NESN.VX - NESTLE N

Swiss - Swiss Delayed Price. Currency in CHF
95.67
+0.39 (+0.41%)
As of 5:35PM CEST. Market open.
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Previous Close95.28
Open95.75
Bid105.16 x 0
Ask85.80 x 0
Day's Range95.30 - 95.88
52 Week Range95.30 - 95.88
Volume5,408,369
Avg. VolumeN/A
Market CapN/A
Beta (3Y Monthly)N/A
PE Ratio (TTM)N/A
EPS (TTM)N/A
Earnings DateN/A
Forward Dividend & YieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-Dividend DateN/A
1y Target EstN/A
  • EU Won’t Pull U.K. Market Access Amid Brexit, Lombard Odier Says
    Bloomberg3 days ago

    EU Won’t Pull U.K. Market Access Amid Brexit, Lombard Odier Says

    (Bloomberg) -- Follow @Brexit, sign up to our Brexit Bulletin, and tell us your Brexit story. The European Union is unlikely to withdraw the U.K. stock market’s equivalence status as a Brexit “negotiating tool” after withdrawing market recognition from Switzerland earlier this month, according to Lombard Odier.The U.K.’s equity market is almost twice the size of Switzerland’s and London’s clearing houses, which guarantee contracts even if one side proves insolvent, are a “core part” of Europe’s trading infrastructure, Stephane Monier, chief investment officer at Lombard Odier, wrote in a note.“The U.K. is watching closely for any indication that the European Commission may try to use similar negotiating pressure over Brexit,” Monier said.Stocks from Nestle SA to Swatch Group AG have been trading without a hitch since July 1, when Switzerland’s never-before-tested provisions to safeguard liquidity kicked in. The move followed a showdown with the EU after talks over a political agreement between the two sides ended in deadlock.For now, Switzerland’s “retaliatory” measures appear to have defended the Swiss stock market, and had “little discernible impact on trading operations, in terms of both price execution and liquidity,” Monier said.“The disagreement with Switzerland is required watching for anyone interested in what may lie ahead for the U.K. and the continent’s biggest trading market post Brexit.”To contact the reporter on this story: Albertina Torsoli in Geneva at atorsoli@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Beth Mellor at bmellor@bloomberg.net, Jan DahintenFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Should You Be Impressed By Nestlé S.A.'s (VTX:NESN) ROE?
    Simply Wall St.3 days ago

    Should You Be Impressed By Nestlé S.A.'s (VTX:NESN) ROE?

    While some investors are already well versed in financial metrics (hat tip), this article is for those who would like...

  • Baby Food Has Too Much Sugar And Is Marketed Wrongly, WHO Says
    Bloomberg4 days ago

    Baby Food Has Too Much Sugar And Is Marketed Wrongly, WHO Says

    (Bloomberg) -- Baby food often contains too much sugar and is incorrectly advertised as suitable for infants under 6 months of age, according to a new World Health Organization report.At least half of products analyzed in three of four cities provided more than 30% of their calories from sugars, according to the study. About a third of them listed sugar, concentrated fruit juice or other sweeteners as an ingredient.That raises the risk for obesity and diabetes later because it can wire young children to a lifelong preference for sweet foods. The WHO recommends babies be exclusively breastfed for the first six months of their lives, advice the world’s biggest baby-food makers like Nestle SA and Danone echo. The industry still faces criticism from groups like Baby Milk Action, which says companies often violate international marketing standards.In addition, the WHO study showed that as much as 60% of baby food products were being advertised as suitable for infants. While permitted under European Union law, it does break WHO’s guidance that food products to supplement breast milk or formula should not be marketed as suitable for babies under 6 months of age.The WHO collected data on 7,955 food or drink products marketed for infants and young children from 516 stores in Vienna, Sofia, Budapest and Haifa, Israel between November 2017 and January 2018. The study didn’t mention any company or brand names.To contact the reporter on this story: Corinne Gretler in Zurich at cgretler1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Eric Pfanner at epfanner1@bloomberg.net, Thomas MulierFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Abu Dhabi’s $697 Billion Wealth Fund Is Hiring
    Bloomberg4 days ago

    Abu Dhabi’s $697 Billion Wealth Fund Is Hiring

    (Bloomberg) -- In a world of diminishing returns, Abu Dhabi’s top sovereign wealth fund is hiring as it boosts active management of its estimated $697 billion portfolio.Abu Dhabi Investment Authority plans to "add a number of new positions, mostly within investment and research-focused roles" in its fixed income and treasury department this year, according to its annual report. The fund’s 20-year annualized rate of return fell to 5.4% from 6.5% a year earlier.ADIA’s returns fell to the lowest since it began reporting in 2008.Still, the fund almost matched the performance of the S&P 500 stock index, which had an average annualized return of about 5.6% over the past 20 years.Developed market equities make up as much as 42% of ADIA’s portfolio. Besides equities, it also holds bonds, credit, alternatives, real estate, private equity, infrastructure and cash.The fixed income and treasury department “has begun scaling up its active investing, with a view to going fully active in coming years, compared with around 40% currently,” Managing Director Sheikh Hamed bin Zayed Al Nahyan said in the report. The fund raised the portion of actively managed investments to 55% of its portfolio in 2018, up from 50% the previous year.ADIA’s private equity unit is also becoming more active. It sourced about 40% of its investments last year, a new high, up from 30% the previous year. While the total value of new principal investment has more than doubled since 2016.Sovereign wealth funds have been stepping up direct investments as they seek to generate returns in a low interest rate environment. ADIA earlier this month agreed to buy a 30% stake in Domestic & General Group Ltd., the U.K. appliance warranty provider owned by CVC Capital Partners. It also teamed up with EQT Partners in pursuit of Nestle SA’s $10 billion skincare business.ADIA, the world’s third-largest sovereign wealth fund according to the Sovereign Wealth Fund Institute, has been boosting its in-house teams over the past few years as it cuts the use of external fund managers. It manages about 45% of its assets in-house now, up from 25% in 2013.Other key highlights of ADIA’s annual report:“While ‘late-cycle’ has become a common term in market outlooks for 2019, we believe that the diversity and adaptability of economies means that the current cycle may well surprise with its resilience,” Sheikh Hamed said in the review.The fund is worried about the rise of nationalism. Globalization has helped boost growth and asset prices over the past few decades, and investors that have benefited from those trends need to “present the positive case and ensure that the public debate is well informed.”It’s also worried about climate change. The fund, which invests Abu Dhabi’s excess oil revenue, has made the impact on the environment a formal consideration in its review of investment proposals. It has also created eight new internal task-forces to assess the impact of climate change on its portfolio.It will invest more in India and China, with ADIA’s China real estate exposure up by one-third over the past two years.The fund created a new mandate for investing in Canada, and appointed an external manager to handle it. During 2019, it will look at creating more single country portfolios where it sees investment opportunities.(Updates with ADIA performance, S&P 500 returns in bullets.)\--With assistance from Mahmoud Habboush.To contact the reporter on this story: Matthew Martin in Dubai at mmartin128@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Stefania Bianchi at sbianchi10@bloomberg.net, Claudia Maedler, Shaji MathewFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Financial Times4 days ago

    Investors must look hard at the future of plastics

    Newton Abbot aims to be a plastic-free community. The Devon town is one of 569 communities in Britain to have joined a campaign led by environmental charity Surfers Against Sewage to stamp out single-use plastic. Government at local and national level is tackling plastic pollution, using targets for recycling and restrictions on particular single-use items.

  • Bloomberg7 days ago

    Vietnam Goes From Trade War Winner to Trump Target

    (Bloomberg) -- Americans are buying solar panels from Vietnam like never before, but local manufacturer IREX Energy JSC isn’t celebrating.After U.S. President Donald Trump slapped higher tariffs on China, production in neighboring Vietnam went into overdrive. Chinese manufacturers, who face a 55% U.S. tariff on their goods, relocated some production to Vietnam, while local businesses saw a jump in orders. In June alone, U.S. imports of solar cells from Vietnam surged 656% from a year ago.That trade boom in everything from Ikea furniture to Nike Inc. shoes is now prompting more scrutiny from the U.S. and making businesses like IREX concerned.“We are worried that the U.S. may raise tariffs on our solar panels,” Pham Thi Thu Trang, the company’s chief operating officer, said from Ho Chi Minh City. “Though the U.S market is huge, it is a complicated market when it comes to its politics.”Communist Party-led Vietnam has steadily opened up to foreign investors over the years to become a manufacturing hub in the region, with household names like Samsung Electronics Co., Intel Corp. and Nestle SA setting up factories there. It’s that trade openness, as well as its low-cost labor and proximity to China, that’s helped Vietnam successfully navigate growing global protectionism as companies seek out refuges from the trade war.It’s very quickly climbed the ranks to become a significant U.S. trade partner. Vietnam’s annual trade surplus with the U.S. has exceeded $20 billion since 2014 and reached $40 billion last year, the highest in records going back to 1990, according to U.S. Census Bureau data. For the first five months of the year, the surplus is already 43% higher than a year ago at $21.6 billion.The Trump administration is now pressuring the nation of 97 million people to slash its trade surplus, threatening one of the world’s fastest-growing economies.Trouble began in May, when the U.S. Treasury added Vietnam to a watchlist of countries being monitored for possible currency manipulation. Then, in response to U.S. pressure, Vietnam announced a crackdown on Chinese exporters rerouting products through the Southeast Asian nation with fake Made-in-Vietnam labels to bypass Trump’s tariffs.Trump described Vietnam last month as “almost the single-worst abuser of everybody” when asked if he wanted to impose tariffs on the nation. And just last week, the U.S. slapped duties of more than 400% on steel imports from Vietnam which originated in South Korea and Taiwan.Vietnam officials have been left reeling. The government says it’s committed to buying more U.S. goods, from Boeing Co. jets to energy products to help narrow its trade surplus with the world’s largest economy. Prime Minister Nguyen Xuan Phuc last week told officials to monitor U.S. reactions to the nation’s monetary policy more closely.“They are very nervous and confused. They don’t know what Trump’s next move will be,” said Alexander Vuving, a professor at the Daniel K. Inouye Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies in Hawaii.Vietnam has not been adept at responding to charges against its trading practices in Washington, where a cadre of lawyers are needed to quickly engage the government, said Nestor Scherbey, a licensed U.S. customs broker and consultant based in Ho Chi Minh City. “It’s like being charged in court and not showing up.”Cheap LaborCapital Economics Ltd. estimates that if Trump levied a 25% tariff on imports from Vietnam as he did with Chinese goods, Hanoi would see a 25% drop in export revenue, equivalent to more than 1% of the nation’s gross domestic product. That would erase the estimated 0.5 percentage-point gain it has had over the past year as a beneficiary of the trade war.Even before the trade tensions, Vietnam was benefiting from businesses looking for low-cost alternatives to China as wages there grew. That trend will likely continue, which should help to sustain Vietnam’s economic trajectory, according to Adam McCarty, chief economist with Mekong Economics in Hanoi.“It’s not going to stop the underlying economic motivation to move basic factory work from China to Vietnam,” he said. “China is getting too expensive.”Vietnam’s leaders have also long worked to buffer the country from trade shocks by hedging its reliance on any single market, including the U.S., the nation’s largest export destination. Vietnam has inked more than a dozen free trade agreements such as the just-signed deal with the European Union that will eliminate 99% of customs duties, and the revamped Trans-Pacific Partnership, which eventually provides duty-free access to markets such as Canada and Japan for many products.“Vietnam’s foreign policy for decades has been the opposite of what Groucho Marx said: he’d never want to join a club that would have him,” McCarty said. “The Vietnamese approach is to join every trade and investment club they possibly can.”For manufacturers like IREX, Trump’s recent action means they can’t sit back either.“Our sales department is looking for new markets, so if the U.S. increases Vietnam tariffs it won’t impact IREX’s business much,” said Trang, the company’s COO.(Updates with comments in 12th paragraph.)\--With assistance from Nguyen Dieu Tu Uyen.To contact the reporters on this story: John Boudreau in Hanoi at jboudreau3@bloomberg.net;Mai Ngoc Chau in Ho Chi Minh City at cmai9@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Nasreen Seria at nseria@bloomberg.net, Karthikeyan SundaramFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Abu Dhabi Fund to Buy 30% of Domestic & General Group
    Bloomberg9 days ago

    Abu Dhabi Fund to Buy 30% of Domestic & General Group

    (Bloomberg) -- Abu Dhabi’s sovereign wealth fund agreed to buy about a 30% stake in Domestic & General Group Ltd., the U.K. appliance warranty provider owned by CVC Capital Partners.The deal with the Abu Dhabi Investment Authority is expected to close by year-end, Domestic & General said in an emailed statement Wednesday, which confirmed an earlier Bloomberg News report. It didn’t disclose financial terms. The transaction values Domestic & General, which is used by one-third of U.K. households, at just over 1 billion pounds ($1.25 billion), people with knowledge of the matter said.CVC opted for a deal with ADIA, one of the world’s largest sovereign wealth funds, instead of an initial public offering of the business due to market uncertainty, one of the people said, asking not to be identified because the information is private.Sovereign wealth funds have been stepping up direct investments as they seek to generate returns in a low interest rate environment. ADIA has teamed up with EQT Partners in its pursuit of Nestle SA’s $10 billion skincare business. The fund was also planning to buy out Vornado Realty Trust’s 25% stake in a Manhattan office tower, a person familiar with the matter said in June.ADIA doesn’t divulge its assets under management, but it has been estimated to have about $696 billion. That makes it the third-largest in the world, according to data from the Sovereign Wealth Fund Institute.Domestic & General has about 16 million customers globally, with a presence in 11 countries including the U.K., Spain, Germany, France and Australia, according to the statement. CVC first invested in Domestic & General, which has about 2,000 employees in the U.K., in 2013. Since then, it has increased annual revenue from 633 million pounds to 811 million pounds, according to Wednesday’s statement. The buyout firm will transfer its remaining 70% holding in the business to Fund VII, which it raised in 2017, the statement shows. To contact the reporters on this story: Dinesh Nair in London at dnair5@bloomberg.net;Sarah Syed in London at ssyed35@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Ben Scent at bscent@bloomberg.net, Fion LiFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Financial Times9 days ago

    Abu Dhabi Investment Authority buys 30% stake in D&G

    Abu Dhabi’s sovereign wealth fund has agreed to buy a 30 per cent stake in Domestic & General after the UK’s white goods warranty provider abandoned plans for an initial public offering. The deal with Abu Dhabi Investment Authority valued the appliances insurer at close to £1.1bn, according to people familiar with the matter. In a statement on Wednesday, D&G said its current owners, private equity firm CVC Capital Partners, would retain a majority stake in the company.

  • Financial Times13 days ago

    Will London be Berned like the Swiss?

    For three years European asset managers have kept their fingers crossed for luck, wishing hard that the UK’s exit from the EU will do minimum damage to the €25tn investment industry. At the end of June, the EU allowed a permit called equivalence, which allows Swiss shares to be traded easily in the bloc, to expire. Switzerland retaliated with a warning that banks and asset managers would face fines or even jail if they flouted a ban on trading Swiss stocks on EU exchanges.

  • Private Equity Firms Are Done Waiting for Brexit
    Bloomberg16 days ago

    Private Equity Firms Are Done Waiting for Brexit

    (Bloomberg) -- Private equity firms scoping out opportunities in the U.K. are fed up with waiting for Brexit. They want their deals now.June was the busiest month for private equity buyouts of publicly traded U.K. companies in more than a decade, with $9.8 billion of announced deals, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. That followed a nine-month dry spell where only one major transaction was announced.Blackstone Group LP and a group of investors agreed to take over Merlin Entertainments Plc on June 28 in a deal valuing the Legoland parks operator at 4.8 billion pounds ($6 billion). That was two days after TDR Capital agreed to buy Webuyanycar.com owner BCA Marketplace Plc.Private equity takeovers like these haven’t been so active since November 2007, when the volume hit $10.3 billion, the data show. There’s likely more to come, with stocks hitting bargain prices. The FTSE All Share Index is down 3.5% in the 12 months through the end of June, and nearly 30 companies have lost at least half their value over the period.Several London dealmakers from some of the top investment banks said they expect U.K. take-private deals to account for the bulk of their time in the coming months, with one saying his firm is working on roughly a dozen potential transactions. Brexit-related risks are often priced in, and take-private deals are a way for funds to put a lot of capital to work at one time, said Kiran Sharma, a partner at Ropes & Gray.“The deals we are seeing are a result of that momentum that has been building,” Sharma said by phone Tuesday. “Private equity firms are also much more motivated to look at the public markets for deals given how overvalued the private markets are.”Buyout firms, sitting on $1.1 trillion of uninvested capital, are increasingly competing against each other for assets -- from Nestle SA’s $10 billion skin-care divestment to Bayer AG’s plans to sell its animal-health business. The U.K. government has also been working to soothe dealmakers’ concerns about Brexit, with International Trade Secretary Liam Fox meeting a dozen top private equity executives in December.Still, it remains to be seen how successful private equity will be in profiting from bets on Brexit bargains. Even the U.K. market, which is mired in uncertainty surrounding plans to leave the European Union later this year, is incredibly competitive -- take Apollo Global Management’s months-long pursuit of RPC Group Plc, which failed when Berry Global Group Inc. came in at the last minute with a higher offer.(Updates with U.K. government meeting PE firms in penultimate paragraph.)\--With assistance from Jan-Henrik Förster.To contact the reporters on this story: Dinesh Nair in London at dnair5@bloomberg.net;Sarah Syed in London at ssyed35@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Aaron Kirchfeld at akirchfeld@bloomberg.net, Ben Scent, Colin KeatingeFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Swiss Stocks Trade Smoothly on Day One Without EU Recognition
    Bloomberg18 days ago

    Swiss Stocks Trade Smoothly on Day One Without EU Recognition

    (Bloomberg) -- Want the lowdown on European markets? In your inbox before the open, every day. Sign up here.Stocks from Nestle to Swatch Group traded without a hitch on Monday as Switzerland’s never-before-tested provisions to safeguard liquidity kicked in following a showdown with the European Union.Swiss shares rose as much as 1.3% in Zurich, broadly in line with European peers on a positive day for equities after the U.S. and China reached a truce in the trade war and agreed to resume talks. Volume on the SMI index was about 6% above the 20-day average for this time of day, in line with increased activity on the Stoxx Europe 600 index.“So far, so good for trading into Swiss stocks,” said Eric Hassid, a trader at Aurel BGC in Paris. Index provider MSCI said in a statement that “there is no immediate impact, but we are monitoring the situation.”The Swiss trading activity will be watched for any indications it may provide for the post-Brexit U.K. market. Investors who’ve had to revise their game plan and reroute trades after the Swiss bourse lost recognition EU rules, will also continue to be on the lookout for price distortions or shortage of liquidity. A spokesman for Zurich bourse operator SIX Swiss Exchange said it was business as usual and too early to make an assessment of the changes.“In terms of impact for Swiss companies and financial institutions -- this is not clear,” said Scott Evans, a researcher at London Business School. “This also sends a very clear message to the U.K. regarding equivalence in the post Brexit period -- which so far has been viewed by the Brexiteers and the current U.K. government as a given.”The government responded to the looming loss of so-called equivalence for its exchanges under MiFID II on June 30 by taking the unprecedented step of banning trading in Swiss shares within the bloc. That’s intended to force flows back into Switzerland.The origins of the stock trading ban lie in a dispute between Bern and Brussels over an umbrella agreement to streamline political ties. Much as with U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May’s Brexit deal, the EU has declined to re-open talks about several provisions in the treaty that are unpopular in Switzerland. The EU used Switzerland’s stock market as a bargaining chip.That was possible because under MiFID II if a stock is regularly traded on an EU-regulated platform, the bloc’s investment firms must transact all their dealing there or on a foreign venue deemed equivalent.Under EU equivalence, about a third of trading in Swiss shares took place in the EU.While buying and selling most stocks probably won’t be an issue with equivalence lapsed and the Swiss government’s countermeasure in force, trading in shares that have a dual listing in EU markets -- such as engineering company ABB Ltd. or cement maker LafargeHolcim Ltd. -- could prove tricky.Not complying with the new rules on trading in Switzerland is a criminal offense, and U.K.-based trading venues run by companies including Cboe Global Markets Inc. and London Stock Exchange Group Plc, where most of the EU trading of Swiss shares takes place, have already told clients that they will exclude securities from Swiss issuers.There’s also the possibility of some trading disappearing into off-exchange venues that allow for less transparency although transaction costs are higher there.And as SIX Swiss Exchange Chairman Romeo Lacher noted last year, even if all trades are successfully redirected to Switzerland, investors could suffer from reduced competition among marketplaces.(Releads, adds trader comment in third paragraph.)\--With assistance from Blaise Robinson, Ksenia Galouchko and Alexander Weber.To contact the reporters on this story: Catherine Bosley in Zurich at cbosley1@bloomberg.net;Albertina Torsoli in Geneva at atorsoli@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Jan Dahinten at jdahinten@bloomberg.net, Vidya RootFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Did Nestlé's (VTX:NESN) Share Price Deserve to Gain 45%?
    Simply Wall St.18 days ago

    Did Nestlé's (VTX:NESN) Share Price Deserve to Gain 45%?

    Generally speaking the aim of active stock picking is to find companies that provide returns that are superior to the...

  • The Fed needs to cut rates this summer, says 'Oracle of Tampa' Jay Bowen
    Yahoo Finance2 months ago

    The Fed needs to cut rates this summer, says 'Oracle of Tampa' Jay Bowen

    Jay Bowen, an investor dubbed the 'Oracle of Tampa', says the Federal Reserve needs to cut interest rates this summer by a half percent.

  • Can We See Significant Institutional Ownership On The Nestlé S.A. (VTX:NESN) Share Register?
    Simply Wall St.2 months ago

    Can We See Significant Institutional Ownership On The Nestlé S.A. (VTX:NESN) Share Register?

    If you want to know who really controls Nestlé S.A. (VTX:NESN), then you'll have to look at the makeup of its share...

  • Nestle still committed to global confectionery: CEO
    Reuters2 months ago

    Nestle still committed to global confectionery: CEO

    Nestle remains committed to confectionery despite unloading its U.S. chocolate operations during a review of the food giant's operations, Chief Executive Mark Schneider told an event in Switzerland on Friday. "Our wide portfolio makes us strong...not everything is going to change," Schneider said. "You have to find focus and areas where you concentrate your efforts," he said, identifying water, baby food and animal food as Nestle's growth drivers.

  • Reuters2 months ago

    Nestle still committed to global confectionery - CEO

    Nestle remains committed to confectionery despite unloading its U.S. chocolate operations during a review of the food giant's operations, Chief Executive Mark Schneider told an event in Switzerland on Friday. "Our wide portfolio makes us strong...not everything is going to change," Schneider said. "You have to find focus and areas where you concentrate your efforts," he said, identifying water, baby food and animal food as Nestle's growth drivers.

  • Nestle and Fonterra mull sale of dairy joint venture in Brazil
    Reuters2 months ago

    Nestle and Fonterra mull sale of dairy joint venture in Brazil

    Swiss food group Nestle SA and New Zealand's dairy producer Fonterra Co-operative Group said they would review strategic options for their Dairy Partners Americas joint venture in Brazil, which could include ...

  • Nestle to boost healthy food products in Brazil, eyes partnerships
    Reuters2 months ago

    Nestle to boost healthy food products in Brazil, eyes partnerships

    Nestle SA will increase its natural and organic products in Brazil, its No. 4 market worldwide, as part of a wider Americas plan to cut sugar, sodium and saturated fats in its food, a spokesman said. The local subsidiary of Swiss-based Nestle has 25 initiatives in its pipeline for 2019, compared with 20 last year, with most geared toward natural and healthier products, its Brazil head of Marketing and Communications, Frank Pflaumer, told Reuters. Like other packaged food makers, the producer of Nescau chocolate powder and Kitkat bars is aligning itself with a worldwide consumer shift toward healthier food.