off on T-Mobile’s merger with Sprint as soon as Thursday. T-Mobile also is expected to reiterate that the economic terms of the Sprint deal, which it said would generate about $43 billion in savings, won’t be affected by the asset sale to Dish, the people said.Representatives for Dish, T-Mobile, Sprint and the Justice Department declined to comment.Sprint shares jumped as much as 7.2% in New York trading Wednesday and T-Mobile gained as much as 1.9%. Dish slipped as much as 2.3%.Shares of SoftBank Group Corp., the Japanese owner of Sprint, rose as much as 3.3% after Bloomberg reported on the Dish deal. T-Mobile is backed by Deutsche Telekom AG, which rose less than 1% in Frankfurt.T-Mobile and Sprint -- and their overseas parent companies -- have spent more than a year fighting to get their merger approved. Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai recommended in May that his agency clear the deal, but the Justice Department has been harder to win over.As part of the Dish agreement, the satellite-TV company gets a seven-year wholesale agreement allowing it to sell T-Mobile wireless service under the Dish brand. The package also includes a three-year service agreement from T-Mobile to provide operational support as prepaid customers shift to Dish.Fourth CarrierThe Justice Department’s antitrust chief, Makan Delrahim, has pushed for an agreement that would be a win for consumers and compensate for the fact that T-Mobile’s merger with Sprint would reduce the number of major players in the wireless industry to three from four.Dish’s role would satisfy the government’s longstanding demand that there be four national mobile-service companies remaining, even after the merger of the third- and fourth-ranked carriers in the market.Critics have noted that the track record for competitors created by divestitures has been dismal. French communications firm Iliad SA became Italy’s fourth carrier last year after buying assets divested by two larger rivals that merged. Iliad had an initial surge in subscriber growth, followed by a slowdown.Even if T-Mobile and Sprint secure the Justice Department’s blessing, they face resistance from a group of state attorneys general. They say the deal should be blocked because it will hinder competition and raise prices.(Updates with shares in fifth paragraph.)To contact the reporters on this story: Nabila Ahmed in New York at nahmed54@bloomberg.net;David McLaughlin in Washington at dmclaughlin9@bloomberg.net;Scott Moritz in New York at smoritz6@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Liana Baker at lbaker75@bloomberg.net, Nick TurnerFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Is Iliad SA's (EPA:ILD) ROE Of 9.2% Concerning?
    Simply Wall St.

    Is Iliad SA's (EPA:ILD) ROE Of 9.2% Concerning?

    One of the best investments we can make is in our own knowledge and skill set. With that in mind, this article will...

  • U.S. Antitrust Boss Playing Kingmaker in T-Mobile’s Deal for Sprint
    Bloomberg

    U.S. Antitrust Boss Playing Kingmaker in T-Mobile’s Deal for Sprint

    (Bloomberg) -- Makan Delrahim, the U.S. Justice Department’s antitrust chief, is trying to shape a deal combining T-Mobile US Inc. and Sprint Corp. that he can pitch as a win for consumers. Here’s how he may do it.If the $26.5 billion deal is approved, it’s likely to include conditions that give satellite TV provider Dish Network Corp. enough airwaves, prepaid customers and network access to emerge as a new national wireless competitor.That would allow T-Mobile and financially struggling Sprint to merge and create a stronger No. 3 rival to AT&T Inc. and Verizon Communications Inc. Dish’s role would satisfy the government’s longstanding demand that there be four national mobile-service companies remaining.“The right deal could be a genuine win for consumers, and if Delrahim structures it right, the facts and history will stand by him,” said Jonathan Chaplin, an analyst with New Street Research LLC.The Justice Department is nearing a final decision. While the broad outline of an accord has been established, key issues are still being debated -- including possible limits on Dish’s ambitions as a wireless carrier. The company owns billions of dollars in unused airwaves that could be tapped to create an even more formidable competitor if it’s free to obtain sufficient outside investment to build its own network, according to people familiar with the matter.Under that broad outline, Sprint’s airwaves would land in more financially stable hands. The No. 4 U.S. carrier has the most mobile-phone spectrum in the U.S. but has limited ability to build a network given its years of losses and financial constraints. Combining with No. 3 T-Mobile would solve those problems.Opponents LurkEven if Delrahim gives his blessing, he’ll still have to convince opponents that consumers won’t see higher prices and fewer choices. One point he’ll likely to highlight is that the deal provides a path to putting Dish’s trove of airwaves to work. The department declined to comment.Skeptics point out that the track record for competitors created by divestitures has been dismal. French communications firm Iliad SA became Italy’s fourth carrier last year after buying assets divested by two larger rivals that merged. Iliad had an initial surge in subscriber growth, followed by a slowdown across the sector.“The premise that this deal will be good for everyone may be a little overly optimistic,” said Phil Berenbroick of Public Knowledge, a consumer advocacy group in Washington. “It’s obvious how harmful they think the deal is if they have to create a remedy as extravagant as this.”New KidThe shift to wireless will be a challenge for Dish, which is better known as the second-largest U.S. satellite TV provider. Dish has no experience selling phones or operating a mobile service. As part of the deal taking shape, the company would take over fewer than 9 million prepaid customers from Sprint to get its wireless business started. But that’s a tiny runway to competing against incumbent carriers with 10 times more subscribers.The future looks better for T-Mobile. With Sprint’s spectrum, it will have nearly twice the wireless capacity of any other carrier. The company’s cost per gigabyte, a measure of how expensive it is to deliver service, will be cut in half, Chaplin said.“If that isn’t a recipe for lower prices and share gains, I don’t know what is,” he said.Judgment DayThe merger has already won a nod from the chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, provided the combined company divests its Boost prepaid business, freezes prices and deploys a 5G network that would cover 99% of the U.S. population within six years.If the Justice Department approves, T-Mobile and Sprint would gain an important ally as they fight a lawsuit challenging the merger brought in June by 13 states and the District of Columbia. The states argue the tie-up will harm competition and lead to higher prices.Chaplin said investors may provide a crucial clue when the Justice Department announces its now-expected approval.“Watch what happens to the stock price of AT&T and Verizon on the day the deal is announced,” he said. “That will be the best litmus test of whether the deal is good for consumers, or not. If their stock prices fall, it is probably a good deal for consumers.”\--With assistance from Todd Shields.To contact the reporters on this story: Scott Moritz in New York at smoritz6@bloomberg.net;David McLaughlin in Washington at dmclaughlin9@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Nick Turner at nturner7@bloomberg.net, Rob GolumFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • What Kind Of Investor Owns Most Of Iliad SA (EPA:ILD)?
    Simply Wall St.

    What Kind Of Investor Owns Most Of Iliad SA (EPA:ILD)?

    If you want to know who really controls Iliad SA (EPA:ILD), then you'll have to look at the makeup of its share...

  • Does Iliad SA's (EPA:ILD) P/E Ratio Signal A Buying Opportunity?
    Simply Wall St.

    Does Iliad SA's (EPA:ILD) P/E Ratio Signal A Buying Opportunity?

    This article is for investors who would like to improve their understanding of price to earnings ratios (P/E ratios...

  • GlobeNewswire

    Iliad successfully carries out its first-ever Schuldscheindarlehen issue, raising €500 million

    Paris, May 22, 2019 Iliad successfully carries out its first-ever Schuldscheindarlehen issue, raising €500 million Today, Iliad.

  • France: 5G telecoms decision based on security and performance, nobody to be ruled out
    Reuters

    France: 5G telecoms decision based on security and performance, nobody to be ruled out

    Finance Minister Bruno Le Maire said a decision by France regarding the 5G telecoms network would be based on security and performance of networks, and added that Paris would not rule out a specific operator as not being welcome. Last week, French President Emmanuel Macron said it was not the aim of France to block Huawei, nor to launch any form of technological war, a day after the U.S. government moved to blacklist the Chinese telecoms giant. "We want to carry out a careful control of this 5G deployment ... without designating an operator as unwelcome in France," Le Maire told reporters on Tuesday.

  • Reuters

    France to push ahead with 5G launch in 2020 despite Huawei woes

    PARIS (Reuters) - France will launch the deployment of its 5G network as planned in 2020 despite current difficulties faced by China's Huawei which could push some telecoms operators to modify their source ...

  • How Do Analysts See Iliad SA (EPA:ILD) Performing Over The Next Few Years?
    Simply Wall St.

    How Do Analysts See Iliad SA (EPA:ILD) Performing Over The Next Few Years?

    The latest earnings release Iliad SA's (EPA:ILD) announced in December 2018 revealed that the company faced a immense...

  • Reuters

    Telecom Italia would be happy to expand 5G accord to Iliad: CEO

    Telecom Italia would be happy to share the cost of securing 5G frequencies with other operators such as France's Iliad in addition to Vodafone, the chief executive of the Italian telecoms incumbent said. 5G frequencies were very expensive ... so it's important to share costs," CEO Luigi Gubitosi said.

  • Reuters

    Cellnex CEO says UK's CTIL matches its criteria as takeover target

    MADRID (Reuters) - Spanish phone towers group Cellnex may consider a takeover bid for British tower company CTIL, but could not afford to invest in France's TDF after agreeing to buy 10,700 sites in France, ...

  • Reuters

    French tycoon Niel to sell mobile towers to Cellnex for 2.7 billion euros

    PARIS/MADRID (Reuters) - French tycoon Xavier Niel has agreed a 2.7 billion euro (2.3 billion pounds) deal to sell mobile towers in France, Italy and Switzerland to Cellnex as he seeks to bolster the finances of his telecoms group Iliad. Iliad burnt through 1.44 billion euros in cash in 2018, twice as much as in 2017, and has lost half its market value over the last year. The deal by billionaire Niel, considered a maverick in France's telecoms sector, follows a similar one by French rival Bouygues Telecom in 2017 under which it sold about 3,000 mobile sites to Cellnex for 900 million euros.

  • GlobeNewswire

    Iliad and Cellnex form a strategic partnership

    Iliad S.A. ("Iliad") announces today that it entered into a series of agreements with Cellnex to form a strategic partnership with respect to the Group's passive mobile telecom infrastructure in France and Italy. In France, Iliad has entered into exclusive negotiations for the sale of 70% of the company that manages its mobile telecom infrastructure equivalent to 5,700 sites. In Italy, Iliad Italia has signed an agreement for the sale of the entire capital of the company that manages its mobile telecom infrastructure equivalent to 2,200 sites.

  • Reuters

    Fierce competition dents telecoms group Orange's French revenues

    Telecoms group Orange's quarterly revenues in France fell for the first time in two years, highlighting the tough competitive environment in the country where rivals are engaged in a race to win market share. First-quarter sales in France, which represents more than 40 percent of its activity, dropped by 1.8 percent on a comparable basis to 4.41 billion euros (£3.8 billion). The French telecoms market remains one of the toughest in Europe, with Orange's rivals Altice Europe, Bouygues Telecom and Iliad all controlled by billionaires who have failed to consolidate their position in the market through mergers over the past few years.

  • Reuters

    French regulator fines Iliad and chairman Lombardini

    France's AMF stock market regulator said it had fined telecoms group Iliad and Iliad's chairman, Maxime Lombardini, for incorrect financial communication regarding certain deals in 2014. The AMF's fines concerned Iliad's brief interest in T-Mobile U.S. in 2014 and to some share sales in July 2014. Iliad had denied any wrongdoing.