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Microsoft Corporation (MSFT)

NasdaqGS - NasdaqGS Real Time Price. Currency in USD
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228.99-5.56 (-2.37%)
At close: 4:00PM EST
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Triple Moving Average Crossover

Triple Moving Average Crossover

Previous Close234.55
Open232.08
Bid0.00 x 800
Ask0.00 x 1100
Day's Range227.88 - 234.59
52 Week Range132.52 - 246.13
Volume37,467,138
Avg. Volume28,397,875
Market Cap1.727T
Beta (5Y Monthly)0.82
PE Ratio (TTM)34.14
EPS (TTM)6.71
Earnings DateApr 27, 2021 - May 03, 2021
Forward Dividend & Yield2.24 (0.98%)
Ex-Dividend DateFeb 17, 2021
1y Target Est273.43
Fair Value is the appropriate price for the shares of a company, based on its earnings and growth rate also interpreted as when P/E Ratio = Growth Rate. Estimated return represents the projected annual return you might expect after purchasing shares in the company and holding them over the default time horizon of 5 years, based on the EPS growth rate that we have projected.
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