LC=F - Live Cattle Apr 20

CME - CME Delayed Price. Currency in USX
107.475
-3.000 (-2.72%)
At close: 2:05PM EST
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Pre. SettlementN/A
Settlement Date2020-04-30
Open108.400
Bid107.000
Last Price110.475
Day's Range107.475 - 110.000
Volume44,239
Ask107.475
  • ACM Noms Led by Maren Morris, Dan + Shay, Thomas Rhett; Keith Urban Set to Host
    Variety

    ACM Noms Led by Maren Morris, Dan + Shay, Thomas Rhett; Keith Urban Set to Host

    Maren Morris, Dan + Shay and Thomas Rhett were among the top nominees announced Thursday morning for the Academy of Country Music Awards, to air live from Las Vegas on CBS April 5. Keith Urban was additionally announced Thursday as a first-time host for the show. It was expected that last spring's ACMs host, Reba […]

  • Indian birdwatchers warn that almost all local birds are dying out
    Quartz

    Indian birdwatchers warn that almost all local birds are dying out

    For millennia, birds have been inherently intertwined in Indian culture, playing prominent roles in mythology, religion, art, and other aspects of human life. A new comprehensive report on the state of India’s birds, released at the 13th Conference of Parties to the Convention on Migratory Species in Gandhinagar held between Feb. 15-22, reveals that most Indian birds have been declining, particularly raptors such as vultures and eagles. The overall health of Indian birds has been unknown because research tends to focus on a handful of bird species, typically those that are larger, more threatened and charismatic.

  • Bloomberg

    Clouds of Black Smoke Darken South Sudan’s Growing Oil Profits

    (Bloomberg) -- Crude oil, key to boosting South Sudan’s economy, is destroying crucial pasture land, polluting water, and increasing birth defects. Now it’s finally bad enough for the government to take notice.Grass is black from oil spills, air is dark from pillars of black smoke and layers of “black gold” cover water supplies.Mitigating the pollution in the East African northern crude-producing regions has been made a top priority and an audit is underway to locate contaminated areas and find ways to clean it up, according to Petroleum Minister Awow Daniel Chuang. “Regulations will be used to save the environment; the policy will be for zero discharge,” he said in Juba this month.Likely to both boost this initiative and allow the state to focus on rebuilding the economy is the breakthrough this week in long-running peace talks after years of civil war. President Salva Kiir and opposition leader Riek Machar agreed to form a coalition government, bringing peace to war-stricken, oil-rich South Sudan. Machar is due to be named Kiir’s deputy on Friday.David Gai, a former information minister in what is now Unity state, said negligence and failure to inspect pipelines in a timely fashion is at the root of much of the problem.Company failures to enclose production sites is also a threat, said Abraham Ngor, a former state official in Ruweng region. “The government has issued precautionary warnings to people to avoid living near these areas,” he added.Birth defects are also a “big issue” for communities in his region but little details are available. “Investigations will help to find the exact cause,” Ngor said.New ExplorationOil production is key to development in the world’s newest country that seceded from Sudan in 2011.It’s currently producing as much as 166,000 barrels a day, according to a government report released Thursday. That compares with output of about 350,000 barrels before war broke out in 2013. More than five years of fighting claimed almost 400,000 lives, forced 4 million others from their homes and caused an economic crisis. Previous attempts to implement peace agreements had failed.Despite the environment damage, the government is pressing ahead with plans to boost sales by increasing buyers and encouraging international investment. The country has announced plans to offer 14 oil exploration blocks during the first quarter of this year as it seeks new sources of production. Foreign companies operating in the region include Malaysia’s Petroliam Nasional Berhad and China National Petroleum Corp.“We are trying to increase transparency in the country’s oil and gas sector, specifically concerning the financial aspects,” Chuang said in Thursday’s ministry report. “It is our responsibility to make sure that we clean up the environment, we will not be able to clean up the environment until we understand the extent of the damages in the three operating areas.”Residents of Rubkhona in Unity state, where oil spills go on for weeks, are concerned that the contamination is putting their families and their livestock at risk.“My children, wife and me, we are all at risk,” said Nicholas Lual, a 47-year-old cattle farmer. “My plan is to move away from here to a better place.”To contact the reporter on this story: Okech Francis in Juba at fokech@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Gordon Bell at gbell16@bloomberg.net, Gwen Ackerman, Gordon Bell, Chris KayFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Apple Pay is on pace to account for 10% of all global card transactions
    Quartz

    Apple Pay is on pace to account for 10% of all global card transactions

    Apple’s mobile wallet is gobbling up a growing chunk of card payments around the world. As the service grows, it’s becoming a greater challenge to rivals like PayPal and attracting the attention of competition watchdogs. Apple Pay accounts for about 5% of global card transactions and is on pace to handle 1-in-10 such payments by 2025, according to recent trend data compiled by Bernstein, a research firm.

  • Exclusive: Germany's Volkswagen and Daimler push for more 'sustainable' Chile lithium
    Reuters

    Exclusive: Germany's Volkswagen and Daimler push for more 'sustainable' Chile lithium

    German automakers Volkswagen and Daimler have launched a study to push for more "sustainable" lithium mining in Chile, according to lobbyist filings reviewed by Reuters, a sign of growing supply chain concerns ahead of an expected electric vehicle boom. Chile's Atacama salt flat is by far the biggest source of supply of the ultralight battery metal in South America's so-called "lithium triangle." The region, whose fragile ecosystem relies on a limited water supply, is home to the globe's top two producers, U.S.-based Albemarle Corp and Chile's SQM .

  • Reuters

    U.S. ethanol woes spur new animal food focus for Green Plains -CEO

    Green Plains Inc, one of the biggest U.S. ethanol producers, is planning to flip its business model upside down to survive a crash in prices for the corn-based fuel. The company will invest some $400 million in the next two to three years at its 13 plants to make high-protein, corn-based animal feeds its new flagship product, relegating ethanol to a low-margin byproduct. The plan upends the company's years-long strategy of pumping out the fuel and selling off the remnants as a low-quality feed known as distillers dried grains (DDGS) for cows and pigs.

  • Energy Emissions Stall as Rich Nations Kick Their Coal Habit
    Bloomberg

    Energy Emissions Stall as Rich Nations Kick Their Coal Habit

    (Bloomberg) -- Global emissions from energy held steady in 2019 for the first time in three years. But the restraint all came from the U.S. and Europe as developing countries boosted use of the most polluting fossil fuels.The findings from the International Energy Agency show energy-related carbon dioxide emissions remained at a record 33.3 billion tons. While industrial countries cut pollution levels to the lowest since 1993, the developing world led by India and China offset those declines.The result leave a glimmer of hope that policy makers can contain the greenhouse gases damaging the atmosphere. That would require China, which is the biggest polluter, and India, whose emissions are growing rapidly, to embrace the economy-wide limits that European countries are adopting. Scientists say increasing heat waves and more violent storms are likely without rapid cuts in greenhouse gases.“This welcome halt in emissions growth is grounds for optimism that we can tackle the climate challenge this decade,” Fatih Birol, IEA executive director, said in a statement. “We now need to work hard to make sure that 2019 is remembered as a definitive peak in global emissions, not just another pause in growth.”Burning coal, oil and natural gas accounts for the bulk of the greenhouse-gas pollution. Other activities such as raising livestock and deforestation contribute smaller amounts.A separate study from the World Meteorological Organization indicated an unprecedented warming of the planet is on the way in the next decade because of building carbon concentrations in the atmosphere. Global temperatures are already consistently breaking records, with 2016 the warmest ever followed by 2019, the United Nations agency said.The IEA report shows a divergence in policy between industrial and developing nations. While lawmakers are pushing toward a goal to zero out fossil fuel emissions in the EU, Asian nations, especially China and India, are continuing to burn more coal.U.S. President Donald Trump wants to scrap more environmental limits, but market forces in that nation are pricing out coal as a power generation fuel.More difficult to control are the emissions given off by catastrophic wildfires seen from the Amazon to Sydney and California. Research showed that the fires that swept Australia have probably doubled the nation’s annual greenhouse-gas emissions, producing as much climate-damaging pollution as all the airplanes in the world.The emissions being pumped into the air now will linger for decades to come. Global temperatures have already risen about 1 degree Celsius since the start of the industrial revolution, marking the quickest shift in the climate since the last ice age ended some 10,000 years ago. Envoys to the UN’s annual climate talks are looking at how to limit global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius, the most ambitious target in the Paris Agreement.Emissions in numbers:The U.S. reduced emissions by 2.9%, led by a 15% drop in coal power as cheap natural gas eroded its market share and milder weather subdued overall electricity demand.The EU lowered emissions by 5%, with three quarters of that coming from the power sector increasing renewables and switching from coal to gas. Emissions from Japan fell 4.3%, the most since 2009, as output from recently restarted nuclear reactors climbed.Despite the stagnation, global emissions still matched a record high set in 2018. Asia accounted for about 80% of the increase from the developing world. Coal demand there remains robust, particularly in Southeast Asia.China’s emissions rose but were tempered by slowing economic growth and gains in renewable energy and nuclear power. India saw a slight reduction in power-sector emissions that were offset by increases from transport.(Updates with context from the first paragraph.)\--With assistance from Rob Verdonck.To contact the reporters on this story: Dan Murtaugh in Singapore at dmurtaugh@bloomberg.net;Jeremy Hodges in London at jhodges17@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Ramsey Al-Rikabi at ralrikabi@bloomberg.net, Reed Landberg, Jonathan TironeFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Reuters

    In fire-hit rural Australia, climate debate burns deep

    Returning from a morning feeding his sheep, Jeff McCole, a 70-year-old farmer, paused to take in the bittersweet scene – a few droplets of rain falling onto the remains of his fire-ravaged home. Seasonal bushfires have struck Australia in a way like never before, making for months of monster blazes and toxic haze, and fuelling a polarizing debate over climate change. Climate change was "a load of crap", said McCole, an idea pushed by city folk with "no experience in the bush" and no understanding of Australia's punishing, cyclical climate.

  • French lenders bankroll firms linked to deforestation: analysis
    AFP

    French lenders bankroll firms linked to deforestation: analysis

    French banks have provided almost two billion euros of financial backing to agribusiness groups implicated in deforestation despite a law preventing firms from funding environmental damage, according to new analysis seen by AFP. Three years after France adopted landmark legislation compelling companies to identify and prevent human rights abuses and nature degradation throughout their supply chain, the analysis showed how large lenders nonetheless financed projects linked to deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon, the Congo Basin and Papua New Guinea. The investigation conducted by watchdog Global Witness concluded that BNP Paribas, Natixis and Credit Agricole "all have policies or commitments in place on agricultural commodities which are at risk of causing deforestation".

  • USD/CNY Price Forecast – Despite Short-term Weakness, Outlook for USD/CNY Remains Bullish
    FX Empire

    USD/CNY Price Forecast – Despite Short-term Weakness, Outlook for USD/CNY Remains Bullish

    The odds still favor an eventual bullish reversal for USD/CNY and resumption of the breakout of the falling trend channel that occurred on Monday.

  • Oil Price Forecast – Oil Only Showing Minor Signs of Possible Bottom So Far
    FX Empire

    Oil Price Forecast – Oil Only Showing Minor Signs of Possible Bottom So Far

    Oil struggles to confirm a bottom on a daily time frame, while intraday there are small signs of improvement starting to emerge.

  • Natural Gas Price Fundamental Daily Forecast – Direction Will Be Determined by Trader Reaction to $1.881 Pivot
    FX Empire

    Natural Gas Price Fundamental Daily Forecast – Direction Will Be Determined by Trader Reaction to $1.881 Pivot

    The price action suggests that traders are expecting a lighter-than-average withdrawal in this week’s U.S. Energy Information Administration’s Weekly Storage report.

  • Crude Oil Price Update – Supported by Expected OPEC+ Cuts; China Tariff Reduction
    FX Empire

    Crude Oil Price Update – Supported by Expected OPEC+ Cuts; China Tariff Reduction

    A technical committee advising OPEC and its allies led by Russia, known as OPEC+, has agreed to recommend a provisional additional cut in oil output of 600,000 barrels per day (bpd)

  • Meet the mechanical engineer who left Boeing to make plant-based chicken
    Quartz

    Meet the mechanical engineer who left Boeing to make plant-based chicken

    Christie Lagally spent much of her childhood peering into the dark through the lens of a telescope. Lagally came of age at the tail end of the Cold War, during the period when the US was entering the Gulf War in the Middle East, at a time when Los Angeles was overwhelmed by race riots, and when Bill Clinton was president. The kid who gazed into the night sky and revered Star Trek’s captain Kathryn Janeway grew up to manage a $10 million research and development effort for Boeing’s 777X wing manufacturing unit.

  • Stacking Fasts: Inside the Crypto Community’s New Diet Craze
    Coindesk

    Stacking Fasts: Inside the Crypto Community’s New Diet Craze

    The Bitcoin Fasting Group skips breakfast, lunch and dinner. It’s not as bad as it sounds.

  • A giant kettle of vultures has encrusted a CBP radio tower at the US-Mexico border in feces and vomit
    Quartz

    A giant kettle of vultures has encrusted a CBP radio tower at the US-Mexico border in feces and vomit

    A US Customs and Border Protection (CBP) radio tower near the Texas-Mexico border has become home to some 300 vultures, which have coated the structure’s entire surface, both inside and out, as well as the ground below, in “droppings mixed with urine,” according to a request for information the agency issued to vendors this week. A smoothly-functioning communications network is essential for CBP officers to do their jobs. The agencies under the aegis of the Department of Homeland Security, of which CBP is one, have suffered from radio problems in the past.

  • USA TODAY

    Economy added disappointing 145,000 jobs in December and the unemployment rate was unchanged at 3.5%

    Employers added 145,000 jobs in December. Economists had forecast 160,000.

  • Fire-hit Australian farmers vow to rise from the ashes
    AFP

    Fire-hit Australian farmers vow to rise from the ashes

    Steve Bellchambers is digging pits to bury the carcasses of livestock killed by bushfires which swept through his farm in Batlow, New South Wales. Bellchambers lost his home and many of his animals -- some he was forced to shoot to end their suffering from burns. Australia's months-long bushfire disaster has scorched more than eight million hectares (80,000 square kilometres/30,000 square miles) of land -- an area about the size of Ireland or South Carolina.

  • Impossible Foods’ plant-based pork puts it a step closer to China
    Quartz

    Impossible Foods’ plant-based pork puts it a step closer to China

    Impossible Foods is supplying plant-based pork for the fast-food chain, creating a testing ground before the company goes after markets in China.

  • Coal plunge sends U.S. emissions lower — but the rest of the economy still pollutes
    MarketWatch

    Coal plunge sends U.S. emissions lower — but the rest of the economy still pollutes

    With coal in decline, U.S. greenhouse-gas emissions have been reduced by about 13% over roughly the past decade-plus, falling an estimated 2% in 2019 alone, according to a report from energy-research firm Rhodium Group.

  • How to talk about Modi with your boss
    Quartz

    How to talk about Modi with your boss

    Indians just can’t stand people whose political opinions are different from theirs—be it on Twitter or inside a billion-dollar company. Such a conundrum abruptly surfaced at a unicorn yesterday (Jan. 6): Tech billionaire Sridhar Vembu was called a “fascist” and a Nazi on Twitter over his plans to attend a Feb. 2 event organised by the Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh (RSS), the parent organisation of prime minister Narendra Modi’s Hindu nationalist Bharatiya Janata Party. Several commentators even sought a boycott of his company, Zoho, a software service provider based in southern India’s Chennai.

  • All the ways the world made it harder to be a good person in 2019
    Quartz

    All the ways the world made it harder to be a good person in 2019

    As we head into a new year, and start a new decade, here’s a look back at Quartz’s coverage of how the world got a little more complicated this year.

  • In a Himalayan Indian village, “leopards escort humans safely”
    Quartz

    In a Himalayan Indian village, “leopards escort humans safely”

    In densely populated countries like India, people and wildlife often share the same space. Snow leopards depend on the same pastures as the people of Ladakh and Spiti. Tigers descend from the forests of the Mishmi hills to the valleys where Mishmi villages are located in search of food.

  • The Wall Street Journal

    Oil on an Upswing, Looking Ahead to 2020 --- Energy Journal

    As 2020 approaches, oil is on an upswing. Brent crude oil is up 7.5% so far this month, after the OPEC+ alliance committed to deeper production cuts, and as the U.S. and China make progress toward a ‘Phase One’ trade deal. Two energy-related themes emerge from the collection of stories: The U.S. oil and gas boom made possible by fracking and the global business community’s pursuit of ways to reduce carbon emissions while meeting a growing consumer demand for climate-friendly products.

  • A solution to Delhi’s apocalyptic winters might just be in sight
    Quartz

    A solution to Delhi’s apocalyptic winters might just be in sight

    While fossil fuel-based power plants and vehicles are the major scourges in other countries, or even other Indian cities, Delhi’s problem lies a few hundred kilometres northwest: the agricultural fields of Punjab and Haryana. Every year in late September and October, Indian farmers in those states set fire to straw stubble following the harvest of grains like paddy and wheat. Air pollution due to stubble burning has economic costs as well.