KC=F - Coffee Mar 20

NYBOT - NYBOT Real Time Price. Currency in USX
138.10
+0.85 (+0.62%)
As of 1:29PM EST. Market open.
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Pre. SettlementN/A
Settlement Date2020-03-19
Open135.20
Bid136.40
Last Price102.75
Day's Range123.20 - 127.65
Volume21,510
Ask136.50
  • 10 Countries with the Highest Coffee Consumption in the World
    Insider Monkey

    10 Countries with the Highest Coffee Consumption in the World

    Coffee will never go out of fashion, as evidenced by the 10 countries with the highest coffee consumption in the world. There is nothing better in the world than a hot, steaming cup of coffee to jolt you awake in the morning. Similarly, nothing comes close to coffee as you attempt to pull an all-nighter […]

  • Read this before you panic about a global coffee shortage
    MarketWatch

    Read this before you panic about a global coffee shortage

    The International Coffee Organization predicted worldwide coffee consumption would exceed production by 502,000 60-kilogram bags next year.

  • MarketWatch

    Coffee consumption will exceed production in the 2019/20 coffee year: ICO

    Coffee consumption will exceed production in the 2019 to 2020 coffee year, creating a global deficit of about 502,000 bags, the International Coffee Organization (ICO) said in its November report. "Despite a slowdown in growth, consumption is predicted to overtake production during the course of the year," said the report. Brazil's smaller off0year Arabica crop and bad weather in parts of Central America and Asia could continue to affect prices in the coming weeks," it said. "However, the impact of these factors may be muted due to the recent weakness of the Brazilian Real as well as the upcoming on-year crop in Brazil," it said. Coffee prices as measured by the ICO Composite Indicator remained above 100 cents/lb in November for the first time in the last 12 months, said the report. Global exports fell 13.4% to 8.91 million bags in October from the year-earlier period.

  • New Sustainability Report from S&D Coffee & Tea® Demonstrates Significant Progress
    PR Newswire

    New Sustainability Report from S&D Coffee & Tea® Demonstrates Significant Progress

    S&D; Coffee & Tea® has released its 2019 Sustainability Report, Rooted in Impact, summarizing efforts and progress made throughout 2017 and 2018. As the industry landscape continues to evolve, S&D; is committed to bringing effective sustainable solutions to the forefront of its business. The report highlights the company's role in creating real change across the supply chain.

  • Folgers® Mornings Get a Laugh-Out-Loud Makeover in a Highly Caffeinated and Highly Crafted New Ad Campaign from Publicis Groupe
    PR Newswire

    Folgers® Mornings Get a Laugh-Out-Loud Makeover in a Highly Caffeinated and Highly Crafted New Ad Campaign from Publicis Groupe

    Folgers® mornings just got a lot more real, and a lot more entertaining, in a hysterically modern take on the iconic notion that The Best Part of Wakin' Up Is Folgers in Your Cup®. Enter the new Folgers Choir – more formally known as the Folgers Morning Harmonizers -- a red satin-clad ensemble of seven men and women who randomly show up in the midst of difficult mornings, helping alleviate tension with both a smile and a steaming hot cup of Folgers® Coffee. The Folgers Choir is sure to brighten your morning, even if you just threw back the shower curtain on your father-in-law soaping up, got stuck in the middle seat in the worst carpool ever or witnessed an unsuccessful, but equally dramatic, Santa Claus entrance by dad.

  • BBC News

    'Sugar overload' warning for festive hot drinks

    Seasonal lattes and hot chocolates sold by coffee chains can contain up to 23 spoonfuls, a study finds.

  • Compare The Best Keurig, Nespresso & Breville Coffee Maker Cyber Monday 2019 Deals: Sales on Espresso Machines & Coffee Makers Reviewed by The Consumer Post
    PR Newswire

    Compare The Best Keurig, Nespresso & Breville Coffee Maker Cyber Monday 2019 Deals: Sales on Espresso Machines & Coffee Makers Reviewed by The Consumer Post

    Cyber Monday coffee maker deals are here. Experts at The Consumer Post have compared the best Jura, Keurig, Cuisinart and Breville deals for 2019 and are listing them below.

  • Harvest Slowdown Brews Up Higher Coffee Prices
    The Wall Street Journal

    Harvest Slowdown Brews Up Higher Coffee Prices

    The price of coffee has jumped more than 25% in recent weeks, lifted by signs of shrinking production in Latin America.

  • PR Newswire

    Global Ready to Drink (RTD) Tea & Coffee Market by Product, Additives, Packaging, Price Segment, Distribution Channel & Region - Forecast to 2024

    The "Ready to Drink Tea and Coffee Market: Global Industry Trends, Share, Size, Growth, Opportunity and Forecast 2019-2024" report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com's offering.

  • Why are humans so bad at predicting the future?
    Quartz

    Why are humans so bad at predicting the future?

    If you have a few thousand dollars to spare and tire of investing in index funds, you might try something a bit more speculative: the futures market. Here, investors can use their money to buy a commodity (say, gold or coffee) at a future date at a pre-arranged price. If the price goes up between the initial investment and that date, the investor keeps the profits; if it goes down, they lose the money they started with.

  • A $15.80 Cafe Latte Highlights Shrinking Supply of Premium Beans
    Bloomberg

    A $15.80 Cafe Latte Highlights Shrinking Supply of Premium Beans

    (Bloomberg) -- The world is flooded with coffee, but it’s mostly boring beans. For the hand-crafted, artisanal specialty brews, you have to pay up.Cheap coffee has forced some growers to exit the business, while others are selling their product at a loss, leaving less money to invest in rarer, more-expensive beans. That means varieties favored by some high-end suppliers like Stumptown Coffee Roaster or Nestle SA’s Blue Bottle are surging in price -- and that’s reaching consumers.Scott Beard, a West Virginia-based music teacher and baritone, recently got sticker shock when a cafe latte he bought while traveling in Paris cost him $15.80 at a high-end hotel. He might have gotten a bargain. A bag of Elida Estate Panama Geisha roasted by Dragonfly Coffee Roasters recently set an auction record at $1,029 a pound.“There’s a lot of coffee in the world, but not the good stuff,” said Peter Roberts, a professor at Emory University’s Goizueta Business School.U.S. retail prices for high-end coffee surged 24% while their lower-end cousins rose 7% in the four years ended in mid-June 2018, according to data tracked by Roberts. Over the same time, the benchmark contract on ICE Futures U.S. in New York plunged 33%. The drop for futures means most farmers are getting paid about $1 a pound, or less, for regular beans.Low prices means production is falling in areas that specialize in premium beans such as Costa Rica, El Salvador and Guatemala.Buyers are feeling the pinch. Milwaukee-based Colectivo raised prices recently amid increased demand, according to Al Liu, the 21-store chain’s vice president of coffee.“The demand for that coffee isn’t just coming from North America and Europe,” he said. “Buyers in East Asia have kind of come out of left field, and said ‘Hey, we’re willing to pay top dollar.’”‘Two-Way Street’Despite the depressed commodity cost, Colectivo is paying farmers similar prices to what beans fetched in previous years in a bid to encourage production. “You might be able to save quite a bit of money when the market is down, but that may not endear you to suppliers -- this is a two-way street,” Liu said.Only about 15% of the world’s coffee falls into the specialty category, said Ric Rhinehart, executive director emeritus at the Specialty Coffee Association. Given that producers tend to plant both ordinary and gourmet beans, low benchmark prices mean they can’t afford investments in specialty trees, machinery or fertilizers.Take the case of Carlos Batres, a fifth-generation coffee grower in El Salvador. He was the first producer in the world to produce the specialty pacamara variety in the 1980s. His beans can fetch a premium of as much as 300% over benchmark prices.Producing the variety requires meticulous care and labor. Batres is lucky to have started his specialty business more than three decades ago. It’s unfathomable to think he’d be able to make the switch at current prices.“We do everything we can: cut only the ripe cherries, make sure they are shade grown, place windbreakers so the plant isn’t hurt. Everything is done by hand,” said the 66-year-old farmer. He estimates El Salvador is now producing about 10% of what it did at its peak in 1979.“We would not be able to survive if we were paid the exchange prices,” he said.Meanwhile, demand has never been stronger. The New York-based National Coffee Association estimates the share of gourmet coffee consumed by Americans reached a new high at 61%.It’s easy to see why consumption is growing -- by some measures, coffee has never tasted better. The Elida Estate Panama Geisha variety from Dragonfly Coffee Roasters, the java that set an auction record, also got the highest ever tasting score from Coffee Review, an industry benchmark.“Production will start to fall off if coffee farmers aren’t able to make a sustainable living,” said Tamas Christman, the founder and chief executive officer of Boulder, Colorado-based Dragonfly. The specialty varieties can help in “getting people to understand it’s worth more than what the commodity market is giving it,” he said.Part of the problem is that many suppliers and buyers are basing their prices off of the New York futures market, which Roberts of Emory University call the “elephant” in the room.Some growers in Mexico and Central America are switching to food crops like corn because of the sustained price slump, said Michael Sheridan, the director of sourcing and shared value at Chicago-based Intelligentsia Coffee, a chain of boutique coffee shops.“Most of the risk goes to the people who can least afford to bear it, who are the growers,” Sheridan said. “Growers are not just facing a price risk, they’re facing an acute threat from climate change. The odds are more stacked against growers today than they were during that last price crisis.”\--With assistance from Millie Munshi.To contact the reporters on this story: Marvin G. Perez in New York at mperez71@bloomberg.net;Leslie Patton in Chicago at lpatton5@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: James Attwood at jattwood3@bloomberg.net, Millie Munshi, Reg GaleFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • The world’s caffeine supply faces an existential threat
    Quartz

    The world’s caffeine supply faces an existential threat

    Though coffee is grown nearly everywhere, from South America to Africa to Asia, scientists worry that nearly half of this land won’t be able to generate harvests by 2050—impacting not only the price of coffee, but the livelihood of nations.

  • The coffee conundrum: consumption is up but trade prices are low
    AFP

    The coffee conundrum: consumption is up but trade prices are low

    Despite a steady increase in coffee consumption around the world, trade prices have fallen dramatically in the past three years, hitting producers. This is largely because of bumper harvests in Brazil, the world's main coffee producer. The crisis in prices is beginning to create "real structural problems" for producers, said Valeria Rodriguez, a manager at fairtrade organisation Max Havelaar France.

  • Starbucks set to open showcase Reserve Roastery in Chicago (PHOTOS)
    American City Business Journals

    Starbucks set to open showcase Reserve Roastery in Chicago (PHOTOS)

    The massive new Starbucks store opening Friday is the company's largest coffee outpost in the world.

  • COT: Trade Hopes Cut Demand for Gold; Oil Bought Again.
    FX Empire

    COT: Trade Hopes Cut Demand for Gold; Oil Bought Again.

    COT on commodities in week to November 5 showed how trade hopes and weather developments drove position changes from oil and natural gas to gold and coffee

  • Starbucks has failed in South Africa so far but is set for a do over
    Quartz

    Starbucks has failed in South Africa so far but is set for a do over

    Just three years ago, residents of the Rosebank neighborhood of Johannesburg were buzzing around the launch of the first Starbucks store in sub-Saharan Africa. While it was never expected to be a mainstream brand in a country with 57% poverty and harsh inequality, Starbucks South Africa has still managed to perform worse than many watchers expected. Taste Holdings, the Johannesburg-based company that franchised the Starbucks brand exclusively in South Africa, said it is selling all its food brands after concluding it can’t source the capital to make the coffee stores break even.

  • It’s now possible to get lost at the new “mega MoMA.” That’s a good thing
    Quartz

    It’s now possible to get lost at the new “mega MoMA.” That’s a good thing

    New York's MoMA has reopened and it's a whole new experience.

  • What's the Best Way to Store Coffee Beans?
    Consumer Reports

    What's the Best Way to Store Coffee Beans?

    The best way to store your coffee beans and keep them fresh depends on how soon you plan to use them. Coffee is hygroscopic, meaning it absorbs moisture, odors, and flavors from the surrounding a...

  • Vietnam domestic coffee prices hit four-month lows; trading thin in Indonesia
    Reuters

    Vietnam domestic coffee prices hit four-month lows; trading thin in Indonesia

    HANOI/BANDAR LAMPUNG (Reuters) - Vietnam's domestic coffee prices fell to four-month lows this week, tracking international prices, while trading was thin in Indonesia at the end of its main harvest season, traders said on Thursday. Farmers in the Central Highlands, Vietnam's largest coffee-growing area, sold coffee at 30,000 dong ($1.29) per kg on Thursday, according to traders. January robusta coffee settled down $24, or 1.9%, at $1,240 per tonne on Wednesday.

  • Stir crazy - coffee for one for Japan captain Leitch
    AFP

    Stir crazy - coffee for one for Japan captain Leitch

    Japan's rugby captain Michael Leitch has discovered a frustrating drawback to the side's storming World Cup run -- he can't pop out for a quiet coffee anymore. Coffee lover Leitch, who has led the Brave Blossoms to three wins out of three so far, can't leave Japan's team hotel without being mobbed by autograph-hunting fans. The marauding flanker, whose face adorns billboards all over Tokyo, recently finished second to Prime Minister Shinzo Abe in a poll of Japan's most recognised public figures.

  • Trading in Vietnam stays dull as market awaits new season supply
    Reuters

    Trading in Vietnam stays dull as market awaits new season supply

    HANOI/BANDAR LAMPUNG (Reuters) - Coffee trading in Vietnam remained lacklustre this week as stockpiles dwindled and supply from the new season is unlikely to be available in around a month. Farmers in the Central Highlands, Vietnam's largest coffee-growing area, sold coffee at 34,000 dong ($1.47) per kg on Thursday, slightly lower than a week ago. Traders in Vietnam offered 5% black and broken grade 2 robusta at $180-$200 premium per tonne to the November contract on Thursday, unchanged from a week ago.

  • Where to get free coffee and java deals Sunday for National Coffee Day
    USA TODAY

    Where to get free coffee and java deals Sunday for National Coffee Day

    Sept. 29 is National Coffee Day, and businesses are toasting the made-up holiday by giving away free coffee and serving up discounted brew.