NFLX - Netflix, Inc.

NasdaqGS - NasdaqGS Real Time Price. Currency in USD
299.84
+0.85 (+0.28%)
As of 12:28PM EDT. Market open.
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous Close298.99
Open301.61
Bid299.92 x 2200
Ask300.02 x 1400
Day's Range298.27 - 302.87
52 Week Range231.23 - 386.80
Volume2,718,937
Avg. Volume6,917,373
Market Cap131.28B
Beta (3Y Monthly)1.36
PE Ratio (TTM)118.05
EPS (TTM)2.54
Earnings DateOct 14, 2019 - Oct 18, 2019
Forward Dividend & YieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-Dividend DateN/A
1y Target Est388.40
Trade prices are not sourced from all markets
  • Apple is spending $6 billion on original shows, movies: Report
    Yahoo Finance Video

    Apple is spending $6 billion on original shows, movies: Report

    Apple has committed more than $6 billion for original shows and movies ahead of the launch of its new video streaming service, according to a report by the Financial Times. Yahoo Finance's Dan Howley breaks down what this means for the state of streaming, and what effects the company's endeavors into this space means for competitors Netflix, Disney and AT&T-owned HBO.

  • Netflix stock is vulnerable in a recession, Nomura says
    Yahoo Finance

    Netflix stock is vulnerable in a recession, Nomura says

    E-commerce stocks are the best to own in a recession, Nomura analysts say. But is Netflix recession-proof?

  • ACCESSWIRE

    The Gross Law Firm Announces Class Actions on Behalf of Shareholders of DBD, NFLX and EGBN

    NEW YORK, NY / ACCESSWIRE / August 21, 2019 / The securities litigation law firm of The Gross Law Firm issues the following notice on behalf of shareholders in the following publicly traded companies. Shareholders who purchased shares in the following companies during the dates listed are encouraged to contact the firm regarding possible Lead Plaintiff appointment. A class action has commenced on behalf of certain shareholders in Diebold Nixdorf, Incorporated.

  • Amazon Targets Subscribers in Australia With Original Content
    Zacks

    Amazon Targets Subscribers in Australia With Original Content

    Amazon's (AMZN) contract with Rebel Wilson to make its first Australian original series is likely to expand its presence in the streaming market of Australia.

  • ACCESSWIRE

    Helius Medical Technologies, Inc. (HSDT), Ideanomics Inc. (IDEX) & Netflix, Inc. (NFLX) -Bronstein, Gewirtz & Grossman, LLC - Class Action Update

    NEW YORK, NY / ACCESSWIRE / August 21, 2019 / Bronstein, Gewirtz & Grossman, LLC reminds investors that a class action lawsuit has been filed against the following publicly-traded companies. You can review a copy of the Complaints by visiting the links below or you may contact Peretz Bronstein, Esq. If you suffered a loss, you can request that the Court appoint you as lead plaintiff.

  • GlobeNewswire

    CLASS ACTION UPDATE for OMCL, NFLX, GVA and TWOU: Levi & Korsinsky, LLP Reminds Investors of Class Actions on Behalf of Shareholders

    NEW YORK, Aug. 21, 2019 -- Levi & Korsinsky, LLP announces that class action lawsuits have commenced on behalf of shareholders of the following publicly-traded companies..

  • 5 Important Takeaways From iQiyi's Q2 Earnings Report
    Motley Fool

    5 Important Takeaways From iQiyi's Q2 Earnings Report

    Losses continue, but that's business as usual.

  • Apple TV+'s Plus-Size Content Budget
    Motley Fool

    Apple TV+'s Plus-Size Content Budget

    The tech titan is spending a lot more than its original $1 billion plan.

  • Financial Times

    Apple/Disney/streaming: bundles of joy

    US streaming services are as good at upstaging one another as the big-name actors they increasingly employ. Apple’s trailer for a flagship series featuring Jennifer Aniston and Steve Carell this week trumped Disney’s plan to launch a new online video service in November. At first glance, both services are contenders to defeat Netflix.

  • Second Quarter Numbers Not Enough for iQiyi Stock
    InvestorPlace

    Second Quarter Numbers Not Enough for iQiyi Stock

    Chinese streaming TV giant iQiyi (NASDAQ:IQ) -- often dubbed the Netflix (NASDAQ:NFLX) of China -- reported second quarter numbers in late August that weren't all the great. Revenues came in line with expectations, but revenue growth slowed meaningfully from the prior quarter. Profits, meanwhile, missed expectations, as operating losses widened year-over-year amid heavy content spend.Source: Shutterstock In response to the sub-par results, IQ stock dropped.Zooming out, the big picture idea here is that iQiyi's second quarter earnings report wasn't good enough to warrant buying IQ stock. Instead, it didn't ease any of the company's major fundamental issues, and implied that the fundamentals will remain depressed for the foreseeable future.InvestorPlace - Stock Market News, Stock Advice & Trading Tips * 10 Mid-Cap Dividend Stocks to Buy Now As such, it is likely that iQiyi stock will remain depressed for the foreseeable future, too.The investment implication? Continue to avoid IQ stock. Fundamental challenges remain, and so long as they do, IQ stock will remain similarly challenged. Second-Quarter Print Wasn't EnoughHeading into the Q2 print, iQiyi had a few big challenges.First, iQiyi's unit economics weren't good, as the company rakes in very little revenue per subscriber but pays out a ton in content and marketing costs per subscriber. Second, iQiyi's revenue growth trajectory had been slowing significantly due to challenges in the company's digital ad business. Third, the company was running wide losses against a slowing growth backdrop.None these challenges were addressed in the Q2 report. Instead, second quarter numbers affirmed that these challenges remain very real.iQiyi's average revenue per user dropped a whopping 23% year-over-year in Q2. To be sure, a bulk of that decline was driven by the tumbling digital ad business. But, excluding digital ad revenues, ARPU still dropped year-over-year. Revenue growth slowed to 15% - from over 40% in Q1 -- and is expected to slow to below 10% next quarter. Operating loss margin widened from -21.5% in the year ago quarter, to -26.3% this quarter.In other words, iQiyi isn't growing unit revenue, is suffering from a slowing growth trend, and the margin profile is deteriorating. That's a losing combo. So long as this losing combo hangs around, IQ stock will remain weak. iQiyi Stock Remains Overvalued Considering Fundamental ChallengesZooming out and seeing the big picture, iQiyi does have healthy long-term growth prospects. But, those long-term growth prospects aren't good enough -- yet -- to warrant an $18 price tag for IQ stock.Broadly speaking, my modeling remains largely similar to what it was before the Q2 print (see the math here). The only big differences are that I'm reducing my long term ARPU outlook slightly given continued negative trends on that front, and that I'm cutting my long term forecast for the digital ad business given macro challenges in the China ad market.Net net, I now think that iQiyi will be able to do about $12 billion in revenues by 2025, with roughly 10% operating margins. That combination makes $1.20 seem like a doable EPS target for iQiyi by 2025. Based on a growth stock average 20-times forward multiple, that implies a fundamentally supported 2024 price target for IQ stock of $24.Discounted back by 10% per year, that equates to a 2019 price target of about $15. That's notably lower than today's price tag. Bottom Line on IQ StockiQiyi is an interesting growth company in China's burgeoning digital economy. But the company also has fundamental challenges: depressed unit economics, a tumbling digital ad business, and weak and deteriorating margins. The second quarter print confirmed that those challenges remain as real today as they've ever been. * 10 Undervalued Stocks With Breakout Potential So long as those challenges hang around, IQ stock will remain weak.As of this writing, Luke Lango was long NFLX. More From InvestorPlace * 2 Toxic Pot Stocks You Should Avoid * 10 Cheap Dividend Stocks to Load Up On * The 10 Biggest Losers from Q2 Earnings * 5 Dependable Dividend Stocks to Buy The post Second Quarter Numbers Not Enough for iQiyi Stock appeared first on InvestorPlace.

  • As YouTube Mulls Changes to Kids’ Content, Rival Services See Opportunity
    Bloomberg

    As YouTube Mulls Changes to Kids’ Content, Rival Services See Opportunity

    (Bloomberg) -- Earlier this summer, the Federal Trade Commission began holding private talks with YouTube officials, part of a burgeoning investigation. The video service stands accused of breaking laws overseeing kids’ web habits, placing a massive library of media and accompanying revenue in jeopardy. Neither YouTube nor the regulators have discussed the talks publicly. Yet despite the secrecy, a small British marketing firm started emailing some marquee YouTube advertisers about the developments. Reports indicated that the FTC would hit YouTube with a record fine and force its operations to change -- something, the emails noted, that would "be of interest" to YouTube's sponsors. "Regardless of what size the fine actually is, it represents a shift in the world for children's digital privacy," read the message. "Look forward to seeing you soon.”The emails were from SuperAwesome Ltd. Toy makers, animators and other brands pay the company to place online ads or access tools like the startup’s “safe, moderated” system for internet comments. In July, SuperAwesome added another offering: a video service, called Rukkaz, that works much like YouTube. Amateur broadcasters upload videos, sponsors back them and kids watch. Only the startup pledged to work with only hand-picked broadcasters, and pitched the service as a way to abide by privacy laws and avoid the demented footage lurking on the open web. "This is something that Google and Facebook, and arguably Apple, should have been doing for the past five years," said Dylan Collins, SuperAwesome's chief executive officer. "And they haven't."    Waves of new media darlings have tried to unseat YouTube, with no success. But Collins is one of several entrepreneurs trying to strike while YouTube is in turmoil. The video behemoth, owned by Alphabet Inc.'s Google, has earned a reputation as a Wild West of media, a place where young viewers have too readily stumbled on footage of crass humor or bloody violence. Lawmakers have asked about this, part of the scrutiny of the privacy practices and dominance of big tech. The FTC is probing whether Google violated the Children's Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA), which prohibits tracking the personal information of minors under thirteen. YouTube's frequent tweaks to its all-powerful algorithms and ads policies have left video creators disgruntled. A handful of upstarts are hoping this momentum will help their cause. They've roped in venture financing, licensing deals and customers with the promise of creating kid-safe internet real estate.The FTC is inadvertently playing a role, too. Uncertainty over the case is producing panic in parts of the YouTube community, prompting some stars to hunt for alternatives. News reports surfaced that the FTC may force YouTube to move all children's videos to its Kids app or cut them off from ads. YouTube has offered no public statement on the issue and rumors have filled the vacuum."No one really has a sense of what is going to happen," said Michael, who runs KidCity and two other YouTube family channels. He is one of more than 150 YouTubers jumping to Rukkaz. He isn't moving off YouTube, but will cross-post select YouTube clips with the startup, which will share ad revenue. He asked that his last name not be revealed to protect the privacy of his two children.Kid's media online is booming as millions of children swap Saturday morning cartoons for streaming and smartphones. Most streaming services, like Netflix, run curated, slickly produced shows for kids, while YouTube relies on a mountain of unscripted, user-generated content. Multiple people who make these videos said that, in recent months, support representatives from YouTube have halted contact without explanation. A chief concern for many creators is that their videos will be restricted to YouTube Kids, a much less popular service, where Google runs fewer ads. “That would put everyone out of business. I mean, almost overnight,” said Michael.YouTube is unlikely to do that, or to cut off all its kids and family footage from ads. Instead, to comply with the FTC, YouTube is planning to end “targeted” ads on videos kids are likely to watch, Bloomberg News reported on Tuesday. That solution would make it harder for the creators behind those clips to earn more from ads, although it's a less draconian move than some other rumored options.A problem with this approach, though, is defining kids’ videos. COPPA applies to any web service “directed to children.” While most clips on YouTube Kids, such as nursery rhyme cartoons, clearly are, other huge swaths of YouTube, like footage of video game streaming, arguably aren’t. Yet it’s an open secret that younger viewers love watching people play video games. Roughly a quarter of the YouTube ads one major toy company buys run on Minecraft videos, according to a media buyer with knowledge of the matter who asked not to be identified discussing private data. “The difficulty here is determining what is ‘kid’s directed,’” said Ashkan Soltani, a privacy researcher who previously served as the Chief Technologist for the FTC. “It’s not a bright-line rule.”  Once the line is drawn, YouTube creators do not want to fall on the wrong side. Many, like KidCity’s Michael, now describe their productions as “family-based play” or “co-play” – videos that feature adults and, the hope is, that adults watch. YouTube is not the only major player in an uncomfortable spot; other tech platforms are under similar pressure. The FTC fined Bytedance Inc., the owner of popular app TikTok, for violating federal guidelines on minors. Critics have complained that Facebook Inc. illegally tracks children’s online behavior. Many in children's media don't expect a viable solution to come from the household names. "It doesn't make sense that big internet companies can take something they designed for grown-ups and make that for kids," said Kevin Donahue, an early YouTube executive who now runs Epic, an e-book startup. "You have to create something new." (Donahue said has no interest in rivaling his old company, though. "We're not at all doing that," he said.)For most newcomers, that something looks like Netflix: A subscription service with a limited selection. The idea is that parents would pay for some parts of YouTube popular with kids: the toy unboxers and niche animators, without the pratfalls of an unlimited content library. Three years ago, Epic added video to its $7.99 a month e-books app. It offers a few thousand clips, all reviewed by staff members. Kidoodle.TV, a Canadian company, offers children’s videos on set-top box services like Roku. Another, JuniorTube, had a slate of curated amateur videos available on a subscription-based app. Earlier this week, Roku added a new curated kids and family section.Highbrow, a London-based startup, sells a $6.49 monthly service with a tagline “trusted by schools and parents worldwide.” Priyanka Raswant, a corporate lawyer, formed the company as she was preparing to have her first child. She found most videos available on YouTube Kids “nonsensical” and the app unhelpful for parents. “If you see something outrageous, you have to report it,” Raswant said. “They’ve put the onus on the parents. Most parents don’t even have time to brush their teeth.” Highbrow has partnered with telecoms in Latin America and India for distribution, but doesn’t share sales data. The service carries videos from Pinkfong, the studio behind mega-hit “Baby Shark,” as well as smaller shows like “Travel With Kids” from PBS.SuperAwesome is one of the few borrowing YouTube’s model of free, ad-supported programming. The startup is set to book $60 million in revenue this year. (YouTube doesn’t share sales, but estimates place the yearly sales from its kids’ content north of $700 million.) Collins said his company is profitable. Of course, the uncertainty surrounding kids’ online video could also threaten those profits. His ad business is competing against  those at the twin giants of Google and Facebook. The benefits of SuperAwesome’s ad services might not be as apparent if YouTube passes through the FTC probe unscathed and grows its Kids’ app.That could mean that more is riding on Collins’ video service. For Rukkaz, Collins is targeting YouTube's blind spots. Most of YouTube Kids caters to preschoolers, so Collins is recruiting creators aiming for an older audience. He's also approaching creators with between 500 thousand and a million subscribers on YouTube -- enough to earn livings from the site, but not to be inculcated from its swings. "This entire community is really being orphaned by YouTube," Collins said.Michael, who runs the KidCity channel, is optimistic about Rukkaz. He’s planning to use SuperAwesome’s feature for hosting video comments, which he finds useful for getting audience feedback. YouTube shut off comments on videos with children earlier this year, but allowed a select group of channels to keep them with the condition they “actively moderate” the posts. Filtering those comments, though, requires using a manual system. “You have to go in there and spell the dirty words,” he said. His attempts to find footing beyond YouTube haven’t succeed in the past. On KidCity, the Texan father and his two children perform long skits dressed up as familiar cartoon characters – Marvel Comic’s Wolverine or Disney’s Queen Elsa. They tried to post one of these clips on Amazon’s self-publishing service, Prime Video Direct, but the company rejected the videos citing intellectual property concerns. A KidCity clip of his son donning a Spiderman costume and testing a Spiderman toy has over 85 million views on YouTube. YouTube’s laissez-faire approach to media has brought scathing critics, but it has also enabled countless careers online."That's the creator platform for kids," said Michael. "The only one, unfortunately." At least one would-be YouTube rival has already bit the dust. JuniorTube, a company based in Indiana, made a paid app and recruited a few established YouTubers. Like the others, it managed the costs of hosting video and other back-end services, splitting sales with video producers. In May, these producers received an email that JuniorTube had shut down "due to very poor business performance and audience interest." To contact the author of this story: Mark Bergen in San Francisco at mbergen10@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Emily Biuso at ebiuso@bloomberg.net, Alistair BarrFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • 4 Reasons Netflix Cancels Its Original Programs
    Motley Fool

    4 Reasons Netflix Cancels Its Original Programs

    The company has been canceling a lot more shows than it used to.

  • Better Buy Amid Market Volatility: Amazon (AMZN) vs. Walmart (WMT) Stock
    Zacks

    Better Buy Amid Market Volatility: Amazon (AMZN) vs. Walmart (WMT) Stock

    Let's take a look at which stock, Amazon (AZMN) vs. Walmart (WMT), looks like a better buy amid market volatility...

  • American City Business Journals

    These 5 Bay Area companies are Bank of America's picks to best survive a recession

    A new Bank of America Merrill Lynch report lays out a dozen stocks to have during the recession. Half of them are for companies either based in Silicon Valley or that have a strong presence here.

  • Apple Roasted On Social Media For Rumored Apple TV+ Pricing
    Investor's Business Daily

    Apple Roasted On Social Media For Rumored Apple TV+ Pricing

    Consumers expressed surprise and disappointment online that Apple is weighing a $9.99 monthly subscription price for its upcoming Apple TV+ service. Apple stock rose a fraction.

  • ACCESSWIRE

    CLASS ACTION UPDATE for VNTR, TEVA and NFLX: Levi & Korsinsky, LLP Reminds Investors of Class Actions on Behalf of Shareholders

    NEW YORK, NY / ACCESSWIRE / August 20, 2019 / Levi & Korsinsky, LLP announces that class action lawsuits have commenced on behalf of shareholders of the following publicly-traded companies. To determine ...

  • GlobeNewswire

    SHAREHOLDER ALERT: Pomerantz Law Firm Reminds Shareholders with Losses on their Investment Netflix, Inc. of Class Action Lawsuit and Upcoming Deadline – NFLX

    Pomerantz LLP announces that a class action lawsuit has been filed against Netflix, Inc. (“Netflix” or the “Company”) (NFLX) and certain of its officers. The class action, filed in United States District Court, for the Northern District of California, and indexed under 19-cv-04395, is on behalf of a class consisting of all persons and entities who purchased or otherwise acquired the publicly traded securities of Netflix between April 17, 2019 and July 17, 2019, both dates inclusive (the “Class Period”). Plaintiff seeks to recover compensable damages caused by Defendants’ violations of the federal securities laws and to pursue remedies under Sections 10(b) and 20(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (the “Exchange Act”) and Rule 10b-5 promulgated thereunder.

  • 10 Stocks That Every 30-Year-Old Should Buy and Hold Forever
    InvestorPlace

    10 Stocks That Every 30-Year-Old Should Buy and Hold Forever

    [Editor's note: "10 Stocks That Every 30-Year-Old Should Buy and Hold Forever" was previously published in April 2019. It has since been updated to include the most relevant information available.]By the age of 30, you should already have nearly a decade's worth of retirement savings under your belt. If you don't, you're not alone. A recent GoBankingRates survey showed that nearly half of the millennials questioned had no retirement savings at all.If you fall into that camp, keep in mind the old saying "better late than never," because it absolutely applies if you're only just starting to build a nest egg. If you just hit the big 3-0 and you've already been saving and investing for years, bravo; however, 30 is a great milestone to look over your investments and rebalance your portfolio with some of the best long-term stocks out there. InvestorPlace - Stock Market News, Stock Advice & Trading TipsUnlike in your 20s, risk is a much larger consideration a decade later. The market is bound to go up and down, and you have to assess whether or not you could handle a market-wide pullback. Moreover, you will want to keep some powder dry to buy on a dip. Income stocks that pay dividends become important stocks to buy at this stage, but choosing some riskier players shouldn't be completely off the table. * 10 Undervalued Stocks With Breakout Potential Of course, investors in their 30s should be holding some of their money in an index fund that will provide conservative growth. But here's a look at ten of the best long-term stocks to buy if you're in your 30s: Best Long-Term Stocks to Buy: Disney (DIS)I recommended Disney (NYSE:DIS) stock when the company's share price dipped below $100 following a racist tweet from Roseanne Barr, the star of one of the company's most successful sitcoms back in 2018. Disney responded by immediately canceling the show and distancing itself from Barr's hateful outburst, but investors worried that the loss of advertising from the canceled show would hurt advertising income.Since then, the market has come to its senses and DIS stock is back to trading above $135 per share.There are a few reasons Disney is one of the best long-term stocks to buy if you're building a portfolio in your 30s. The first is that the company is ripe for a major comeback.Disney is a solid company with a great deal of cash behind it. That means that even in the worst-case scenario, the firm has the money to spend on building out a streaming service from scratch and weather any storms that loom over the media space in the future. The firm also pays a respectable 1.3% dividend yield that will help balance out concerns about growth due to the firm's size. Netflix (NFLX)Another player in the streaming space worth considering one of the best long-term stocks to buy is Netflix (NASDAQ:NFLX).If you missed the boat on NFLX back in 2015 when shares were trading below $50, it might be a hard pill to swallow, but NFLX is still an excellent long-term bet despite the fact that its share price is over $300 today.The reason is that Netflix still has a long growth runway before investors should start to worry about the company becoming too large to produce the kind of growth they've become accustomed to. A company like, say, Apple Inc. (NASDAQ:AAPL) has a market cap of nearly $900 billion, making it unlikely that the firm can continue to grow at the same clip over the next decade. Netflix's market cap of $150 billion leaves plenty of space for the firm to catch up to its fellow FAANG peers over the next decade. * 10 Undervalued Stocks With Breakout Potential NFLX has the growth potential to do so as well. The company has proven that it has a good grasp on the population's ever-changing tastes, and although it has been expensive, Netflix's original content has been a huge draw for subscribers. While the U.S. market has been saturated, NFLX has only just begun its international expansion, leaving a long growth runway for the next few years.Over the past two years, Netflix has been preparing for a major push overseas, and those efforts are due to pay off over the next decade. GHB Insights' head of technology research Daniel Ives said he sees Netflix international expansion opening a potential market of 700 million subscribers in the next 2 years.So, although the streaming space is certainly getting more crowded, NFLX appears to have created a winning formula that makes it one of the best long-term stocks to buy and hold on to. Procter & Gamble (PG)Procter & Gamble (NYSE:PG) is one such stock to buy that, although boring, is a buy-and-hold-until-you-retire kind of stock.As I mentioned above, risk assessment is a huge part of building your portfolio in your 30s, and although you still have plenty of time to let risky bets play out, you should be thinking about adding some low-risk, solid stocks to your portfolio that will keep ticking along as the years go by.What makes PG stock one of the best long-term stocks to buy is that the company's management has a long history of maintaining a healthy cashflow and delivering shareholder returns and its 2.90% dividend yield will provide a reliable income.Not only that but PG's widely diversified business offers investors some security in times of economic trouble. Plus, PG sells a wide variety of necessities like toothpaste and soap, which are unlikely to take much of a hit even in the case of a recession.Increased competition is definitely something to keep in mind when considering PG, but the firm's strong financial position means it has the leeway to refocus its strategy and continue thriving in difficult conditions. Exxon Mobil (XOM)If you haven't started wading back into oil and gas stocks yet, now's your chance. And Exxon Mobil (NYSE:XOM) is one of the best long-term stocks to buy for a few reasons.Now that oil prices are starting to recover, it's worth revisiting the industry. The crash in crude oil prices helped weed out weaker firms and those that survived are coming back stronger than ever with more efficient operations and better future prospects. However, worries about oversupply are still in the forefront of investors mind, which has kept the sector from becoming too expensive.First, XOM's share price is still well below its 2015 highs, giving it plenty of room for a turnaround in the coming years. XOM stock is also working on an aggressive new strategy that includes a $2 billion pipeline in the Permian Basin. The firm also sees potential opportunities in Guyana and Brazil which are expected to help XOM ramp up production significantly over the next few years.Of course, oil prices will play a major role in whether or not XOM's plans are successful, but what's nice about owning Exxon shares is the fact that the company's integrated structure means it's not a direct oil play. So, although that means XOM won't see the same kinds of gains some of its peers do if oil prices spike, that also means it won't suffer the same losses should the opposite occur. * 10 Undervalued Stocks With Breakout Potential XOM also pays out a 5.1% dividend that has been raised every year for the past 36, taking the edge off some of the risk. Walmart (WMT)Discount superstore Walmart (NYSE:WMT) is often overlooked by investors because Amazon.com (NASDAQ:AMZN) tends to be their first choice. While I don't disagree that Amazon is still one of the best long-term stocks to buy, worries about WMT's future are largely overdone.Since being scathed by the ecommerce takeover a few years ago, WMT stock has made an impressive recovery and although the firm is still facing some headwinds, it's a solid stock to buy.Judging by the company's improving e-commerce sales, it looks like Walmart is on the right track to competing against the likes of Amazon. Amazon (AMZN)You'd have to be living under a rock to not have heard all the buzz surrounding Amazon over the past few years. If you haven't jumped on the AMZN stock bandwagon yet, though, there might still be time. Of course, you'd be much better off if you'd bought Amazon stock in 2012 when it was trading at just $200 per share, but the company still is one of the best long-term stocks to buy today.It might seem counterintuitive to consider AMZN when you look at the firm's massive $895 billion market cap and the fact that the company pays absolutely no dividends. Not to mention, AMZN stock has proven to be extremely volatile. However in your 30s you've still got time, and that means there's space in your portfolio for a little bit of wiggle room if you're comfortable with it.Aside from its dominance in e-commerce, Amazon is also a top dog in cloud computing, an industry destined to grow exponentially over the next few years. On top of that, AMZN is spreading its wings in a wide variety of industries including grocery and logistics and there are even rumors that the firm is working to make its way into the healthcare space as well. * 10 Undervalued Stocks With Breakout Potential It's hard to imagine AMZN's market cap getting much larger, but 30-somethings would be remiss not to consider Amazon stock to juice up their gains over the next five or 10 years. Berkshire Hathaway (BRK.B)It would be impossible to talk about the best long-term stocks without including Berkshire Hathaway Inc. (NYSE:BRK.B), run by legendary investor Warren Buffett. Of course, if you're 30 and just picking up Berkshire Hathaway stock now, then you're about to miss the boat in terms of benefiting from Buffett's infamous investing sense. However, that doesn't make BRK.B a bad long-term pick. The company has new fund managers at the helm who've already started taking over some of the firm's investment decisions and you can't argue with the value the firm already possesses. Berkshire has a roundup of defensive stocks that will help the firm ride out troubled markets, but the firm will also keep up with upward market trends. If nothing else, Berkshire stock is a great stabilizer that will round out your portfolio and mitigate against major market events making it one of the best long-term stocks 30-something crowd. Unilever (UN)Another consumer products stock to add to your list of the best long-term stocks is Unilever (NYSE:UN). The company has become massively efficient after undergoing major cost-cutting initiatives over the past few years in order to better compete as the industry became more and more competitive.That bodes well for the future because it means the company will be well prepared in the event of a recession, not to mention that the company sells a wide variety of basic necessities, which tend to continue selling even when purse strings are tight. * 10 Undervalued Stocks With Breakout Potential Another reason UN makes for a good stock to buy is the firm's presence in emerging markets. In 2017, more than half of the company's reported sales came from emerging markets. The company's huge footprint within emerging markets sets it apart from its peers because it creates a great long-term growth runway that others don't have access to. Microsoft (MSFT)Another steady-stock to buy in your 30s is Microsoft (NASDAQ:MSFT). Like a few others on this list, MSFT stock isn't exactly the most exciting stock, but it will do its job and make you some money. Unlike others in the IT industry, MSTF is mature which, in this case, translates to stability rather than falling out of touch with what consumers want. Right now MSFT is working to pivot away from its traditional software business and focusing on growth in its cloud business, which includes subscriptions like Office 365 as well as Azure, Microsoft's answer to Amazon Web Services. Growth in that arm of MSFT's business has been strong. With a P/E of 27 and a dividend yield of just 1.33%, there's no doubting that MSFT is an expensive stock, but you're paying a premium for a well run, solid business that has and will continue to withstand the test of time. Waste Management (WM)It's all well and good to invest in the next hot tech trend or retail story, but if you really want to make a play on future trends then look no further than Waste Management (NYSE:WM), the company that handles everyone's garbage. One thing is for certain, over the next few decades people are going to generate waste, and WM will be there to dispose of it. That makes it one of the best long-term stocks to buy.Not only does WM have a wide moat because of the regulatory permits it holds and its huge network of landfills, but the firm has also diversified its business to offer more than just waste collection and landfill maintenance. Waste Management also handles recycling and has been developing a way to turn landfill gas into energy. That means that as greener living continues to gain traction, WM will benefit as well. * 5 Stocks to Buy With High-Margin Recurring Revenue However, perhaps the most alluring reason to add WM stock to your portfolio is the firm's 1.7% dividend yield. The company has been raising its dividend annually for the past 15 years and there's no reason to expect that to stop anytime soon.As of this writing, Laura Hoy was long AMZN, AAPL, UN and NFLX. More From InvestorPlace * 2 Toxic Pot Stocks You Should Avoid * 10 Cheap Dividend Stocks to Load Up On * The 10 Biggest Losers from Q2 Earnings * 5 Dependable Dividend Stocks to Buy The post 10 Stocks That Every 30-Year-Old Should Buy and Hold Forever appeared first on InvestorPlace.

  • Apple's TV Splurge Just Adds to the Madness
    Bloomberg

    Apple's TV Splurge Just Adds to the Madness

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Get ready, TV fans, because the next few months are going to be wild. Apple Inc., AT&T Inc., Netflix Inc. and Walt Disney Co. are spending billions of dollars on so much new streaming content that there will be little reason to leave your couch this winter – or to keep your cable subscription.Apple gave a taste yesterday of what it’s been working on by releasing a trailer for “The Morning Show,” an original series that looks so good it could easily be mistaken for an HBO production. With an all-star cast led by Jennifer Aniston, Reese Witherspoon and Steve Carell, Apple is said to be spending $300 million alone for the first two seasons. The company has committed a whopping $6 billion overall to produce original shows and movies, according to the Financial Times, which would match what Netflix spent in 2017 and would also be in the same ballpark as Amazon.com Inc.’s expected content investment for this year. Other outlets have disputed that Apple’s budget is quite so large. Either way, it’s clear the iPhone maker is serious about streaming. The Apple TV+ and Disney+ video-on-demand apps will both be available by mid-November, followed by AT&T’s HBO Max product. They are game-changers for the pay-TV industry, already littered with live-TV streaming products from Sling TV to YouTube TV.Disney has spent about $15 million per episode to make “The Mandalorian,” a live-action “Star Wars” series that will serve as the flagship of Disney+, according to the Wall Street Journal. That’s about $120 million for the first season, which isn’t far from what Disney shelled out for “Captain Marvel,” the third-biggest movie of the year in terms of U.S. box-office ticket sales. The company expects to invest more than $1 billion in original content for the app next year and another roughly $1 billion for licensed content. These streaming wars are risky. Studio owners generally have a sense of what a TV program could deliver in advertising revenue and how large of a theater audience a film might draw. But Disney+ will charge just $7 a month and contain no ads. The company is betting it can build a large enough customer base so that all these pricey investments that have shareholders wincing right now will pay off some day.In the Apple TV trailer above, Aniston’s character at one point says, “I just need to be able to control the narrative so that I am not written out of it.” It struck me as funny because that’s exactly what Disney and its peers are trying to do as they flood the market with content and turn a blind eye to the cost. Disney predicts it will have 60 million to 90 million Disney+ subscribers globally by the end of fiscal 2024, when the app finally begins making money. Analysts see Apple TV+ topping 100 million in the next five years, according to Bloomberg News. While both are starting from zero, they do have the advantage of strong, far-reaching customer relationships – Disney through its movies and theme parks, and Apple by physically being in most of our pockets already. Netflix is protecting its turf by lighting it on fire. It’s projected to spend about $15 billion for in-house and licensed content this year while burning $3 billion of free cash flow. The company paid $100 million just to keep “Friends” on its platform through 2019. Even though the sitcom hasn’t aired new episodes in more than 15 years, it’s the second-most-watched program on Netflix. After this year, AT&T is reclaiming the rights to the show for its HBO Max product.A little over a year ago, Casey Bloys, HBO’s programming chief, referred to such spending as “irrational exuberance.” But then earlier this year, his boss, HBO Chairman Richard Plepler, left the company in a shake-up by its new parent AT&T. HBO is now ramping up its production slate to reduce churn, or the rate at which bored subscribers are canceling, and HBO Max is reportedly paying $425 million to carry “Friends” for five years starting in 2020. Likewise, the Wall Street Journal reported that Comcast Corp.’s NBCUniversal has its own $500 million five-year exclusive rights deal for “The Office,” the No. 1 show on Netflix. There is a potential fallacy in the companies’ thinking around these lavish deals: What if Netflix subscribers were streaming “Friends” and “The Office” for hours on end simply for background noise, something to mindlessly tune in and out of as they scrolled Instagram or did chores? In that case, perhaps users won’t necessarily miss those specific shows and won’t switch to other services at a rate that would come close to justifying nearly $1 billion for two old sitcoms. In any case, I keep writing about the frustration of needing to pay for and toggle between numerous apps just to access all your favorite content and the confusion that comes with doing so. It’s only going to get worse once Apple TV+, Disney+ and HBO Max launch. But at least there will be no shortage of stuff to watch, and with all this money being thrown around, you know it’ll be good. To contact the author of this story: Tara Lachapelle at tlachapelle@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Beth Williams at bewilliams@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Tara Lachapelle is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering deals, Berkshire Hathaway Inc., media and telecommunications. She previously wrote an M&A column for Bloomberg News.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Netflix and Video Streaming: Why So Much Is Against It
    Market Realist

    Netflix and Video Streaming: Why So Much Is Against It

    Some US mobile network operators slow down connection speeds for Netflix (NFLX) customers, a study shows. However, it's not alone.

  • Is Netflix Stock A Buy Right Now? Here's What NFLX Earnings, Charts Show
    Investor's Business Daily

    Is Netflix Stock A Buy Right Now? Here's What NFLX Earnings, Charts Show

    Netflix stock flattened out since January. That helped in the stock market correction. But can it regain its former leadership now that we have an uptrend?

  • Apple Stock Is Undervalued, but It’s a Tough Road to Upside
    InvestorPlace

    Apple Stock Is Undervalued, but It’s a Tough Road to Upside

    Apple (NASDAQ:AAPL) stock is up nearly 36% year-to-date. Shares currently trade around $211, and are moving closer to their all-time high of $233.47. But with looming trade risks and slowing growth, how can AAPL move the needle?Source: Shutterstock With a nearly trillion-dollar market cap, shares are not going to double anytime soon. But can investors expect material upside in AAPL stock? Let's take a closer look, and see if investors can find opportunity in Apple stock today. Recent News For Apple StockApple announced earnings on July 30. Sales growth was minimal year-over-year. Revenue for the quarter ending June 30, 2019 was $53.8 billion, up slightly from $53.3 billion in the prior year's quarter. With product sales down 1.7% YoY, service revenue was responsible for the minimal revenue uptick. Service revenue for the quarter was $11.5 billion, up 12% YoY. With smartphone sales in decline, AAPL stock needs new revenue sources to sustain growth and move the needle.InvestorPlace - Stock Market News, Stock Advice & Trading Tips * 10 Undervalued Stocks With Breakout Potential A new product mix could help jolt up sales. Take "wearables" such as the smartwatch. Apple controls 25.8% of the market. Apple does not breakdown sales. But CEO Tim Cook remarked on the conference call that Apple had an "absolutely blowout quarter for Wearables."The wearables market provides significant runway, as the product has yet to reach critical mass. All bets are off whether these new products can replace declining iPhone sales. But, at the very least, they can help the company sustain its current product revenue.But how about the elephant in the room? I'm talking about the U.S.-China trade war. Looking beyond the headlines (and the tweets), how does the geopolitical situation impact Apple? While the company received a reprieve from looming tariffs, long-term dependence on China for manufacturing remains a material risk. Trade War Risks to AAPL StockWith the U.S.-China trade war continuing, Apple stock is caught in the middle. With the US.. placing a 10% tariffs on imported electronics, the company could experience headwinds. Luckily for Apple, the 10% tariff has been delayed until Dec. 15. This will prevent new tariffs from impacting sales during the holiday season. This proposed tariff could be prevented if the U.S. and China settle their disputes and negotiate a new trade deal.The trade war underscores the risk of Apple's Chinese manufacturing dependence. But Apple has options when it come to hedging against this geopolitical risk. The company is exploring ways to move iPhone manufacturing to other low-cost Asian markets. In fact, with wages rising long-term in China, this move is inevitable. Potential countries include India, Vietnam, and Malaysia.While this is a step in the right direction, moving production is not a one-step process. It takes time to develop the right outsourcing infrastructure. But it is a positive sign that Apple is taking proactive steps.How does this factor into the valuation of Apple stock? Let's see if AAPL stock is truly undervalued, or fairly priced given the risks and opportunities. AAPL Stock ValuationAs I mentioned in my previous article about Alphabet (NASDAQ:GOOG, NASDAQ:GOOGL), Apple sells for the lowest valuation of the "FAANG" stocks. Stagnant growth and size may justify this discount. Amazon (NASDAQ:AMZN), Facebook (NASDAQ:FB), and Netflix (NASDAQ:NFLX) continue to show considerable runway.But Apple is in the similar boat as Google: both companies have more cash than they can reinvest in the business. What does that mean for AAPL shareholders? The company needs to consider aggressive buybacks and dividends to move shares higher.The company bought back $17 billion worth of Apple stock last quarter. Based on the most recent financials, the company has over $210 billion in cash and marketable securities. The 2017 tax bill made it easier for Apple to repatriate its overseas cash hoard. Aggressive share buybacks and dividend increases would help improve the Apple stock price. Acquisitions could be another way Apple can generate growth. Apple's 12-figure war chest provides multiple pathways to boost the share price. Bottom Line on Apple StockWith shares trading at a forward price/earnings ratio (forward P/E) of 16.6, Apple stock is a bargain compared to its big tech peers. But slow growth and trade risks justify this discount. Nevertheless, there are emerging trends that could help jump-start growth. The wearables market has plenty of runway, allowing Apple to use smartwatch sales growth to counter iPhone sales declines.The U.S.-China trade war is far from over. But the current Apple stock price takes into account these risks. With the company looking for ways to diversify manufacturing geographically, the long-term China risks could be mitigated.But does all of this mean AAPL is a buy? For investors looking for a blue chip at a fair price, Apple stock could be a buy. But given the specter of a stock market correction in the near future, it may pay to wait before taking a position.As of this writing, Thomas Niel did not hold a position in any of the aforementioned securities. More From InvestorPlace * 2 Toxic Pot Stocks You Should Avoid * 10 Cheap Dividend Stocks to Load Up On * The 10 Biggest Losers from Q2 Earnings * 5 Dependable Dividend Stocks to Buy The post Apple Stock Is Undervalued, but It's a Tough Road to Upside appeared first on InvestorPlace.

  • TheStreet.com

    [video]Apple Will Reportedly Spend $6B on Original Content; Should It Be Spending More?

    Despite its vast resources, Apple is smart to start off gradually before ramping up spending to compete with Netflix and Disney, according to an analyst and an Apple investor.