LLD5.L - LLOYDS BANKING GROUP PLC ADR (E

LSE - LSE Delayed Price. Currency in USD
109.25
0.00 (0.00%)
At close: 3:06PM BST
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Previous Close109.25
Open0.00
Bid0.00 x 0
Ask0.00 x 0
Day's Range0.00 - 0.00
52 Week Range
Volume0
Avg. VolumeN/A
Market CapN/A
BetaN/A
PE Ratio (TTM)N/A
EPS (TTM)N/A
Earnings DateN/A
Forward Dividend & YieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-Dividend DateN/A
1y Target EstN/A
  • Investors attack Lloyds Bank over mistreatment of customers
    Reuters4 hours ago

    Investors attack Lloyds Bank over mistreatment of customers

    Britain's Lloyds Banking Group (LLOY.L) faced a barrage of allegations of poor customer service and withholding misconduct compensation on Thursday, laying bare the task of rebuilding customer trust after years of reputational damage. Shareholders of the UK's biggest commercial and retail lender were quick to go on the attack at the bank's annual general meeting, venting their anger over issues from fraud to the mistreatment of small businesses and the rates it charges "vulnerable" mortgage borrowers. A little more than a year since its return to private ownership after the British government finished selling the stake it assumed following its 2008 bailout, Lloyds has completed a restructuring of its business but is still struggling to restore its reputation.

  • Financial Times13 hours ago

    [$$] Lloyds shareholders protest over Horta-Osório pay

    More than a fifth of shareholders either voted against the lender’s pay report or abstained — not enough to stop the report being approved, but still marking the largest shareholder revolt against a British bank so far this year. António Horta-Osório, Lloyds chief executive, was paid a total of £6.2m in 2017, an 11 per cent pay rise on the previous year, and receives a benefits package worth 12.5 per cent of his salary.

  • Lloyds sells Irish mortgage business to Barclays for £4 billion
    Reuters6 days ago

    Lloyds sells Irish mortgage business to Barclays for £4 billion

    Lloyds Banking Group (LLOY.L) has sold its Irish residential mortgage portfolio to Barclays (BARC.L) for around 4 billion pounds in cash, as part of a plan to focus on its core British market. The deal was the last action Lloyds needed to take to complete its exit from the Irish market, following its closure of its retail banking operation there in 2010. Lloyds is left only with around 4 billion pounds worth of additional Irish mortgages that it will allow to expire over time.

  • Barclays Is Said to Plan Sale of Irish Mortgages to M&G, Pimco
    Bloomberg6 days ago

    Barclays Is Said to Plan Sale of Irish Mortgages to M&G, Pimco

    Barclays Plc plans to sell notes to M&G Prudential and Pacific Investment Management Co. in a securitization of 4.3 billion pounds ($5.8 billion) of Irish residential mortgages, according to people with knowledge of the matter. Barclays will probably hold about 5 percent of the notes, the minimum required to meet so-called skin-in-the-game rules, said the people, who asked not to be identified because the matter is confidential. Barclays acquired the loans from Lloyds Banking Group Plc in a deal announced earlier Friday.

  • Barclays Agrees to Buy Lloyds Irish Mortgages for $5.4 Billion
    Bloomberg6 days ago

    Barclays Agrees to Buy Lloyds Irish Mortgages for $5.4 Billion

    Barclays Plc agreed to buy a book of Irish residential mortgages from Lloyds Banking Group Plc for 4 billion pounds ($5.4 billiion) in cash as the seller focuses on the U.K. The deal will generate additional capital for London-based Lloyds, which will book a pretax loss of about 110 million pounds on the deal in its first-half earnings, the company said on Friday. The transaction is part of Lloyds Chief Executive Officer Antonio Horta-Osorio’s strategy to become a leaner, U.K.-focused retail bank.

  • Motley Fool7 days ago

    How Brexit Helped Create the World's Most Undervalued Bank

    Brexit fears have crushed this bank's stock price. Here's why now could be the best time to buy.

  • Inquiry into Lloyds' handling of HBOS fraud slips to late 2019 - source
    Reuters7 days ago

    Inquiry into Lloyds' handling of HBOS fraud slips to late 2019 - source

    A review of Lloyds Banking Group's handling of one of Britain's worst banking frauds is unlikely to be completed until late 2019 due to the volume of documents involved, a source with knowledge of the inquiry said. The investigation by a former high court judge was launched last year to assess whether Lloyds properly investigated and reported the fraud at HBOS, which it bought in January 2009. The review by Linda Dobbs is one of the last high-profile probes into the conduct of Britain's biggest banks after the 2008 financial crisis, and is eagerly awaited by victims of a fraud which has seen six people jailed for a combined 47 years.

  • Financial Times10 days ago

    [$$] TSB turned down help from Lloyds during IT failure

    TSB turned down an offer of assistance from its former owner Lloyds Banking Group at the beginning of an IT failure that left hundreds of thousands of customers locked out of their bank accounts. on the morning of Monday April 23, hours after it became clear that TSB’s new IT system had run into problems, according to two people with knowledge of the conversations. The people said Lloyds had made an open-ended offer to use its own expertise to help TSB, but TSB declined.

  • Why a Fund Giant Set the Lawyers on a Client
    Bloomberg16 days ago

    Why a Fund Giant Set the Lawyers on a Client

    When Lloyds Banking Group Plc announced that its Scottish Widows unit was pulling 109 billion pounds ($147 billion) of assets from Standard Life Aberdeen Plc, the fund manager was quick to downplay the financial significance of the withdrawal. Because in asset management, size matters more than anything else. SLA said on Tuesday it disagrees with Lloyds's February interpretation that the two companies are in "material competition," the reason the British bank gave for terminating the agreement.

  • Reuters16 days ago

    Standard Life Aberdeen challenges Lloyds Banking Group over axed mandate

    Standard Life Aberdeen (SLA) (SLA.L) has launched a contract dispute process against Lloyds Banking Group (LLOY.L) over the lender's decision to cancel a 109 billion pound asset management contract. Britain's biggest mortgage lender and parent of pensions provider Scottish Widows, told SLA on Feb. 14 that it intended to cancel the mandate at the end of a 12-month notice period, citing competition concerns following the 11 billion pounds merger of Aberdeen Asset Management and Standard Life. At the time, Lloyds said the combined entity had become a "material competitor" to its wealth and insurance units, and it had started a process to find a new manager for the assets, which mainly comprise of lower margin passive equity and fixed income securities.

  • Standard Life Aberdeen and Lloyds at war in £109bn bust-up
    Evening Standard16 days ago

    Standard Life Aberdeen and Lloyds at war in £109bn bust-up

    Lloyds Banking Group hit back at Standard Life Aberdeen today over the fund manager's decision to challenge the end of a £109 billion investment mandate. The FTSE 100 fund manager, led by co-chief executives Martin Gilbert and Keith Skeoch, said the lender had no right to call time on contract because it was not “in material competition” with Lloyds and subsidiary Scottish Widows. A Lloyds spokesman said the claims were “not credible”.

  • Standard Life Says Lloyds Didn't Have Right to Pull $148 Billion
    Bloomberg16 days ago

    Standard Life Says Lloyds Didn't Have Right to Pull $148 Billion

    Standard Life Aberdeen Plc is challenging the legality of the decision by Lloyds Banking Group Plc, its biggest client, to pull 109 billion pounds ($148 billion) from the asset manager. Lloyds gave notice in February that it planned to end the mandate after the merger of Aberdeen and Standard Life made the combined firm a competitor to the lender in the insurance industry. The Edinburgh-based money manager has since agreed to sell the insurance unit.

  • Britain's crime agency to expand probe into HBOS fraud allegations
    Reuters24 days ago

    Britain's crime agency to expand probe into HBOS fraud allegations

    Britain's National Crime Agency is expanding a review into fraud allegations at HBOS, part of Lloyds Banking Group, that have already led to the jailing of six people in a scam that pushed business owners to hire a costly turnaround consultancy. The NCA said on Monday it was following up a request from Thames Valley police, who conducted the investigation that led to the original convictions, with a view to a wider investigation into allegations of fraud and money laundering.

  • MarketWatch29 days ago

    FTSE 100 breaks 6-day win streak after rising bond yields spur selloff on Wall Street

    U.K. stocks dropped Wednesday, with the blue-chip market’s winning streak coming to an end as elevated U.S. bond yields triggered a selloff on Wall Street.

  • Lloyds’ move into the black sets the scene for a bumper banking season
    Evening Standard29 days ago

    Lloyds’ move into the black sets the scene for a bumper banking season

    LLOYDS Banking Group set the scene for the return of bumper bank profits today, on the back of a “resilient” economy and low unemployment. The UK’s biggest mortgage lender’s profits rose 23% in the first quarter to £1.6 billion, a result likely to be matched by peers in the next few days. Asked if Lloyds could do more to help TSB, which moved its computer systems away from Lloyds at the weekend and immediately saw its system crash, he replied: “We fulfilled our obligations.

  • Lloyds Bank reassures investors on future of preference shares
    Reuters29 days ago

    Lloyds Bank reassures investors on future of preference shares

    Britain's Lloyds Banking Group (LLOY.L) said it would not cancel its preference shares following investor complaints about the possibility after insurer Aviva (AV.L) abandoned its plans to scrap the high-yielding shares. George Culmer, the bank's chief financial officer, provided the reassurance on Wednesday as Lloyds reported first-quarter profits that just missed analysts' expectations. "Absolutely no discussion on these and absolutely no plans to cancel these irredeemable preference shares through a reduction in capital," Culmer told a media call.

  • Reuters29 days ago

    Lloyds Bank reassures investors on future of preference shares

    Britain's Lloyds Banking Group said it would not cancel its preference shares following investor complaints about the possibility after insurer Aviva abandoned its plans to scrap the high-yielding shares. George Culmer, the bank's chief financial officer, provided the reassurance on Wednesday as Lloyds reported first-quarter profits that just missed analysts' expectations. "Absolutely no discussion on these and absolutely no plans to cancel these irredeemable preference shares through a reduction in capital," Culmer told a media call.

  • Reuters29 days ago

    Income funds turn sights on UK banks as end of PPI saga draws closer

    Huge payouts to customers mis-sold mortgage and credit card payment protection insurance (PPI) have cost British banks dearly for years, but the end may be in sight and income fund managers are starting to show renewed interest in the sector. Millions of borrowers were sold unsuitable PPI policies, but a deadline for customer compensation claims has been set for August 2019 and investors are already becoming more bullish about the prospects of capital returns from the banks through dividends or buybacks. "What we're anticipating ... is actually that PPI hindrance goes away and we can get significant yield growth from these companies," said Ed Meier, who runs the Old Mutual UK Equity Income Fund.

  • Lloyds Bank profits rise 23% as lender cuts jobs and branches
    The Independent29 days ago

    Lloyds Bank profits rise 23% as lender cuts jobs and branches

    Lloyds Banking Group has reported a 23 per cent increase in profits to £1.6bn in the first quarter of the year, weeks after announcing another round of branch closures and job cuts. The lender posted a 4 per cent increase in net income for the three months to 31 March, from £4.18bn this time last year to £4.33bn, while earnings per share rose 36 per cent to 1.5p from 1.1p. “In the first three months of 2018 we have again delivered strong financial performance with increased profits and returns, a significantly reduced gap between underlying and statutory profit and a strong increase in capital.

  • The Wall Street Journal29 days ago

    [$$] Lloyds 1Q Pretax Profit Rises 23%

    PLC (LLOY.LN) said Wednesday that pretax profit rose 23% in the first quarter of 2018, as the U.K. lender benefited from lower exceptional charges and rising net income. The profit increase included a boost from lower provisions for claims of historic misselling of payment protection insurance, down to GBP90 million for the quarter from GBP350 million the year before. Lloyds also booked GBP258 million in impairment costs for the period, more than double a year earlier.

  • Reuterslast month

    Income funds turn sights on UK banks as end of PPI saga draws closer

    Huge payouts to customers mis-sold mortgage and credit card payment protection insurance (PPI) have cost British banks dearly for years, but the end may be in sight and income fund managers are starting to show renewed interest in the sector. Millions of borrowers were sold unsuitable PPI policies, but a deadline for customer compensation claims has been set for August 2019 and investors are already becoming more bullish about the prospects of capital returns from the banks through dividends or buybacks. "What we're anticipating ... is actually that PPI hindrance goes away and we can get significant yield growth from these companies," said Ed Meier, who runs the Old Mutual UK Equity Income Fund.