IVOO - Vanguard S&P Mid-Cap 400 Index Fund ETF Shares

NYSEArca - NYSEArca Delayed Price. Currency in USD
130.35
+0.37 (+0.28%)
At close: 3:59PM EDT
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous Close129.98
Open130.16
Bid0.00 x 1400
Ask0.00 x 1200
Day's Range129.91 - 130.48
52 Week Range105.30 - 138.74
Volume17,527
Avg. Volume30,528
Net Assets2.08B
NAV130.02
PE Ratio (TTM)N/A
Yield1.44%
YTD Return15.06%
Beta (3Y Monthly)1.16
Expense Ratio (net)0.15%
Inception Date2010-09-07
Trade prices are not sourced from all markets
  • InvestorPlace3 months ago

    5 Mutual Funds With Huge Minimum Investments

    One of the primary reasons so many advisors and investors gravitate to ETFs over mutual funds is the low fees available on ETFs. An often overlooked reason why so many retail investors embrace ETFs over mutual funds is minimum investments.As in many mutual funds require minimum investments while no ETFs do. Some mutual funds have tolerable minimum investments of $500 or $1,000. Others start at $2,500 or $3,000 while some other mutual funds require minimum investments that makes these funds off-limits to a large portion of investors.Another irksome point about mutual funds' minimum investments that the higher the required investment, the lower a fund's fees are likely to be. With ETFs, the expense ratio is the expense ratio, regardless of how much investors put into the fund.InvestorPlace - Stock Market News, Stock Advice & Trading Tips"The main thing to understand is that the lower the investment minimum, the higher the expense ratio usually is," according to Morningstar. "The reasoning is that it's more difficult to maintain many accounts with low balances than fewer accounts with lots of assets. So although the strategy and investment portfolio (and investment manager, if applicable) are the same across all share classes, the expense ratios will differ." * 7 Top Stocks to Buy From Goldman Sachs' Secret Portfolio Here are some examples of mutual funds with minimum investments that are likely to catch investors' eyes -- but not in a good way. Vanguard S&P Mid-Cap 400 Index Fund Institutional Shares (VSPMX)Minimum investment: $5,000,000.No need to do a double-take. The Vanguard S&P Mid-Cap 400 Index Fund Institutional Shares (MUTF:VSPMX) really does have a minimum investment of $5,000,000, according to Vanguard data.In fairness to this Vanguard mutual fund, VSPMX, at its name implies, is the institutional share class of a mutual fund with several share classes. But all of these have required investments that are significantly lower than $5,000,000.And for investors that want to dodge minimum investments altogether, the this mutual fund is available in ETF form via Vanguard S&P MidCap 400 ETF (NYSEARCA:IVOO). That ETF charges just 0.15% per year. Vanguard Health Care Fund Investor Shares (VGHCX)Minimum investment: $3,000There was a time when the Vanguard Health Care Fund Investor Shares (MUTF:VGHCX) had a minimum investment that was far higher than the $3,000 investors see today. This is an actively managed healthcare mutual fund with a lengthy track record."For more than 25 years, this actively managed fund has offered investors low-cost exposure to domestic and foreign companies involved in various aspects of the health care industry, such as pharmaceutical firms, medical supply companies, and research firms," according to Vanguard. * 5 Warren Buffett Stocks You Can't Go Wrong With While it is not an ETF replica of VGHCX, the Vanguard Health Care ETF (NYSEARCA:VHT) is a suitable alternative for investors looking for lower-fee, no minimum investment product. VHT charges just 0.10% per year, making it one of the least expensive healthcare funds -- ETF or mutual fund -- on the market. Calamos Convertible I (CICVX)Minimum Investment: $1,000,000This share class of the Calamos Convertible I (MUTF:CICVX) really does require a minimum investment of $1,000,000. Fortunately, the issuer has a pair of other share classes for this mutual fund that have much more reasonable minimum investments of $500.Convertible bonds are popular with some fixed income investors because the bonds can be converted into common stock of the issuing company, giving convertibles higher correlations to stocks than other fixed income asset classes. Plus, convertibles often perform well when interest rates rise.Over half the bonds in this mutual fund are issued by technology and healthcare companies. The fund has a 30-day SEC yield of 1%. AQR Large Cap Defensive Style Fund (AUEIX)Minimum investment: $100,000 or $5,000,000The AQR Large Cap Defensive Style Fund Class I (MUTF:AUEIX) has a minimum investment of $100,000, but that is only for institutional investors. Individual investors that want to get involved with mutual fund face a minimum investment of $5,000,000, according to issuer data.Hey, at least this mutual fund does not have loads or redemption fees. In many ways, AUEIX is a standard large-cap mutual fund, looking to capture upside in bull markets while potentially experiencing less downside when markets decline. * 7 Growth Stocks Racing to All-Time Highs At the end of last year, AUEIX allocated almost a third of its combined weight to the defensive healthcare and consumer staples sectors. Technology and financial services stocks combined for 29.40% of the mutual fund's weight. Vanguard Consumer Staples Index Fund Admiral Shares (VCSAX)Minimum investment: $100,000.This is another case of a particular share class of a Vanguard mutual fund carrying a high required investment while also having several more affordable share classes. The Vanguard Consumer Staples Index Fund Admiral Shares (MUTF:VCSAX) is an index fund, not a mutual fund, tracking a sector that is popular with conservative, income-oriented investors.This mutual fund's roster "includes stocks of companies that provide direct-to-consumer products that, based on consumer spending habits, are considered essential to daily life," according to Vanguard.Investors can dodge the required minimum investment with the Vanguard Consumer Staples ETF (NYSEARCA:VDC), which is also one of the least expensive staples ETFs on the market.Todd Shriber does not own any of the aforementioned securities. More From InvestorPlace * 2 Toxic Pot Stocks You Should Avoid * 7 Growth Stocks Racing to All-Time Highs * 5 Warren Buffett Stocks You Can't Go Wrong With * Game On for These 3 Gaming Stocks Compare Brokers The post 5 Mutual Funds With Huge Minimum Investments appeared first on InvestorPlace.

  • Have US Equity Indexes Made Oil’s Fall Sharper?
    Market Realist4 months ago

    Have US Equity Indexes Made Oil’s Fall Sharper?

    What Drove Your Energy Portfolio This Week?(Continued from Prior Part)US equity indexes On January 31–February 7, US equity indexes had the following correlations with US crude oil March futures: the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DIA): 20.5% the

  • Is US Crude Oil’s Journey to $60 Unstoppable?
    Market Realist4 months ago

    Is US Crude Oil’s Journey to $60 Unstoppable?

    Is US Crude Oil's Journey to $60 Unstoppable?EIA inventory data On February 6, the EIA (U.S. Energy Information Administration) reported a rise of 1.3 MMbbls (million barrels) in US crude oil inventories for the week that ended on February 1. A

  • Will Natural Gas Rise from Almost a Ten-Month Low?
    Market Realist4 months ago

    Will Natural Gas Rise from Almost a Ten-Month Low?

    Will Natural Gas Rise from Almost a Ten-Month Low?Natural gasOn February 5, natural gas March futures rose 0.1% and settled at $2.66 per MMBtu (million British thermal units)—the second-lowest closing level since April 19. However, with the EIA

  • Will US Crude Oil Maintain the $54 Level on February 5?
    Market Realist4 months ago

    Will US Crude Oil Maintain the $54 Level on February 5?

    Will US Crude Oil Maintain the $54 Level on February 5?US crude oilOn February 4, US crude oil prices fell 1.3% and settled at $54.56 per barrel. On the same day, US crude oil active futures made an intraday high of $55.75—the highest level since

  • What Pushed Energy ETFs Last Week?
    Market Realist4 months ago

    What Pushed Energy ETFs Last Week?

    Energy Sector: Key Highlights Last Week(Continued from Prior Part)US equity indexesOn January 25–February 1, US equity indexes ended in the green. The S&P Mid-Cap 400 (IVOO), the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DIA), and the S&P 500 Index

  • Analysts Might Have Helped Oil’s Rise
    Market Realist5 months ago

    Analysts Might Have Helped Oil’s Rise

    What Helped Your Energy Portfolio?(Continued from Prior Part)US equity indexesOn January 24–31, US equity indexes had the following correlations with US crude oil March futures:the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DIA): 74.4%the S&P 500 (SPY):

  • Natural Gas Is Heading for More than a Four-Month Low
    Market Realist5 months ago

    Natural Gas Is Heading for More than a Four-Month Low

    Natural Gas Is Heading for More than a Four-Month LowNatural gasOn January 30, at 6:05 AM EST, natural gas March futures fell 1.7% from the last closing level. The natural gas March futures were at $2.866 per MMBtu (million British thermal units).

  • Weakness in Wall Street and Oil Dragged on Energy ETFs
    Market Realist5 months ago

    Weakness in Wall Street and Oil Dragged on Energy ETFs

    Your Energy Review for the Week Ended January 25(Continued from Prior Part)US equity indexes Between January 18 and January 25, US equity indexes had mixed performances. The S&P Mid-Cap 400 (IVOO), the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DIA), and the

  • Why Wall Street Might Be Dominating Oil’s Moves
    Market Realist5 months ago

    Why Wall Street Might Be Dominating Oil’s Moves

    Why the Energy Portfolio Didn't Match Oil's Gains This Week(Continued from Prior Part)US equity indexesOn January 17–24, US equity indexes had the following correlations with US crude oil March futures:the S&P Mid-Cap 400 (IVOO): 95.6%the

  • Have Oil and Wall Street Moved Together?
    Market Realist5 months ago

    Have Oil and Wall Street Moved Together?

    Broader Market Supported the Energy Portfolio(Continued from Prior Part)US equity indexesOn January 10–17, US equity indexes had the following correlations with US crude oil March futures:the S&P 500 (SPY): 95.5%the Dow Jones Industrial

  • 6 Best Vanguard Index Funds for 2018 and Beyond
    Kiplinger5 months ago

    6 Best Vanguard Index Funds for 2018 and Beyond

    You can build a well-balanced portfolio with just six mutual funds--but which six and how much should you invest in each?

  • The EIA’s Inventory Data Could Fail to Propel Oil Prices
    Market Realist5 months ago

    The EIA’s Inventory Data Could Fail to Propel Oil Prices

    The EIA's Inventory Data Could Fail to Propel Oil PricesEIA inventory dataThe EIA (U.S. Energy Information Administration) reported a fall of 2.7 MMbbls (million barrels) in US crude oil inventories to 437.1 MMbbls in the week that ended on January

  • Is the Sharp Rise in Natural Gas Sustainable?
    Market Realist5 months ago

    Is the Sharp Rise in Natural Gas Sustainable?

    Is the Sharp Rise in Natural Gas Sustainable?Natural gasOn January 15, natural gas February futures fell 2.5% and settled at $3.50 per million British thermal units. On January 16, at 7:37 AM EST, natural gas prices have risen by 1.7 cents from the

  • Oil’s Rise Wasn’t the Only Driver of Energy’s Score Last Week
    Market Realist5 months ago

    Oil’s Rise Wasn’t the Only Driver of Energy’s Score Last Week

    Energy's Performance Last Week—and What's on the Agenda This Week (Continued from Prior Part) ## US equity indexes Between January 4 and January 11, US equity indexes rose. The S&P Mid-Cap 400 (IVOO), the S&P 500 Index (SPY), and the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DIA) rose 4.7%, 2.5%, and 2.4%, respectively. Energy stocks make up 5.1%, 5.9%, and 5.2% of these indexes, respectively. ## Oil, the broader market, and energy ETFs Last week, US crude oil February futures rose 7.6%, while the Energy Select Sector SPDR ETF (XLE) rose 3.6%. XLE rose the fourth-most among sector-specific SPDR ETFs. In addition to oil’s rise, broader market indexes may have had a significant role in XLE’s rise. Equity indexes have recovered due to China-US trade talks.  However, the factors we discussed in the previous article could be a concern for these equity indexes. Last week, the Industrial Select Sector SPDR ETF (XLI) rose 4.2%—the most among sector-specific SPDR ETFs. The Consumer Staples Select Sector SPDR ETF (XLP) rose 0.7%—the least among sector-specific SPDR ETFs in the week that ended on January 11. All sector-specific SPDR ETFs rose last week. ## Energy ETFs Last week, major energy subsector ETFs’ performances were as follows: * The VanEck Vectors Oil Services ETF (OIH) rose 7.8%. * The SPDR S&P Oil & Gas Exploration & Production ETF (XOP) rose 6.2%. * The VanEck Vectors Oil Refiners ETF (CRAK) rose 2.1%. * The Alerian MLP ETF (AMLP) rose 1.9%. The broader market’s and oil prices’ rises may also have been behind these energy ETFs’ rises last week. Continue to Next Part Browse this series on Market Realist: * Part 1 - The China Factor Could Drag on Oil This Week * Part 3 - These Upstream and Oilfield Stocks Outperformed Energy Last Week * Part 4 - A Look at the Biggest Falls in Energy Last Week

  • Broader Market Might Have Pushed Oil Higher
    Market Realist5 months ago

    Broader Market Might Have Pushed Oil Higher

    What's Impacting Your Energy Portfolio Gain? (Continued from Prior Part) ## US equity indexes On January 3–10, US equity indexes had the following correlations with US crude oil February futures: * the S&P Mid-Cap 400 (IVOO): -42.1% * the S&P 500 (SPY): -42% * the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DIA): -36% These three equity indexes have exposure of ~5.1%, ~5.9%, and ~5.2% to the energy sector, respectively. The equity indexes rose 8%, 6.1%, and 5.8%, respectively, in the trailing week. US crude oil February futures rose 11.7% during this period. ## Oil’s rise and equity indexes The correlations indicate an inverse relationship between oil and these US equity indexes. However, the rise in these equity indexes because of the US-China trade talks might have caused oil prices to rise. Last month, the fall in US equity indexes made oil fall sharper. On January 3–10, the Energy Select Sector SPDR ETF (XLE) rose 7.7%—the third-largest gainer among the SPDR ETFs that break the broad market into subsectors. The rise in US equity indexes might have helped XLE’s rise, which we discussed in the previous part. During this period, the Industrial Select Sector SPDR ETF (XLI) rose 8.2%. XLI was the outperformer among sector-based SPDR ETFs. The Consumer Staples Select Sector SPDR ETF (XLP) rose 2.6%—the lowest gainer among sector-based SPDR ETFs. All of the sector-based SPDR ETFs ended in the green in the seven calendar days to January 10. Next, we’ll discuss the important price level for US crude oil next week. Continue to Next Part Browse this series on Market Realist: * Part 1 - President Trump Might End Oil’s Gain * Part 2 - Wall Street’s Sentiments Boosted Energy ETFs * Part 4 - Where US Crude Oil Might Head Next Week

  • WTI Oil Could Stay above $50
    Market Realist5 months ago

    WTI Oil Could Stay above $50

    Did Trade Talks Impact Oil-Weighted Stocks More than Oil? ## US crude oil above $50 On January 9, US crude oil active futures settled at $52.36 per barrel—5.2% higher than the last closing level because of the US-China trade talks. On the same day, the S&P 500 Index (SPY), the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DIA), and the S&P Mid-Cap 400 (IVOO) rose 0.4%, 0.4%, and 0.9%, respectively. The rise in oil prices might be important for these equity indexes. ## $50 level On January 9, US crude oil prices were 5.7% and 3% below Goldman Sachs and the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s price forecast for 2019. So, oil bulls should be careful with their long position. However, oil’s implied volatility has fallen 20.9% in the trailing week—a positive development for oil prices. US oil production has started to show signs of a slowdown by the second quarter. With OPEC and non-OPEC members’ cut, the current supply scenario will likely change. The Brent-WTI spread moved above $9 on January 9—the highest level since December 19. The rebound in the Brent-WTI spread might signal easing oversupply concerns outside the US. ## Economic slowdown concerns However, concerns about a global economic slowdown could linger around oil prices. On January 9, the US 10-Year Treasury Constant Maturity Minus 3-Month Treasury Constant Maturity yield spread was at ~25 basis points— just 11 basis points above its lowest level since August 9, 2007. Investors’ demand for a longer-dated security compared to a shorter-dated security might be one of the reasons behind the contraction in the spread. In the last three decades, when the yield spread turned negative, a recession started the next year. Another contraction in the yield spread might increase the concerns about oil’s demand. Oil is a growth-driven asset, which is another problem for oil prices. Continue to Next Part Browse this series on Market Realist: * Part 2 - Did Trade Talks Impact Oil-Weighted Stocks More than Oil?

  • Will Natural Gas Stay above $3?
    Market Realist5 months ago

    Will Natural Gas Stay above $3?

    On January 8, natural gas February futures rose 0.8% and settled at $2.96 per million British thermal units. Until January 11, on the upside, the closing level of $3.14 could be important. On January 9, at 6:50 AM CST, natural gas prices crossed the $3 level.

  • Last Week in Review: Energy Outperforms Other Sectors
    Market Realist5 months ago

    Last Week in Review: Energy Outperforms Other Sectors

    What Happened in the Energy Sector Last Week (Continued from Prior Part) ## US equity indexes Between December 28 and January 4, US equity indexes rose—the S&P Mid-Cap 400 (IVOO), S&P 500 (SPY), and Dow Jones Industrial Average (DIA) rose 2.3%, 1.9%, and 1.6%, respectively. Energy stocks comprise 5.1%, 5.9%, and 5.2% of these indexes. ## Oil, broader market, and energy ETFs Last week, US crude oil February futures rose 5.8%, while the Energy Select Sector SPDR ETF (XLE) rose 4.9%. XLE rose the most among sector-specific SPDR ETFs. In addition to oil’s recovery, broader market indexes may have had a significant role in XLE’s rise. Equity indexes have recovered due to easing concerns of an economic slowdown. Last week, the Real Estate Select Sector SPDR (XLRE) fell 0.6%—the most among sector-specific SPDR ETFs. Most sector-specific SPDR ETFs rose last week. ## Energy ETFs Last week, major energy subsector ETFs’ performance was as follows: * The Alerian MLP ETF (AMLP) rose 9.3%. * The SPDR S&P Oil & Gas Exploration & Production ETF (XOP) rose 8.6%. * The VanEck Vectors Oil Services ETF (OIH) rose 7.6%. * The VanEck Vectors Oil Refiners ETF (CRAK) rose 3.1%. Broader markets’ and oil prices’ rise may also have been behind these energy ETFs’ increase last week. The Brent-WTI spread expanded by $1.22, a positive development for CRAK. CRAK has a ~32.3% exposure to US refining stocks. Continue to Next Part Browse this series on Market Realist: * Part 1 - What Goldman Sachs Thinks about Oil * Part 3 - Last Week’s Top Energy Stocks * Part 4 - Oil ETFs Rose More than Oil Last Week

  • Are Wall Street and Oil Moving in Opposite Directions?
    Market Realist5 months ago

    Are Wall Street and Oil Moving in Opposite Directions?

    Has Broader Market Limited Energy Sector's Upside? (Continued from Prior Part) ## US equity indexes Between December 27 and January 3, US equity indexes had the following correlations with US crude oil February futures: * the S&P Mid-Cap 400 (IVOO): -40.9% * the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DIA): -17.3% * the S&P 500 (SPY): -10% These three equity indexes have exposure of ~5.1%, ~5.2%, and ~5.9% to the energy sector, respectively. The equity indexes fell 1%, 2%, and 1.6%, respectively, in the trailing week. US crude oil February futures rose 5.6% during this period. ## Oil’s rise and equity indexes The correlations indicate a mild inverse relationship between oil and most of these US equity indexes. In fact, these equity indexes and oil returns moved inversely in the trailing week as shown in the graph above. Between December 27 and January 3, the Energy Select Sector SPDR ETF (XLE) rose 0.7%, the only rise among the SPDR ETFs that break the broad market into subsectors. The rise in oil might have helped XLE’s rise despite broader market weakness, which we discussed in the previous part. During this period, the Technology Select Sector SPDR ETF (XLK) fell 4.3% and is the underperformer on our list. Except XLE, the rest of the SPDR ETFs on our list ended in the red in the seven calendar days to January 3. Next, we’ll discuss the important price level for US crude oil next week. Continue to Next Part Browse this series on Market Realist: * Part 1 - Is a Solid Support Building for Oil? * Part 2 - Broader Market Might Have Limited the Upside in Energy ETFs * Part 4 - Next Week US Crude Oil Might Close between These Levels

  • Oil: Famous Recession Indicator Might Be a Concern
    Market Realist6 months ago

    Oil: Famous Recession Indicator Might Be a Concern

    How Oil-Weighted Stocks Performed Last QuarterRebound in oil prices On January 2, US crude oil active futures settled at $46.54 per barrel—2.5% higher than the last closing level due to short covering.

  • What Might Spook Natural Gas in Early 2019?
    Market Realist6 months ago

    What Might Spook Natural Gas in Early 2019?

    What Might Spook Natural Gas in Early 2019?Natural gas On December 31, natural gas February futures fell 11% and settled at $2.94 per million British thermal units. On January 1, the markets were closed for New Year’s Day.

  • Has Wall Street Boosted Energy ETFs despite Oil’s Weakness?
    Market Realist6 months ago

    Has Wall Street Boosted Energy ETFs despite Oil’s Weakness?

    On December 21–28, US equity indexes ended in the green. Last week, the S&P Mid-Cap 400 (IVOO), the S&P 500 (SPY), and the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DIA) rose 2.9%, 2.7%, and 2.2%, respectively. Energy stocks form ~5.1%, 5.9%, and 5.2%, respectively, of these equity indexes.

  • Why EIA Data Could Alarm Oil Bulls
    Market Realist6 months ago

    Why EIA Data Could Alarm Oil Bulls

    US crude oil inventories were unchanged at 441.4 MMbbls for the week ended December 21, based on the EIA’s report. A Reuters poll had suggested a potential fall of ~2.9 MMbbls.

  • Is Wall Street Impacting Oil Woes?
    Market Realist6 months ago

    Is Wall Street Impacting Oil Woes?

    On December 20–27, US equity indexes had the following correlations with US crude oil February futures: the S&P Mid-Cap 400 (IVOO): 88.4% the S&P 500 (SPY): 86.5% the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DIA): 86.5%