LEVI - Levi Strauss & Co.

NYSE - NYSE Delayed Price. Currency in USD
20.00
+0.02 (+0.10%)
At close: 4:04PM EST

20.00 0.00 (0.00%)
After hours: 4:19PM EST

Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous Close19.98
Open19.86
Bid19.92 x 1000
Ask19.96 x 1100
Day's Range19.58 - 20.04
52 Week Range16.00 - 24.50
Volume1,351,975
Avg. Volume924,840
Market Cap7.854B
Beta (5Y Monthly)N/A
PE Ratio (TTM)19.90
EPS (TTM)1.00
Earnings DateJan 29, 2020
Forward Dividend & Yield0.60 (3.00%)
Ex-Dividend DateOct 01, 2019
1y Target Est23.14
  • Trump Takes Suddenly Sunny View on European Trade From Davos
    Bloomberg

    Trump Takes Suddenly Sunny View on European Trade From Davos

    (Bloomberg) -- Terms of Trade is a daily newsletter that untangles a world embroiled in trade wars. Sign up here. President Donald Trump came to Davos espousing his economic and trade policies as models for the world, sending some warm and some mixed messages to European nations that have endured his tariff threats on everything from cars to Camembert for almost three years.Before arriving in the Swiss resort Tuesday, Trump and French President Emmanuel Macron had declared a temporary truce in their dispute over a French tax on foreign tech companies that drew threats of tariffs from Washington. Just last week, French officials were all but certain that the levies were imminent.Then, in his remarks kicking off the World Economic Forum’s annual meeting in the Alps, Trump said he looked forward to “negotiating a tremendous new deal with the United Kingdom. They have a wonderful new prime minister and wants very much to make a deal.”Later, he acknowledged that European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen is known as a “very tough negotiator, which is bad news for us, because we’re going to talk about a big trade deal.” A U.S.-European Union deal is “something we all want to be able to make,” Trump said, and there won’t be any problem requiring auto tariffs “if they’re fair.”For a president who’s railed against the gaping trade surpluses that European nations enjoy with the U.S., his was an uncommonly peaceful visit to a conclave of doubters about American exceptionalism.Standing on a stage of business and government leaders, Trump recited a litany of domestic accomplishments, from record-low minority unemployment in the U.S. to the growth in jobs for millennials. Among the international achievements mentioned was phase one of a trade deal signed with China last week. That agreement cools tensions between the world’s two largest economies, but its timing has revived concern from Berlin to Brussels that he’ll turn its sights next the European Union. Trump’s prepared remarks contained no such threats, ending on his optimism that Europe’s “teeming centers of commerce and culture” would rise again, including France’s fire-ravaged Notre Dame cathedral.“The great bells will once again ring out for all to hear, giving glory to God and filling millions with wonder and awe,” he said.In the backdrop of Trump’s cordial appearance was the stark reality that starting trade negotiations is easy to discuss and harder to actually do.Talks with the EU have stalled since 2018, as the European Commission leadership changed hands and the U.S. argued unsuccessfully for more access to agriculture markets. Relations started to sour that year, when the Trump administration invoked national-security considerations to impose tariffs on steel and aluminum from Europe, which retaliated with levies on iconic American brands such as Harley-Davidson Inc. motorcycles and Levi Strauss & Co. jeans.Given Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s short timetable, only a limited U.S. agreement with the U.K. is likely this year. The truce with France merely puts the digital-tax negotiations on an unclear, lengthly timetable at the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development.Still, the past two days have represented a partial retreat from his favorite negotiating tactic: a threat of tariffs.Details of his latest cease fire -- with Macron -- remain murky. Trump thanked the French leader when asked about it in Davos, but did not reveal the specifics of what they agreed to. “We had a very good conversation, it worked out very well, the U.S. is very happy with the result and we appreciate very much what President Macron did,” Trump said.Trump said his meeting with von der Leyen would be largely about trade. For her part, von der Leyen stressed the joint history of the countries and added only: “We have issues to discuss and we will negotiate.”Trump met with the Swiss president, and extolled the virtues of trade, before thanking Macron. Trump’s speech also hailed America’s surging oil and gas production, and called on Europe to wean itself from “unfriendly” suppliers, likely a veiled rebuke of Russia.“With an abundance of American natural gas now available, our European allies no longer have to be vulnerable to unfriendly energy suppliers either. We urge our friends in Europe to use America’s vast supply and achieve true energy security,” he said in his speech.As the auto-tariff threat simmers, German Chancellor Angela Merkel is among the high-profile attendees at Davos. She and Trump are not scheduled to meet.So when the day neared an end, Trump demonstrated again that he’ll play hardball, even with allies.Speaking to reporters, he said he’s confident he can reach a trade deal with the EU but will strongly consider imposing tariffs on European cars without an agreement. “If we’re unable to make a deal we will have to do something because we’ve been treated very badly as a country for many many years on trade,” Trump said.(Adds existing tariffs in 10th paragraph.)\--With assistance from Shawn Donnan.To contact the reporter on this story: Josh Wingrove in Washington at jwingrove4@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Margaret Collins at mcollins45@bloomberg.net, ;Alex Wayne at awayne3@bloomberg.net, Brendan Murray, Ana MonteiroFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Macron, Trump May Have Tariff Truce in 2020 Digital Tax Spat
    Bloomberg

    Macron, Trump May Have Tariff Truce in 2020 Digital Tax Spat

    (Bloomberg) -- Terms of Trade is a daily newsletter that untangles a world embroiled in trade wars. Sign up here. Presidents Emmanuel Macron and Donald Trump agreed to a truce in their dispute over digital taxes that will mean neither France nor the U.S. will impose punitive tariffs this year.Macron said on Monday he had a “great discussion” with Trump on the issue, without giving details.“We will work together on a good agreement to avoid tariff escalation,” he said on Twitter.“Excellent!” Trump said in a reply to Macron’s post, without providing additional information. Trump is en route to Davos, Switzerland, for the World Economic Forum.A White House readout of the call was notably more muted, saying only that the “two leaders agreed it is important to complete successful negotiations on the digital services tax” and “discussed other bilateral issues.” And neither a White House spokesman nor officials with the U.S. Trade Representative’s office would confirm that the U.S. president had called off his announced tariffs.Still, the possible respite may defuse transatlantic tensions that had been building between Washington and Brussels along another potential trade war front. Last week, Trump signed a cease-fire with China in phase one of a broader deal aimed at balancing trade between the world’s two largest economies.The European Union is an even bigger U.S. trading partner than China and supply chains between the two economies, particularly in automotive and financial services industries, are intertwined in ways that would make a tit-for-tat tariff dispute even more harmful to the world economy.Macron’s government still hopes to find a solution that fits within discussions at the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development’s work on the issue, according to a French official who asked not to be identified in line with government rules.European finance ministers meeting in Brussels Tuesday will discuss progress of the OECD talks. While the OECD is still working on its proposal for taxing tech companies around the world, France pushed ahead with its own levy last year that hit U.S. internet giants like Google, Apple Inc. and Amazon.com Inc.“We now have an agreement between the two presidents to avoid any tariff escalation and avoid any trade war,” French Finance Minister Bruno Le Maire told reporters in Brussels before the meeting. “It’s remains a difficult negotiation -- with digital tax, the devil is in the details and we need to resolve the details.”Paris and Washington have discussed the possibility of France suspending the collection of the digital tax payments due in April as long as the U.S. refrains from imposing new tariffs, French officials said. But that wouldn’t constitute a withdrawal of the levy, they added. For its part, the French government denies its national tax is discriminatory and warned that the EU would retaliate if the U.S. imposed additional levies.The U.S. has said that the French tax discriminates against American technology companies, citing Section 301 of a 1974 American law that Trump has thus far reserved to justify tariffs against China. That opened the door to the U.S.’s threat to hit $2.4 billion of French goods with tariffs in retaliation.Among the French products targeted with duties of as much as 100% were luxury items like wine, cheese and makeup. One American wine merchant called it the biggest threat to the industry since Prohibition a century ago.For its part, the French government had warned that the EU would retaliate if the U.S. imposed additional tariffs.The dispute was another headache for European trade officials scrambling to expand their policy arsenal as the U.S. takes aim at a rules-based system for global trade that Trump argues is outdated and tilted against America. It also coincided with a change in leadership at the European Commission, the EU’s executive arm.EU trade commissioner Phil Hogan visited Washington last week for the first time in the job, partly to plead for talks rather than tariffs in disagreements like the French digital tax. At stake, he said, was transatlantic trade in goods and services valued at more than $3 billion a day.“Sounds like a fairly healthy relationship to me,” Hogan said Thursday in the U.S. capital. “So why put tariffs on these EU products to make them more expensive for your people?”The truce follows weeks of discussions between Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and Le Maire, who were scheduled to meet Wednesday in Davos, Switzerland, the alpine resort town where government officials and business leaders gather during the winter to discuss whatever is ailing the global economy.The dispute has ramifications outside France as other countries try to come up with ways to generate revenue from the digital economy. Mnuchin told the Wall Street Journal that the U.K. and Italy will face American tariffs if they proceed with similar levies on foreign tech firms.U.S. and EU trade relations started to sour in 2018 when the Trump administration invoked national-security considerations to impose tariffs on steel and aluminum from Europe. As a U.S. military ally, the EU was infuriated and promptly retaliated with levies on iconic American brands such as Harley-Davidson Inc. motorcycles and Levi Strauss & Co. jeans.A subsequent U.S. threat to wreak significantly more economic damage by targeting the European auto industry with duties on the same security grounds led to a hastily agreed truce and a pledge by both sides to work toward reducing industrial tariffs across the board.Since then, the Trump administration has refused to start the tariff-cutting negotiations unless Europe includes agriculture in them. Also, it imposed levies on EU products in retaliation over government aid to Airbus SE that was deemed illegal by the World Trade Organization, and disabled the WTO’s appellate body,The EU, meanwhile, is pressing ahead with a plan for tariffs against the U.S. in a parallel WTO case over unlawful subsidies to Boeing Co.Trump, scheduled to speak Tuesday in Davos at the World Economic Forum’s annual meeting, on Sunday reiterated his frustration with Europe as a trading partner.“Europe has had tremendous barriers to us doing business with them. All those barriers are coming down. They have to come down,” he told a conference of farmers in Austin, Texas. “If they don’t come down, we’re going to have to do things that are very bad for them.”He added, “Europe was, in many ways, more difficult -- and is more difficult -- than China.”(Updates with possible French concession in the 11th paragraph)\--With assistance from Jonathan Stearns, Justin Sink and Chelsea Mes.To contact the reporters on this story: Ania Nussbaum in Paris at anianussbaum@bloomberg.net;William Horobin in Paris at whorobin@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Ben Sills at bsills@bloomberg.net, Brendan Murray, Wendy BenjaminsonFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Business Wire

    Levi Strauss & Co. to Webcast Fourth Quarter and Fiscal Year 2019 Earnings Conference Call

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  • An Intrinsic Calculation For Levi Strauss & Co. (NYSE:LEVI) Suggests It's 39% Undervalued
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    Abercrombie & Fitch same-store sales grow in US, shares down

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