NFLX - Netflix, Inc.

NasdaqGS - NasdaqGS Real Time Price. Currency in USD
286.28
+2.03 (+0.71%)
At close: 4:00PM EDT
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Previous Close284.25
Open283.12
Bid0.00 x 900
Ask0.00 x 1300
Day's Range280.74 - 288.17
52 Week Range231.23 - 385.99
Volume18,413,335
Avg. Volume8,395,230
Market Cap125.343B
Beta (3Y Monthly)1.47
PE Ratio (TTM)112.71
EPS (TTM)2.54
Earnings DateJan 15, 2020 - Jan 20, 2020
Forward Dividend & YieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-Dividend DateN/A
1y Target Est368.63
Trade prices are not sourced from all markets
  • Netflix shares soar after Q3 earnings report, beating estimates
    Yahoo Finance Video

    Netflix shares soar after Q3 earnings report, beating estimates

    Netflix were higher after the streaming service reported its Q3 earnings, beating estimates. Leigh Drogen, the CEO of Estimize, joins Yahoo Finance's Jen Rogers, Myles Udland and Dan Roberts to talk about the results.

  • Dow Jones Futures: Netflix Earnings Crush Views, Pot Stock Cronos Soars; IBM Dives
    Investor's Business Daily

    Dow Jones Futures: Netflix Earnings Crush Views, Pot Stock Cronos Soars; IBM Dives

    Dow futures fell as IBM dived late. Netflix earnings crushed views, sending Netflix stock soaring. Marijuana stocks rose, led by Cronos Group stock.

  • Dow Jones Futures: Netflix, IBM Lead Big Earnings Movers As Stock Market Rally Holds Strong
    Investor's Business Daily

    Dow Jones Futures: Netflix, IBM Lead Big Earnings Movers As Stock Market Rally Holds Strong

    Stock futures: Netflix soared late on earnings despite missing on subscriber growth again. IBM, Alcoa and CSX were big earnings movers too.

  • Twitter Q3 2019 Earnings Preview: Buy TWTR Stock Up 40% in 2019?
    Zacks

    Twitter Q3 2019 Earnings Preview: Buy TWTR Stock Up 40% in 2019?

    Twitter (TWTR) stock has surged roughly 40% in 2019 to fall just behind Facebook's (FB) 45%. Despite the run of success, Twitter shares remain an enigma to many on Wall Street...

  • Netflix Restores Faith Ahead of Challenges From Disney, Apple
    Bloomberg

    Netflix Restores Faith Ahead of Challenges From Disney, Apple

    (Bloomberg) -- Netflix Inc. delivered enough good news Wednesday to allay concerns about looming competition from Walt Disney Co. and Apple Inc.The company added 6.77 million subscribers in the third quarter, with stronger-than-expected growth overseas. Earnings also topped Wall Street estimates, letting investors overlook a tepid forecast for the final quarter of the year.Investors had been bracing for a weak showing after Netflix delivered a disappointing quarter three months ago. The stock had been flagging for weeks. The actual results -- though far from perfect -- were a relief, sending the shares up as much as 11% in late trading.“It was a really strong quarter -- not just around subscribers, the overall business performance,” Chief Financial Officer Spencer Neumann said in a taped interview with Guggenheim Securities analyst Michael Morris.International markets account for almost all of Netflix’s growth -- and most of its total customers. The world’s largest paid online TV network signed up 6.26 million new users outside the U.S., beating forecasts. Netflix expects to sign 7 million more international customers during the current three months, ending the year with its strongest overseas growth to date.The company benefited from new seasons of a couple of its most popular shows. The teen science-fiction show “Stranger Things” was viewed by 64 million households in its first four weeks, making it the most-watched season of original programming on Netflix. A new season of “La Casa de Papel,” a Spanish heist series, was viewed by 44 million households. It was Netflix’s most-watched show in non-English-speaking countries.Netflix is looking to stoke demand outside the U.S. by investing more in international original series. The company has already released 100 seasons of local language scripted series from 17 countries, and plans to release more than 130 next year alone.Overseas markets will be even more important in the face of new competition from Disney, Apple, Comcast Corp. and AT&T Inc. All four of those companies will introduce new streaming services in the next few months, starting in the U.S. While the final three months of the year are typically among the company’s strongest, Netflix expects to add a total of 7.6 million more customers in the fourth quarter -- fewer than it did a year ago.‘Noisy’ LaunchThe new services from Disney and Apple both launch next month. The Disney+ platform is geared toward kids and families, with hundreds of movies and shows, including Star Wars, Avengers and Pixar fare. Apple’s product is more adult-oriented and has less content.“The launch of these new services will be noisy,” Netflix said in its quarterly letter to investors. “There may be some modest headwind to our near-term growth, and we have tried to factor that into our guidance.”The stock has taken a beating lately, dropping 21% since the prior quarter’s miss was announced in July. Even after the latest rally, it’s not back to its summertime highs, but Netflix has restored the faith of many investors.Third-quarter revenue grew 31% to $5.24 billion, just shy of Wall Street projections. Profit increased to $1.47 a share, easily beating analysts’ estimates of $1.05. This quarter, the company forecasts earnings of 51 cents a share on sales of $5.44 billion. Both are below Wall Street estimates.Recent price hikes have lifted both profit and revenue. Those increases have slowed subscriber growth in the U.S., however. Gains in the U.S. last quarter amounted to just 520,000 new accounts, and the company is going to post its weakest growth at home in years, adding just 2.7 million customers this year.The Los Gatos, California-based company will continue to use the junk-bond market to finance its programming costs, which are expected to total about $15 billion this year. Netflix didn’t say whether it would increase prices again any time soon. It does plan to test more mobile-only and cheaper plans in poorer countries across Asia, where it has the most room to grow.“We’re incredibly low-priced compared to cable,” Chief Executive Officer Reed Hastings said. “We’re winning more and more viewing.”To contact the reporter on this story: Lucas Shaw in Los Angeles at lshaw31@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Nick Turner at nturner7@bloomberg.netFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Reuters

    UPDATE 1-'Panama Papers' law firm sues Netflix over film based on scandal

    Mossack Fonseca, a Panamanian law firm at the center of the "Panama Papers" scandal, has filed a lawsuit against Netflix Inc over its new movie based on the case, accusing the video streaming company of defamation and seeking to stop the film's release. The Panama Papers, which consist of millions of documents stolen from Mossack Fonseca and leaked to the media in 2016, provoked a global scandal after showing how rich and powerful clients including Russian President Vladimir Putin and soccer superstar Lionel Messi used offshore corporations to evade taxes.

  • Spiros Segalas' Top 5 Buys in the 3rd Quarter
    GuruFocus.com

    Spiros Segalas' Top 5 Buys in the 3rd Quarter

    Fund’s top buys include Uber and Netflix rival Disney Continue reading...

  • Netflix finally admits the obvious: Competition from Apple and Disney will hurt
    MarketWatch

    Netflix finally admits the obvious: Competition from Apple and Disney will hurt

    Netflix Inc. has been dismissive of the anticipated impact of an onslaught of streaming competitors, but as a wave of well-financed streaming services from big-name companies is about to be unleashed, executives’ tone has changed.

  • Amazon (AMZN) Q3 2019 Earnings Preview: AWS, Prime & Advertising
    Zacks

    Amazon (AMZN) Q3 2019 Earnings Preview: AWS, Prime & Advertising

    Amazon stock is down 11% in the last three months heading into its Q3 earnings release on Thursday, October 24. So let's see what to expect from the e-commerce giant, including AWS, Prime, and advertising...

  • Netflix stock spikes after subscriber growth bounces back, but executives admit competition will hurt the rest of the year
    MarketWatch

    Netflix stock spikes after subscriber growth bounces back, but executives admit competition will hurt the rest of the year

    Netflix Inc. announced the net addition of 6.77 million paying subscribers in its third-quarter financial results Wednesday afternoon, an about-face from the previous quarter, when it came up frighteningly short.

  • Netflix Approaches Critical Test of Its Viability
    Bloomberg

    Netflix Approaches Critical Test of Its Viability

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Netflix Inc. is approaching a litmus test of its sustainability.The company said on Wednesday in its third-quarter earnings release that it would add fewer net new streaming video customers this year than in 2018. Paid subscriber growth fell short of Netflix’s forecast for the second consecutive quarter. The company is still adding customers at a healthy clip, to be sure, but Netflix is predicated on adding streaming video customers essentially to infinity.The company said it misjudged how many people would cancel when it raised prices in the U.S. and some other countries, and it said alternative Netflix-like services would hurt, at least on the margins. The company also said it was having a harder time predicting the number of new subscribers in the next few months because of an abundance of untested movies or series that will hit its service soon.None of this is great news for a company that has declared itself immune to external forces like competition, the supply-and-demand swings of price increases and the typical wax-and-wane of hit-driven entertainment companies. Surprisingly, Netflix shares surged in after-market trading on this news. The company’s stock price had fallen about 20% after the disclosure in July that it lost U.S. customers in the second quarter, something that had not happened for years.Since that earnings flop, optimism about Netflix has been laced with a ribbon of fear. Many investors and entertainment industry watchers are eager to see whether new streaming video services that will start to debut late this year from Apple Inc., Walt Disney Co. and AT&T Inc.’s HBO will eat into Netflix’s customer growth. On Wednesday, Netflix both provided cherry-picked evidence that competing services don’t clip its wings and acknowledged that competition is hurting. It’s a typical head-scratcher from a management team that sounds overconfident at times. Netflix has always said that no single company will take all the spoils in streaming video, and it’s right. Paradoxically, a growing tangle of online entertainment options may make Netflix’s simplicity more appealing. Still, Netflix needs to keep expanding its subscriber numbers — particularly in the U.S., because that’s where its economics work the best. If Netflix’s fourth-quarter forecast pans out, the company’s U.S. paid customer numbers are growing at 1% or less each quarter from the prior period, down from a quarter-to-quarter growth rate of 2% to 4% in the last few years.(1) This is hardly doomsday. It’s also not good for a company at which minor slowdowns in growth can make a drastic difference in profit potential.I’m also looking at another test of Netflix’s viability that’s more important than the myopic focus on a “war” between Netflix and a tiny number of mostly U.S.-focused streaming options. That test is whether Netflix can stop lighting so much cash on fire.The company in the last 12 months has spent $13.6 billion in cash on programming and burned through $2.9 billion more cash than it took in from subscription fees and other revenue. This upside-down financial status has persisted for about five years.To me, this cash-burning status — not competition from other streaming companies, not fickle taste in consumer entertainment or the newfound reluctance of many entertainment companies to stock Netflix with programming — is the company’s biggest Achilles’ heel and evidence of the cost of Netflix’s ambitions. This condition is no secret, but even the typical financial worrywarts have been unperturbed that Netflix is perpetually spending other people’s money to cement itself as a default entertainment option for billions of people.Netflix reiterated on Wednesday that 2019 would be a peak year of spending more cash than it takes in. Conditions will improve a little next year and then some more after that, Netflix said. The company doesn’t say when it can stop borrowing money to fund itself, but some analysts have estimated the tide will turn in 2021 or 2022. If growth continues to slow, however, that tipping point of self-sustainability pushes further out. Netflix’s torrent of spending and borrowing to pay for more programming and continued growth get harder if the sign-up rate slows even a touch. Netflix has always been a matter of faith: Either you believe it will be a lasting, economically flush staple of global entertainment or you don’t.The slowing customer growth shows that more than a decade after Netflix started to lead a revolution in home entertainment, a simple question remains unanswered: Will even the winners in streaming video be alive at the end?(1) Yes, the quarterly growth rate from the prior year is also slowing.To contact the author of this story: Shira Ovide at sovide@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Daniel Niemi at dniemi1@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Shira Ovide is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering technology. She previously was a reporter for the Wall Street Journal.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Barrons.com

    Netflix Stock Is Soaring After Its Earnings Easily Beat Expectations. What You Need to Know.

    For the September quarter, Netflix posted revenue of $5.244 billion, just a hair below the company’s projection of $5.25 billion. The company’s operating margin came in at 18.7%, well ahead of the projected 14.3%. For the fourth quarter, Netflix is projecting revenue of $5.442 billion with per-share earnings of 51 cents, and 7.6 million net new subscriber adds.

  • Netflix (NFLX) Surpasses Q3 Earnings Estimates
    Zacks

    Netflix (NFLX) Surpasses Q3 Earnings Estimates

    Netflix (NFLX) delivered earnings and revenue surprises of 40.00% and -0.07%, respectively, for the quarter ended September 2019. Do the numbers hold clues to what lies ahead for the stock?

  • Netflix shares surge despite missing subscriber forecast for the 2nd quarter in a row
    American City Business Journals

    Netflix shares surge despite missing subscriber forecast for the 2nd quarter in a row

    The streaming giant reported the addition of 6.8 million paid membership in its Q3 earnings — slightly less than the 7 million net adds it had projected.

  • Netflix Beats, Up 7%; IBM Mixed, Down 2.7%
    Zacks

    Netflix Beats, Up 7%; IBM Mixed, Down 2.7%

    Netflix (NFLX) has outperformed earnings expectations for Q3 after the bell today, while IBM posted mixed results.

  • Netflix Stock Jumps On Earnings Beat, Despite Subscriber Miss
    Investor's Business Daily

    Netflix Stock Jumps On Earnings Beat, Despite Subscriber Miss

    Internet television network Netflix late Wednesday missed its target for new subscribers for the second quarter in a row. But better-than-expected Netflix earnings sent its stock higher.

  • Netflix a 'Hold'; Disney Has Great Business Model: Gerber Kawasaki
    Bloomberg

    Netflix a 'Hold'; Disney Has Great Business Model: Gerber Kawasaki

    Oct.16 -- Ross Gerber, president, chief executive officer and co-founder of Gerber Kawasaki, talks about Netflix Inc. and Walt Disney Co. Netflix shares rallied after the company posted slightly better-than-expected subscriber growth overseas in the third quarter, and earnings topped Wall Street estimates. Gerber, whose company owns Netflix and Disney shares, speaks with Haidi Stroud-Watts and Taylor Riggs on "Bloomberg Technology: Global Link."

  • Why Netflix Shares Are Surging After Releasing Latest Earnings Report
    Bloomberg

    Why Netflix Shares Are Surging After Releasing Latest Earnings Report

    Oct.16 -- Bloomberg's Lucas Shaw breaks down Netflix Inc.'s third-quarter earnings report. He speaks with Bloomberg's Taylor Riggs on "Bloomberg Technology."

  • Netflix Will Have to Be More Careful Raising Prices, Analyst Haggstrom Says
    Bloomberg

    Netflix Will Have to Be More Careful Raising Prices, Analyst Haggstrom Says

    Oct.16 -- Eric Haggstrom, EMarketer analyst, discusses the key takeaways from Netflix Inc.'s third-quarter earnings report. He speaks with Bloomberg's Taylor Riggs on "Bloomberg Technology."