ILIAY - Iliad SA

Other OTC - Other OTC Delayed Price. Currency in USD
6.25
0.00 (0.00%)
At close: 1:10PM EST
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Previous Close6.25
Open6.25
Bid0.00 x 0
Ask0.00 x 0
Day's Range6.25 - 6.25
52 Week Range4.40 - 6.25
Volume481
Avg. Volume9
Market Cap8.593B
Beta (5Y Monthly)0.25
PE Ratio (TTM)17.44
EPS (TTM)0.36
Earnings DateN/A
Forward Dividend & Yield0.02 (0.25%)
Ex-Dividend DateFeb 06, 2020
1y Target EstN/A
  • Can You Imagine How Iliad's (EPA:ILD) Shareholders Feel About The 49% Share Price Increase?
    Simply Wall St.

    Can You Imagine How Iliad's (EPA:ILD) Shareholders Feel About The 49% Share Price Increase?

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  • Telecoms group Iliad formally launches 1.4 billion euro capital increase
    Reuters

    Telecoms group Iliad formally launches 1.4 billion euro capital increase

    French telecoms and media group Iliad formally launched on Monday its previously announced plan for a 1.4 billion euros ($1.6 billion) capital increase, which will be used to finance a share buyback offer. Iliad, which runs the Free telecoms and internet service, said the capital increase would be priced at 120 euros per share, marking a discount of around 2.4% to Iliad's closing price of 123 euros on Jan. 17.

  • Should You Be Worried About Iliad SA's (EPA:ILD) 5.2% Return On Equity?
    Simply Wall St.

    Should You Be Worried About Iliad SA's (EPA:ILD) 5.2% Return On Equity?

    One of the best investments we can make is in our own knowledge and skill set. With that in mind, this article will...

  • Reuters

    Telecoms group Orange kicks off the carving-out of its towers in Europe

    Orange said it planned to carve out its mobile towers in most European countries where it is present, in a move aimed at shoring up the telecom group's value as tough competition in the region has hampered its growth and margins. The Paris-based company will retain control over all these new entities and is hoping to eventually merge them into a European company. "It is a vehicle that will enable us to play a possible role in consolidation at European level," Chief Executive Officer Stephane Richard said in a call with reporters on Wednesday.

  • Benzinga

    14 Most Shorted European Stocks

    European stocks have severely lagged U.S. stocks over the past year. In that stretch, the iShares MSCI EMU Index (BATS: EZU ) is up just 6%, while the SPDR S&P 500 ETF Trust (NYSE: SPY ) is up 50.9%. Eurozone ...

  • A Rising Share Price Has Us Looking Closely At Iliad SA's (EPA:ILD) P/E Ratio
    Simply Wall St.

    A Rising Share Price Has Us Looking Closely At Iliad SA's (EPA:ILD) P/E Ratio

    Iliad (EPA:ILD) shareholders are no doubt pleased to see that the share price has had a great month, posting a 32...

  • France's Bad Boy of Telecoms Joins the Geriatric Set
    Bloomberg

    France's Bad Boy of Telecoms Joins the Geriatric Set

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Xavier Niel is supposed to be the bad boy of French telecoms. He never finished college, once ran an online sex-chat service, and shook up incumbents like Orange SA with cheap pricing when he launched Free Mobile in 2012.That makes one element of his push to extend control over Free’s parent Iliad SA particularly surprising: the implicit admission that the Paris-based company is becoming just like any other boring telecom company. It's an overdue acknowledgement of market realities.It all comes down to the dividend. Mobile carriers have appealed to investors over the past decade not for their growth prospects but their generous dividend payouts. European telecommunications firms will have an average dividend yield of 5% this year, according to estimates compiled by Bloomberg. That compares with the 3.3% average of the broader Stoxx 600 Index of European companies.Iliad has differed from the crowd. Its 12-month yield has averaged 0.8% since 2009. That’s because it promised growth — the stock climbed almost three-fold between 2009 and 2017. But the past two years have been a different story. Before today, the shares had fallen 63% from their 2017 peak as French rivals reclaimed market share from the low-cost upstart.On Tuesday, Niel announced plans to boost his holding in the firm by as much as 20 percentage points. The complicated structure will see Iliad buy back up to 1.4 billion euros ($1.5 billion) of stock for 120 euros per share, then issue new shares of an equivalent amount that Niel has pledged to buy, in a rights issue to which other shareholders can also subscribe. At the same time, Iliad announced it would increase the dividend by a chunky 189% to 2.60 euros, bringing the yield to more than 2%. That’s still very much at the low end of its peers but a substantial change in policy, particularly at a time when the region’s giants — Vodafone Group Plc and Deutsche Telekom AG — are cutting their dividends as they anticipate increased spending on 5G networks.For Niel, it’s a canny way of using the company’s stronger balance sheet to extend his control. Iliad is expecting proceeds of more than 2 billion euros from the sale of infrastructure assets this year. If he increases his stake to above 70% from the current 52%, as the buyback and rights issue might allow, he can expect annual dividend proceeds exceeding 100 million euros. That can help him service the personal debt that he’s likely assuming to fund the rights issue. The move may also strengthen Niel's hand and his financial upside, should the perennial on-again, off-again efforts to consolidate the French market resume.The steps at Iliad don’t particularly disadvantage existing shareholders financially, even if they do seem to be very much in Niel’s interest. They’re under no obligation to sell, and have already benefited from a jump in the share price, which climbed 18% on Tuesday. Nor does the increased payout significantly weaken the firm’s finances: The dividend payout will top 154 million euros. Net debt of 3.7 times Ebitda will fall closer to 2.5 times Ebitda. And it’s far less outrageous than the self-interested efforts of fellow French billionaire Vincent Bollore and his family to extend control over Vivendi SA. The Bollores are simply carrying out a buyback of the media conglomerate’s shares, then canceling them, leaving the family with a bigger stake without increasing their financial risk.But for all of Niel’s assertions that the investment reflects his “confidence in the company’s industrial project,” he will likely need Iliad to continue the more generous dividend payouts to service his greater debt. That will gradually chip away at Iliad’s ability to engage in costly price wars to drive market share. Instead, it’s becoming more like its rivals, generating steadier, more predictable returns, rather than promising stratospheric stock growth.To contact the author of this story: Alex Webb at awebb25@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Melissa Pozsgay at mpozsgay@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Alex Webb is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering Europe's technology, media and communications industries. He previously covered Apple and other technology companies for Bloomberg News in San Francisco.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Iliad founder ready to pour 1.4 billion euros into the telecom firm
    Reuters

    Iliad founder ready to pour 1.4 billion euros into the telecom firm

    French billionaire Xavier Niel said on Tuesday he was ready to pour 1.4 billion euros into Iliad to show his commitment to the telecoms group he founded and majority owns, despite several tough quarters and a share price plunge. Iliad, whose cut-price phone deals shook up France's mobile market, was beaten at its own game in recent quarters as a price war dented its market share, undermined its profitability and more than halved the value of shares in the past two years. Niel, who owns a little more than 52% of Iliad, said in a call with analysts that he heard the frustration of some of the group's shareholders but that he still believed in its strategy.

  • Here’s why Iliad SA’s (EPA:ILD) Returns On Capital Matters So Much
    Simply Wall St.

    Here’s why Iliad SA’s (EPA:ILD) Returns On Capital Matters So Much

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  • Is Iliad (EPA:ILD) Using Too Much Debt?
    Simply Wall St.

    Is Iliad (EPA:ILD) Using Too Much Debt?

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  • U.S. Firms Steer Clear of Europe's Big Mobile Tower Sell-Off
    Bloomberg

    U.S. Firms Steer Clear of Europe's Big Mobile Tower Sell-Off

    (Bloomberg) -- European phone companies are selling their mobile masts and growth-hungry U.S. tower companies have money to spend -- it looks like a marriage made in heaven.Instead, firms like American Tower Corp. and Crown Castle International Corp. are largely staying away, making it easier for Spain’s Cellnex Telecom SA and infrastructure funds managed by Macquarie Group Ltd., KKR & Co. and others to sweep up the region’s tower assets.Their hesitation is driven partly by price: the global hunt for yield has driven up the premium for these assets, which offer reliable, steady income streams. Independent tower companies also won’t pay top dollar unless they see a path to significant revenue growth -- and that’s where they have a problem with Europe.“The American tower companies say, ‘OK, Europe is fine at the right price, but prices are not where we need them to be, so we think the opportunities elsewhere are more attractive,”’ said Nick Del Deo, senior analyst at U.S. research firm MoffettNathanson.Tens of thousands of European masts are expected to see ownership changes in the next two years as companies such as Iliad SA, Vodafone Group Plc and Telecom Italia SpA bring in new investors to reduce debt and share the heavy cost of rolling out 5G technology.But only a quarter are likely to end up with independent operators, according to TowerXchange. Vodafone and CK Hutchison Holdings Ltd. are creating separate units for almost 90,000 towers and the consultancy expects them to maintain control over those businesses. That’s a turn-off for independent companies, which try to maximize revenue by leasing mast space to as many network operators as possible.Many European carriers want to keep some hold on their towers because they see mobile infrastructure as a strategic asset that can help them manage costs and perhaps gain a competitive edge. They’re also mindful of what happened in the U.S., where operators rushed to sell their towers more than a decade ago only to find themselves stuck with a big bill for leases and capacity rights.Vodafone Surges on Possible IPO, Stake Sale of Towers UnitVodafone and Telefonica Ink 5G Terms in Move to U.K. Tower SalesNiel Agrees to $3 Billion of Phone Tower Sales to CellnexCK Hutchison to Separate Out European Phone Towers BusinessSelling full ownership of towers to independent players can spur innovation and reduce expenses by encouraging carriers to share infrastructure, avoiding costly duplication. European carriers’ insistence on maintaining control means the continent’s progress in rolling out 5G will likely continue to be slower compared to the U.S., where towers are largely in independent hands.“There is a risk that the European carriers go too far the other way,” Del Deo said. “The captive tower model, if you look globally, has never proven to be that effective.”For now, American Tower is mostly relying on building towers in Africa, Latin America and India for its international growth.Crown Castle didn’t respond to a request for comment on its future European asset bidding plans. American Tower declined to comment. Its chief executive officer, James Taiclet, told analysts last month that recent large European tower sales didn’t meet its bar for growth prospects and asset costs.Here are some other reasons why U.S. tower firms aren’t piling into Europe:Redundancy: Europe has more cases of towers operated by rival carriers sitting in close proximity. An independent owner may want to remove one to cut costs, but the tower often comes with a ground lease that they must keep paying for years.Less Potential: Europe has lots of rooftop antenna sites, which can’t accommodate as many customers as can a ground-based tower. Many European portfolios include broadcast towers in rural areas that may not be as valuable as mobile towers.Radio Emission Rules: In some countries, rules on maximum electromagnetic radio emissions limit the number of antennas a tower firm can install at a single site.\--With assistance from Scott Moritz.To contact the reporter on this story: Thomas Pfeiffer in London at tpfeiffer3@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Kenneth Wong at kwong11@bloomberg.net, Jennifer Ryan, Anthony PalazzoFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Here's What You Should Know About Iliad SA's (EPA:ILD) 1.0% Dividend Yield
    Simply Wall St.

    Here's What You Should Know About Iliad SA's (EPA:ILD) 1.0% Dividend Yield

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  • Should You Consider Iliad SA (EPA:ILD)?
    Simply Wall St.

    Should You Consider Iliad SA (EPA:ILD)?

    Iliad SA (EPA:ILD) is a company with exceptional fundamental characteristics. Upon building up an investment case for...

  • Fastweb’s Mobile Push Breaks Italy Telecom’s Consolidation Dream
    Bloomberg

    Fastweb’s Mobile Push Breaks Italy Telecom’s Consolidation Dream

    (Bloomberg) -- Swisscom AG’s Italian unit Fastweb is becoming the fifth wireless carrier in an industry that had aimed to reduce the number of mobile phone players in a bid to fight shrinking revenue.Italy’s Development Ministry awarded Fastweb the license last week, a company representative said. Fastweb, which offers high-speed internet services to consumers and businesses wants to attract more lucrative subscribers from rivals such as Telecom Italia SpA and Vodafone Group Plc in one of the world’s most competitive mobile markets.Fastweb had already provided mobile service by renting space on Telecom Italia’s network. Now, it plans to build its own infrastructure. The company paid about 200 million euros ($223 million) for mobile spectrum and towers from Tiscali SpA last year and then bought 5G frequencies for 32.6 million euros. In June, Fastweb also reached a deal with CK Hutchison Holdings Ltd.’s Wind Tre to share investments to build 5G networks in Italy.Fastweb’s move goes against the consolidation trend in the Italian telecomunications industry that started in 2015, when VimpelCom Ltd. and Hutchison reached a deal to combine their Italian businesses. Between 2013 and 2018, the Italian mobile industry lost 2.4 billion euros of revenue due to a price war among service providers, according to the country’s communications regulator Agcom.When Wind and Tre agreed to merge, industry executives hoped consolidation would ultimately cut the number of Italian carriers to three from four.Instead, France’s Iliad SA, one of Europe’s most aggressive phone carriers in term of pricing, entered the Italian market last year following a request by the European regulator to maintain competition.To contact the reporter on this story: Daniele Lepido in Milan at dlepido1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Rebecca Penty at rpenty@bloomberg.net, Dan LiefgreenFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Dish Agrees to $5 Billion Deal for Wireless Assets
    Bloomberg

    Dish Agrees to $5 Billion Deal for Wireless Assets

    (Bloomberg) -- Satellite-TV provider Dish Network Corp. has agreed to pay $5 billion for wireless assets in a deal with T-Mobile US Inc. and Sprint Corp., setting the stage for the Justice Department to approve the $26.5 billion merger of the mobile-phone carriers, according to people familiar with the matter.After weeks of negotiations, the parties have hammered out an agreement under which Dish will pay about $1.5 billion for prepaid mobile businesses and roughly $3.5 billion for spectrum, said the people, who asked not to be identified because the details are still private. Under the terms of the deal, Dish can’t sell the assets or hand over control of the agreement to a third party for three years, the people said.The accord should allow the Justice Department to sign off on T-Mobile’s merger with Sprint as soon as Thursday. T-Mobile also is expected to reiterate that the economic terms of the Sprint deal, which it said would generate about $43 billion in savings, won’t be affected by the asset sale to Dish, the people said.Representatives for Dish, T-Mobile, Sprint and the Justice Department declined to comment.Sprint shares jumped as much as 7.2% in New York trading Wednesday and T-Mobile gained as much as 1.9%. Dish slipped as much as 2.3%.Shares of SoftBank Group Corp., the Japanese owner of Sprint, rose as much as 3.3% after Bloomberg reported on the Dish deal. T-Mobile is backed by Deutsche Telekom AG, which rose less than 1% in Frankfurt.T-Mobile and Sprint -- and their overseas parent companies -- have spent more than a year fighting to get their merger approved. Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai recommended in May that his agency clear the deal, but the Justice Department has been harder to win over.As part of the Dish agreement, the satellite-TV company gets a seven-year wholesale agreement allowing it to sell T-Mobile wireless service under the Dish brand. The package also includes a three-year service agreement from T-Mobile to provide operational support as prepaid customers shift to Dish.Fourth CarrierThe Justice Department’s antitrust chief, Makan Delrahim, has pushed for an agreement that would be a win for consumers and compensate for the fact that T-Mobile’s merger with Sprint would reduce the number of major players in the wireless industry to three from four.Dish’s role would satisfy the government’s longstanding demand that there be four national mobile-service companies remaining, even after the merger of the third- and fourth-ranked carriers in the market.Critics have noted that the track record for competitors created by divestitures has been dismal. French communications firm Iliad SA became Italy’s fourth carrier last year after buying assets divested by two larger rivals that merged. Iliad had an initial surge in subscriber growth, followed by a slowdown.Even if T-Mobile and Sprint secure the Justice Department’s blessing, they face resistance from a group of state attorneys general. They say the deal should be blocked because it will hinder competition and raise prices.(Updates with shares in fifth paragraph.)To contact the reporters on this story: Nabila Ahmed in New York at nahmed54@bloomberg.net;David McLaughlin in Washington at dmclaughlin9@bloomberg.net;Scott Moritz in New York at smoritz6@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Liana Baker at lbaker75@bloomberg.net, Nick TurnerFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Is Iliad SA's (EPA:ILD) ROE Of 9.2% Concerning?
    Simply Wall St.

    Is Iliad SA's (EPA:ILD) ROE Of 9.2% Concerning?

    One of the best investments we can make is in our own knowledge and skill set. With that in mind, this article will...

  • U.S. Antitrust Boss Playing Kingmaker in T-Mobile’s Deal for Sprint
    Bloomberg

    U.S. Antitrust Boss Playing Kingmaker in T-Mobile’s Deal for Sprint

    (Bloomberg) -- Makan Delrahim, the U.S. Justice Department’s antitrust chief, is trying to shape a deal combining T-Mobile US Inc. and Sprint Corp. that he can pitch as a win for consumers. Here’s how he may do it.If the $26.5 billion deal is approved, it’s likely to include conditions that give satellite TV provider Dish Network Corp. enough airwaves, prepaid customers and network access to emerge as a new national wireless competitor.That would allow T-Mobile and financially struggling Sprint to merge and create a stronger No. 3 rival to AT&T Inc. and Verizon Communications Inc. Dish’s role would satisfy the government’s longstanding demand that there be four national mobile-service companies remaining.“The right deal could be a genuine win for consumers, and if Delrahim structures it right, the facts and history will stand by him,” said Jonathan Chaplin, an analyst with New Street Research LLC.The Justice Department is nearing a final decision. While the broad outline of an accord has been established, key issues are still being debated -- including possible limits on Dish’s ambitions as a wireless carrier. The company owns billions of dollars in unused airwaves that could be tapped to create an even more formidable competitor if it’s free to obtain sufficient outside investment to build its own network, according to people familiar with the matter.Under that broad outline, Sprint’s airwaves would land in more financially stable hands. The No. 4 U.S. carrier has the most mobile-phone spectrum in the U.S. but has limited ability to build a network given its years of losses and financial constraints. Combining with No. 3 T-Mobile would solve those problems.Opponents LurkEven if Delrahim gives his blessing, he’ll still have to convince opponents that consumers won’t see higher prices and fewer choices. One point he’ll likely to highlight is that the deal provides a path to putting Dish’s trove of airwaves to work. The department declined to comment.Skeptics point out that the track record for competitors created by divestitures has been dismal. French communications firm Iliad SA became Italy’s fourth carrier last year after buying assets divested by two larger rivals that merged. Iliad had an initial surge in subscriber growth, followed by a slowdown across the sector.“The premise that this deal will be good for everyone may be a little overly optimistic,” said Phil Berenbroick of Public Knowledge, a consumer advocacy group in Washington. “It’s obvious how harmful they think the deal is if they have to create a remedy as extravagant as this.”New KidThe shift to wireless will be a challenge for Dish, which is better known as the second-largest U.S. satellite TV provider. Dish has no experience selling phones or operating a mobile service. As part of the deal taking shape, the company would take over fewer than 9 million prepaid customers from Sprint to get its wireless business started. But that’s a tiny runway to competing against incumbent carriers with 10 times more subscribers.The future looks better for T-Mobile. With Sprint’s spectrum, it will have nearly twice the wireless capacity of any other carrier. The company’s cost per gigabyte, a measure of how expensive it is to deliver service, will be cut in half, Chaplin said.“If that isn’t a recipe for lower prices and share gains, I don’t know what is,” he said.Judgment DayThe merger has already won a nod from the chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, provided the combined company divests its Boost prepaid business, freezes prices and deploys a 5G network that would cover 99% of the U.S. population within six years.If the Justice Department approves, T-Mobile and Sprint would gain an important ally as they fight a lawsuit challenging the merger brought in June by 13 states and the District of Columbia. The states argue the tie-up will harm competition and lead to higher prices.Chaplin said investors may provide a crucial clue when the Justice Department announces its now-expected approval.“Watch what happens to the stock price of AT&T and Verizon on the day the deal is announced,” he said. “That will be the best litmus test of whether the deal is good for consumers, or not. If their stock prices fall, it is probably a good deal for consumers.”\--With assistance from Todd Shields.To contact the reporters on this story: Scott Moritz in New York at smoritz6@bloomberg.net;David McLaughlin in Washington at dmclaughlin9@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Nick Turner at nturner7@bloomberg.net, Rob GolumFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • What Kind Of Investor Owns Most Of Iliad SA (EPA:ILD)?
    Simply Wall St.

    What Kind Of Investor Owns Most Of Iliad SA (EPA:ILD)?

    If you want to know who really controls Iliad SA (EPA:ILD), then you'll have to look at the makeup of its share...

  • Does Iliad SA's (EPA:ILD) P/E Ratio Signal A Buying Opportunity?
    Simply Wall St.

    Does Iliad SA's (EPA:ILD) P/E Ratio Signal A Buying Opportunity?

    This article is for investors who would like to improve their understanding of price to earnings ratios (P/E ratios...

  • How Do Analysts See Iliad SA (EPA:ILD) Performing Over The Next Few Years?
    Simply Wall St.

    How Do Analysts See Iliad SA (EPA:ILD) Performing Over The Next Few Years?

    The latest earnings release Iliad SA's (EPA:ILD) announced in December 2018 revealed that the company faced a immense...