NOKIA.HE - Nokia Corporation

Helsinki - Helsinki Real Time Price. Currency in EUR
4.6420
-0.0430 (-0.92%)
At close: 6:29PM EEST
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Previous Close4.6850
Open4.6605
Bid4.6290 x 0
Ask4.6315 x 0
Day's Range4.5915 - 4.6745
52 Week Range4.1700 - 5.7420
Volume11,845,521
Avg. Volume14,509,384
Market Cap25.989B
Beta (3Y Monthly)0.85
PE Ratio (TTM)N/A
EPS (TTM)-0.0940
Earnings DateOct 24, 2019
Forward Dividend & Yield0.20 (4.27%)
Ex-Dividend Date2019-10-28
1y Target Est5.69
  • Eco-Friendly Phone Companies Brace for 5G’s Energy Bill
    Bloomberg

    Eco-Friendly Phone Companies Brace for 5G’s Energy Bill

    (Bloomberg) -- The next generation of telecommunications technology could be the key to ending years of stagnation in the industry. But it’s also set to create a difficult dilemma for European phone companies.Carriers shelled out $80 billion to power the world’s antennas last year, according to Nokia Oyj. The prospect of having to raise spending on electricity – energy demand could triple with the introduction of 5G equipment, according to industry body GSMA – won’t sit well with phone companies that are already struggling to pay their dividends. At the same time, firms such as BT Group Plc and Vodafone Group Plc have pledged to slash emissions, and that will require a rapid shift to renewable energy.Just as carriers are about to roll out vast quantities of power-hungry gear, they’re also promising to save the planet. And funds are tight. Accomplishing everything at the same time could be a tall order.“If they have set up ambitious targets for overall power consumption and CO2 emissions, those could potentially be in conflict when they start to roll out 5G,” said Jerker Berglund, industry consultant at JB Sustainable Approach AB. “Reducing total power consumption is going to be a challenge.”5G could unleash a 1,000-fold jump in data demand for connecting factories and cars and supercharging mobile devices, according to the GSMA. That’s an irresistible sales prospect for a telecom industry whose revenues have yet to recover from a slump that started in 2015.Next-generation antennas and masts can be 10 times more energy efficient than 4G’s. However, these power savings could get swamped by the surge in demand for new applications. 5G will link up billions of things that have never been connected before. To accommodate all these new connections, masts might have as many as 128 antennas, versus just four or eight on a typical 4G mast. Bouncing signals through cities may require thousands of transmitters and receivers to be bolted onto rooftops and street furniture. This looks like it will all require a lot more bandwidth, and a lot more power.What’s more, carriers can’t afford the cost of swapping out all their equipment at once, Berglund said. The rollout will have to happen gradually, so many masts will still carry less efficient 4G, 3G and 2G antennas alongside 5G ones. This situation could last for years – some 3G kit is still in place 18 years after that technology was introduced.This article is part of Covering Climate Now, a global collaboration of more than 250 news outlets to highlight the climate change story.Electricity already makes up about a third of carriers’ average operational costs, according to Nokia, and raising this will pressure balance sheets when the industry isn’t in a good place to cope. Vodafone has cut its dividend to conserve cash to pay for spectrum and capital investment. Bank of America Merrill Lynch analysts said Monday they expect BT to slash its dividend by as much as 40% to fund capital expenditure and price cuts.“As we consume more, power’s going up, and the industry is trying to bring that down as much as possible,” said Henry Calvert, head of future networks at the GSMA, the mobile industry trade body. “There’s a lot of activity in the industry about making the power we use more efficient.”But whatever fixes carriers make to lower energy bills – sharing networks, getting masts to autonomously power down at times of low data demand, introducing “beam-forming’’ so smart antennas can pinpoint devices instead of pumping out data indiscriminately – the surge in power usage creates a challenge for meeting emissions goals.Deutsche Telekom AG, for example, pledged a 90% reduction in carbon emissions between 2017 and 2030. In total, European carriers will have to reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 6 million metric tons within 11 years to achieve their carbon targets, BloombergNEF analyst Kyle Harrison said in a research note.One solution is for the telecom companies to shift their power supply to renewables, but this can’t be done at the flick of a switch. Clean-energy contracts are complicated and can take years to negotiate.Carriers will be under pressure to sign new ones quickly to cope with 5G’s power demands, Harrison said. They’ll be vulnerable to striking bad deals, and price fluctuations in energy markets can turn some arrangements that initially look good into losers in the longer term. “The switch to 5G is going to put more pressure on telecoms to purchase clean energy and reduce their emissions,” he said. “Many clean energy deals can result in losses for corporations. Telecoms will need to put extra consideration into this as their power demand goes up, especially if losses will impact their investments into 5G.”To contact the author of this story: Thomas Seal in London at tseal@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Jennifer Ryan at jryan13@bloomberg.netFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Is Nokia Corporation (HEL:NOKIA) Expensive For A Reason? A Look At Its Intrinsic Value
    Simply Wall St.

    Is Nokia Corporation (HEL:NOKIA) Expensive For A Reason? A Look At Its Intrinsic Value

    Does the August share price for Nokia Corporation (HEL:NOKIA) reflect what it's really worth? Today, we will estimate...

  • Bloomberg

    Vietnam Prefers Its Mobile Networks to Be Free of Huawei

    (Bloomberg) -- Vietnam is intent on being the first Asean nation to provide a 5G network -- without China’s tech powerhouse Huawei Technologies Inc.Viettel Group, Vietnam’s largest mobile carrier owned by the Defense Ministry, will deploy Ericsson AB’s equipment in Hanoi and Nokia Oyj’s technology in Ho Chi Minh City, said Viettel Chief Executive Officer Le Dang Dung. It will use 5G chipsets from Qualcomm Inc. and another U.S. company. The carrier, which uses Ericsson and Nokia for its 4G network, is also developing its own equipment, he added.“We are not going to work with Huawei right now,” Dung said in an interview at the company’s Hanoi headquarters. “It’s a bit sensitive with Huawei now. There were reports that it’s not safe to use Huawei. So Viettel’s stance is that, given all this information, we should just go with the safer ones. So we choose Nokia and Ericsson from Europe.”Vietnam’s smaller carriers appear to be shying away from Huawei, as well. MobiFone Corp. is using Samsung Electronics Co. equipment while Vietnam Telecom Services Company, or Vinaphone, entered into a partnership with Nokia to deploy its 5G network, according to local media.“I think Huawei is having difficulties in Vietnam right now, since other companies don’t use them as well,” said Dung, whose carrier has about 60 million customers in the nation of about 96 million people.The Shenzhen-based company counters such concerns by pointing out that governments and customers in 170 countries use its equipment, which poses no greater cybersecurity threat than communications technology from any other vendor. Huawei expects the U.S. restrictions will lower consumer devices revenue by about $10 billion.“If we have favorable information regarding Huawei in the future, we will consider using their network equipment again,” Dung said. The Southeast Asian country is quietly siding with the Trump administration, which has barred Huawei from buying U.S. technology over national-security concerns. Vietnam’s decision to shun Huawei appears to make it an outlier in Southeast Asia, where other countries such as the Philippines, Thailand and Malaysia are open to deploying Huawei’s technology.Dung insisted Viettel’s decision not to use Huawei for its 5G networks was a technological one and not tied to geopolitical considerations.“We decided not to use Huawei, not because of the U.S.’s ban on Huawei -- we just made our own decision,” he said. “Many other countries, including the U.S., have found evidence that showed using Huawei is not safe for the security of the national network. So we need to be more cautious.”Still, Vietnam’s government has in the past cast suspicions over technology from neighboring China.Government officials vowed to review the use of Chinese technology in 2016 after cyber attacks on the nation’s two major airports in Ho Chi Minh City and Hanoi that they blamed on a hacker group from China.Years of territorial disputes between the two Communist countries have eroded trust in China among Vietnamese. A Pew opinion poll released in 2017 found just 10% of Vietnamese view China favorably.Maritime TensionThe Southeast Asian nation is already involved in a tense standoff with Beijing over the presence of a Chinese surveying ship along with Coast Guard escorts in oil-producing waters off Vietnam’s coast. In mid-2014, China dragged an exploration oil rig into contested waters off Vietnam, leading to deadly anti-China protests in Vietnam.“Vietnam can’t trust China,” said Le Hong Hiep, a fellow at the Singapore-based ISEAS-Yusof Ishak Institute. “They can’t risk their critical infrastructure just because they offer something cheaper than other companies.”Excluding Huawei could limit Viettel’s pricing and technology options, said Nikhil Batra, a senior telecom research analyst at IDC.“Huawei is deeply entrenched in this stuff,” Batra said. The Chinese company is more technologically advanced in 5G networks in some areas than its competitors, he said. “But they have to face all these headwinds in terms of security.”As mobile networks become more entwined with a country’s economic and national security, governments are taking a closer look at what technology is deployed.“Governments treat telecommunications just like utilities and water pipes -- as national infrastructure assets,” Batra said. “Everything is dependent on networks.”Vietnam has another reason to avoid Huawei technology: its desire to increase security and economic ties with the U.S., said Carl Thayer, emeritus professor with The University of New South Wales in Australia. Deploying the Huawei 5G infrastructure could make the U.S. reluctant to share some intelligence with Vietnam, he added.“The U.S. is putting pressure on every country not to get involved with Huawei,” Thayer said.(Updates with U.S. restrictions impact on Huawei in sixth paragraph.)To contact the reporters on this story: John Boudreau in Hanoi at jboudreau3@bloomberg.net;Nguyen Dieu Tu Uyen in Hanoi at uyen1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Daniel Ten Kate at dtenkate@bloomberg.net, Ruth Pollard, Sam NagarajanFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • How Trump's Huawei Decision Could Shake Up Tech Stocks
    Investopedia

    How Trump's Huawei Decision Could Shake Up Tech Stocks

    U.S. sanctions against Chinese tech giant Huawei were suspended through Monday, Aug. 19. What the Trump administration does next has big implications.

  • Director of Future X lab saw opportunity with 5G early on and hasn't stopped
    American City Business Journals

    Director of Future X lab saw opportunity with 5G early on and hasn't stopped

    While the ideas around 5G might seem futuristic, it’s a technology Nokia’s Monisha Jain has been contemplating for years.

  • Nokia says Brazil 5G auction may be world's biggest yet
    Reuters

    Nokia says Brazil 5G auction may be world's biggest yet

    Finnish telecoms equipment maker Nokia Oyj expects Brazil to host the world's biggest-ever single auction for fifth-generation (5G) spectrum next year, a senior executive told Reuters. After partnering with Uruguayan state-run carrier Antel to deploy the first 5G network in Latin America, Nokia is setting its sights on Brazil, its biggest market in the region. "We see the political will to carry out a large spectrum auction in the first quarter of 2020.

  • How 5G Is Powering Nokia’s and Ericsson’s Performances
    Market Realist

    How 5G Is Powering Nokia’s and Ericsson’s Performances

    5G technology is beginning to have a noticeable mark on Nokia's (NOK) and Ericsson's (ERIC) financial results.

  • Nokia Corporation (NOK) Q2 2019 Earnings Call Transcript
    Motley Fool

    Nokia Corporation (NOK) Q2 2019 Earnings Call Transcript

    NOK earnings call for the period ending June 30, 2019.

  • Why Nokia Stock Surged Today
    Motley Fool

    Why Nokia Stock Surged Today

    Solid growth set the stage for an improved second half.

  • Why AstraZeneca, Ambev, and Nokia Jumped Today
    Motley Fool

    Why AstraZeneca, Ambev, and Nokia Jumped Today

    Solid earnings lifted some stocks despite a big market downturn.

  • Nokia Closes Out a Weak First Half
    Motley Fool

    Nokia Closes Out a Weak First Half

    Results improved in the second quarter, but the company will need a solid second half to hit its guidance.

  • How Nokia Is Benefiting from Strong 5G Demand
    Market Realist

    How Nokia Is Benefiting from Strong 5G Demand

    Shares of leading telecommunications equipment company Nokia (NOK) are up 8.0% so far on July 25. The stock is currently trading at $5.59.

  • Benzinga

    Nokia Trades Higher After Q2 Earnings Beat

    Nokia Oyj (NYSE: NOK ) traded higher Thursday morning after reporting a top- and bottom-line second-quarter earnings beat. What Happened Nokia said it earned 0.05 euros per share in the second quarter ...

  • Nokia second-quarter beats forecasts on solid demand; maintains outlook
    Reuters

    Nokia second-quarter beats forecasts on solid demand; maintains outlook

    Nokia reported April-June underlying earnings per share of 0.05 euros, compared with an average forecast of 0.03 euros in a Refinitiv poll. The telecom network industry has faced slowing demand since 4G network sales peaked in the middle of the decade, but a new cycle of network upgrades appear to be kicking in as demand for 5G technology increases. Nokia maintained its forecasts of full-year earnings per share at 0.25-0.29 euros, and 2020 EPS of 0.37-0.42 euros.

  • Reuters

    UPDATE 2-Nokia beats forecasts as 5G sales start to kick in

    Finnish telecom network equipment maker Nokia posted a surprise jump in second-quarter profit on Thursday and stuck to its 2019 earnings outlook as demand for next-generation 5G equipment boosted results. Despite what the company called a slow start to 2019 and an overall weak first half, it expects a strong fourth quarter as customer demand for 5G kit increases. "Demand is strong in lead 5G markets, US and Korea," CEO Rajeev Suri told a conference call, adding the market for new technology would start this year in Japan, the Middle East, China, the Nordics, Italy and the United Kingdom.

  • Nokia beats forecasts as 5G sales start to kick in
    Reuters

    Nokia beats forecasts as 5G sales start to kick in

    Finnish telecom network equipment maker Nokia posted a surprise jump in second-quarter profit on Thursday and stuck to its 2019 earnings outlook as demand for next-generation 5G equipment boosted results. Despite what the company called a slow start to 2019 and an overall weak first half, it expects a strong fourth quarter as customer demand for 5G kit increases. "Demand is strong in lead 5G markets, US and Korea," CEO Rajeev Suri told a conference call, adding the market for new technology would start this year in Japan, the Middle East, China, the Nordics, Italy and the United Kingdom.

  • What Kind Of Shareholder Appears On The Nokia Corporation's (HEL:NOKIA) Shareholder Register?
    Simply Wall St.

    What Kind Of Shareholder Appears On The Nokia Corporation's (HEL:NOKIA) Shareholder Register?

    Every investor in Nokia Corporation (HEL:NOKIA) should be aware of the most powerful shareholder groups. Institutions...

  • Nokia Careful Not to Upset Beijing as It Courts Huawei Customers
    Market Realist

    Nokia Careful Not to Upset Beijing as It Courts Huawei Customers

    The restrictions that Huawei is facing in Western countries are expected to benefit competitors such as Nokia.

  • GlobeNewswire

    Taiwan Star Telecom expands LTE services and prepares for 5G migration with Nokia end-to-end portfolio

    Espoo, Finland- Nokia today announced that TST (Taiwan Star Telecom) has chosen the Nokia end-to-end (E2E) solution to expand the coverage and capacity of its LTE network to support subscriber growth. The new solution will also enable TST to offer narrowband Internet of Things (IoT) services, as well as prepare TST to migrate to 5G services in the future.