NSRGF - Nestle S.A.

Other OTC - Other OTC Delayed Price. Currency in USD
105.51
+0.97 (+0.93%)
At close: 3:55PM EST
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Previous Close104.54
Open104.86
Bid0.00 x 0
Ask0.00 x 0
Day's Range102.85 - 105.51
52 Week Range78.57 - 114.93
Volume7,335
Avg. Volume15,592
Market Cap306.53B
Beta (3Y Monthly)0.35
PE Ratio (TTM)39.46
EPS (TTM)2.67
Earnings DateN/A
Forward Dividend & Yield2.43 (2.33%)
Ex-Dividend Date2019-04-15
1y Target EstN/A
  • Earnings: mixed menu from Nestlé, Unilever, Pernod
    Reuters Videos

    Earnings: mixed menu from Nestlé, Unilever, Pernod

    With not one but two consumer goods giants reporting ... Investors in the sector had a chance to do some comparison shopping on Thursday (October 17). First, Nestlé. Organic growth slowed in Q3, it said - overshadowing what normally would be share-positive news: An announcement of a plan to return 20 billion Swiss francs to investors - around 20 billion dollars - primarily through share buybacks. Nestlé was instead the biggest drag on Switzerland's benchmark index - its shares slipping over three quarters of a percent. Unilever rose. Adding a per cent and a half in early trade - in a UK share market subdued by Brexit worries ... Though sterling weakness on those worries has been good for the firm - making its exports cheaper. Turnover beat estimates with a near 6 per cent rise to just under 15 billion dollars. But a slowdown in India and China has dampened sales growth to 2.9 per cent - three had been expected. And emerging market sales - a key focus for Unilever - slipped. Drink also featured in the latest earnings.... Nestlé wants to reorganise its ailing bottled water business - whose brands include Perrier and San Pellegrino ... While French spirits maker Pernod Ricard also spoke of slower growth in India and China. Q1 sales overall were up 1.3 per cent on an underlying basis. Its shares on Thursday were over three per cent down.

  • Nestle Sees $250 Million Boost for Starbucks Products
    Bloomberg

    Nestle Sees $250 Million Boost for Starbucks Products

    (Bloomberg) -- Nestle SA expects to get about a quarter of a billion dollars in extra revenue from Starbucks-branded products this year after it began selling items including Nespresso-compatible capsules under a partnership with the U.S. coffee giant.Starbucks-branded merchandise will add about 250 million Swiss francs ($252 million) to sales this year, a spokesman said Tuesday in response to questions. Last year, Nestle paid more than $7 billion for licenses to use the Starbucks brand for products sold in grocery stores.The move has given a boost to Nespresso, where growth has eased due to competition from cheap imitation pods. Nestle has been hesitant to offer its coffee brand’s capsules in supermarkets because it prefers to keep control over how they’re sold. However, the Swiss company has been using the Starbucks tie-up as an avenue into grocery aisles.The alliance could help Nespresso return to annual revenue growth exceeding 10%, Patrice Bula, chairman of the brand, said in February. As part of the agreement, the world’s largest food company took over a $2 billion business that made Starbucks products for grocery stores.Nestle plans to add 10 more markets next year for the products, including Argentina, Colombia and Panama, which would bring the total to 50. The company will introduce Starbucks-branded soluble coffee next year and expand sales of the broader range to offices and hotels. (Updates last paragraph to include detail on expanded sales. An earlier version of this story corrected details of product in last paragraph.)To contact the reporter on this story: Corinne Gretler in Zurich at cgretler1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Eric Pfanner at epfanner1@bloomberg.net, John LauermanFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Barrons.com

    Alibaba Sold a Record Amount of Stuff on Singles Day. Apple and Lots of Other Brands Scored Too.

    The e-commerce giant sold $38.4 billion worth of products in 24 hours during its Singles Day shopping extravaganza, an increase of 26% compared with 2018.

  • Coca-Cola, Nestlé and Pepsi top this list of plastic violators, and there’s been a solar breakthrough from Sweden
    MarketWatch

    Coca-Cola, Nestlé and Pepsi top this list of plastic violators, and there’s been a solar breakthrough from Sweden

    Evidence of the increasing effects of climate change is building, as are the investing opportunities and changes in consumer habits linked to environmental concerns and resource use. Here are select dispatches about the companies responding to customer demands and climate risk, the ESG investors and their advisers, and the policy-makers, enterprising individuals and scientists preparing for tomorrow. BreakFreeFromPlastic, a three-year-old organization of some 1,800 members working to tackle plastic pollution has called in the volunteers that tally top plastic polluters by brand, and the amount of refuse clogging the world’s waterways remains alarming.

  • Bottlers Want to Profit From Your Tap Water
    Bloomberg

    Bottlers Want to Profit From Your Tap Water

    (Bloomberg) -- Over the past four decades, consumers around the world have chugged trillions of bottles of water from brands such as Perrier, Evian, Dasani, and Aquafina. Few realize that most of what they pay for is plastic and time on a truck. Companies typically get the water for free or just a nominal fee, and bottling the stuff and getting it to consumers—as well as advertising it—accounts for the bulk of their costs.Today, increasing concern about the carbon and plastic waste generated by that process is fueling a backlash that threatens the business. Across the industry, sales are softening and some towns are even banning plastic water bottles—spurring producers to respond with alternatives ranging from canned water to flavor pods for tap water to dispensers that sell sparkling and flavored mixes.“The waters business has to cope with a number of sustainability issues that are becoming increasingly important,” Nestle SA Chief Executive Officer Mark Schneider told analysts in October.Until the 1970s, bottled water was mostly sold in limited areas by European companies that tapped springs in the Alps. Then in 1973, DuPont patented PET plastic bottles, which were cheaper, lighter, and stronger than the glass that had been the industry standard. Combined with the rapidly globalizing economy, PET allowed water sellers to ship their wares much farther, opening up new markets. Bottlers sprung up in just about every country and the likes of Nestle, Coca-Cola, and PepsiCo added water to their portfolios, helping boost global revenue in the business to $130 billion last year, according to researcher Euromonitor.These days, things aren’t quite so bubbly as consumers grow increasingly aware of their carbon footprint. Danone, the maker of Evian, on Oct. 18 reported its biggest decline in quarterly water revenue in a decade. That same day, Coca-Cola Co. said water sales were lower than it expected.With shipments headed for a second annual decline, Nestle is reorganizing its bottled water business. Buffeted by lower-price rivals and high transport costs, Nestle raised prices—which sapped sales of its mass-market offerings such as Poland Spring and Pure Life as consumers shifted to cheaper generic brands. CEO Schneider has said the company wants to focus instead on higher-end products such as flavored and sparkling waters like its Perrier and San Pellegrino brands.More than 80 U.S. colleges and a handful of municipalities have restricted sales of bottled water. In Concord, Mass., it’s illegal to sell still water in small plastic bottles, and San Francisco bars such sales on city property. In the U.K., a non-profit called City to Sea has introduced an app that points thirsty users to places where they can get free water—with a pledge from chains such as Starbucks and Costa to refill bottles at no cost.“Producers face a real risk from the environmental movement, which has strong support among young people,” says Alain Oberhuber, an analyst at Mainfirst Bank, who predicts a sharp decline in sales of bottled water over the next two decades. “They know they have to do something.”With bottled water now outselling carbonated soft drinks in the U.S., one part of that “something” is aluminum cans filled with water. Coke introduced cans of Dasani in the northeast U.S. this year and plans to try selling it in aluminum bottles in 2020. Pepsi has been selling canned Aquafina at restaurants and stadiums and is testing it in stores. And Danone is trying the idea with local brands in Britain, Denmark, and Poland.The soda giants are also seeking to monetize consumption of tap water. Pepsi last year paid more than $3 billion for SodaStream, which produces systems for making fizzy water at home. And Pepsi has introduced a brand called Drinkfinity, which sells pods that attach to reusable bottles to infuse tap water with caffeine, vitamins, or electrolytes in a variety of flavors.  Coke is rolling out a water dispenser it calls Dasani PureFill, which allows consumers to refill their bottles with free filtered water and gives the option of adding flavors or carbonation for about $1 for a 20-ounce bottle. The company is planning to test the idea—and various prices—at roughly 100 locations such as offices, hospitals, and colleges.Nestle next year plans to introduce a dispenser it calls Refill Plus, which filters tap water and can add flavors and varying levels of carbonation,  and it’s working on a paper-based bottle that it says is fully biodegradable. Danone is exploring refill stations but for now is focusing on the home market with a new device that dispenses Evian delivered in balloon-like spheres that use less plastic than bottles.Producers are counting on such initiatives to appeal to consumers who consider branded water healthier than tap. Howard Telford, head of soft drinks at Euromonitor, says such efforts will have only a marginal effect on the industry’s carbon footprint. But he says adding extras such as flavorings and fizz may help shore up profits for the likes of Coke, Nestle, and Pepsi.“It points to a future,” Telford says, “where flavor, carbonation, and functional additives—rather than disposable packaging and simple convenience—could be the main value drivers in packaged water.”To contact the authors of this story: Thomas Mulier in Geneva at tmulier@bloomberg.netCorinne Gretler in Zurich at cgretler1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: David Rocks at drocks1@bloomberg.netFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Nestle to Weigh $1 Billion Sale of Local Chinese Brands
    Bloomberg

    Nestle to Weigh $1 Billion Sale of Local Chinese Brands

    (Bloomberg) -- Nestle SA is weighing options including a sale for two ailing Chinese units after years of attempting to turn them around, people familiar with the matter said.The food giant has been reviewing its ownership of Hsu Fu Chi, a local confectionery brand, and Yinlu, known for its ready-made Chinese porridge, according to the people. It is seeking more than $1 billion for its controlling stakes in the two companies, the people said, asking not to be identified because the information is private.Nestle acquired both companies in 2011 as it sought to tap burgeoning demand in China, only to find itself confronted with sluggish growth a few years later. Since becoming chief executive officer in 2017, Mark Schneider has been weeding out the Swiss company’s portfolio, jettisoning assets such as U.S. chocolate brands, a dermatology business and a life insurance unit for about $15 billion total.Nestle, which makes Nespresso coffee and Gerber baby food, has made almost two dozen divestments under Schneider. It could opt to sell only part of its stakes in one or both of the Chinese units, according to one of the people.Peanut Milk, ChocolateNo final decisions have been made, and there’s no certainty the deliberations will lead to a transaction, the people said. A spokesman for Nestle declined to comment. Mergermarket reported earlier that Nestle was conducting a strategic review of the Yinlu business, citing unidentified people.The two labels could fetch around 1.5 billion francs ($1.5 billion), MainFirst analyst Alain Oberhuber said in a note, adding that there’s a “high probability” they’ll be divested next year.“Both brands suffer fierce competition from local players,” he said.Nestle shares rose 0.3% early Wednesday in Zurich.Yinlu has sales of about 1 billion francs, Nestle said earlier this month. About two-thirds of the business is made up of local products like peanut milk and a porridge called congee, whose sales have been “disappointing,” the CEO said at the time. The rest is ready-to-drink coffee, which has been going better.“We’re working very, very hard to address that situation,” Schneider said on a call with analysts on Oct. 17. He has repeatedly said Nestle will sell businesses that are non-strategic if it’s not possible to fix them.Hsu Fu Chi, which makes confectionery products and snacks, probably generates annual revenue of some 700 million francs, according to Vontobel analyst Jean-Philippe Bertschy. Nestle has tried to improve the packaging of Hsu Fu Chi chocolates and added nutritious snacks to appeal to more health-conscious millennial consumers.(Updates with shares, analyst comment)To contact the reporters on this story: Vinicy Chan in New York at vchan91@bloomberg.net;Corinne Gretler in Zurich at cgretler1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Fion Li at fli59@bloomberg.net, ;Eric Pfanner at epfanner1@bloomberg.net, Thomas Mulier, Ben ScentFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Reuters

    UPDATE 1-As population grows, human diet must cut down on meat, sugar, salt -Nestlé exec

    Nestlé SA, one of the world's largest food processors, believes population growth will require human diets to adapt, reducing consumption of sugar, salt and meat products, an executive said on Wednesday. "We have 7.5 billion people and the population continues to grow, so there is a need to eat more vegetables, cereals, and less sugar, meat products," said Laurent Freixe, Executive Vice President and head of operations in the Americas.

  • As population grows, human diet must cut down on meat, sugar, salt - Nestlé exec
    Reuters

    As population grows, human diet must cut down on meat, sugar, salt - Nestlé exec

    Nestlé SA , one of the world's largest food processors, believes population growth will require human diets to adapt, reducing consumption of sugar, salt and meat products, an executive said on Wednesday. "We have 7.5 billion people and the population continues to grow, so there is a need to eat more vegetables, cereals, and less sugar, meat products," said Laurent Freixe, Executive Vice President and head of operations in the Americas.

  • INSIGHT-In hungry Venezuela, food producers step up exports to survive
    Reuters

    INSIGHT-In hungry Venezuela, food producers step up exports to survive

    Shrimp farming is booming in this western Venezuelan city, but little of the shellfish is destined for tables in this malnourished nation. About 90% of this shrimp is headed for Europe and Asia - with the blessing of President Nicolas Maduro. Venezuela's leader has lauded food exports on television as a way to raise hard currency to stabilize an economy in crisis.

  • Moody's

    Nestle Finance International Ltd. -- Moody's downgrades Nestlé to Aa3; stable outlook

    Moody's Investors Service ("Moody's") has today downgraded to Aa3 from Aa2 the issuer rating of Nestlé S.A., the world's largest food and beverage group. Concurrently, the agency has downgraded to Aa3 from Aa2 the senior unsecured long-term ratings of its guaranteed subsidiaries and affirmed the Prime-1 (P-1) short-term ratings. The rating action follows the announcement on 17 October that the company plans to undertake an additional CHF 20 billion share buyback to be completed over the next three years.

  • Market Exclusive

    Market Weekend: Brexit Purgatory, Syria Troops to Iraq, J&J Arsenic, JPMorgan ‘Big Liquidity Thing’

    Brexit Purgatory Continues As the world turns, so the Brexit saga continues. Futures traders are now betting the odds of first contact with an alien species of hyperintelligent snails is more likely than this chapter ever being closed. (This is not to be taken literally.) SEE: AMP Signs Cannabis Distribution Agreement with CC Pharma What happened […]The post Market Weekend: Brexit Purgatory, Syria Troops to Iraq, J&J Arsenic, JPMorgan ‘Big Liquidity Thing’ appeared first on Market Exclusive.

  • Unilever and Nestle sales hit by China slowdown
    MarketWatch

    Unilever and Nestle sales hit by China slowdown

    European consumer goods giants Unilever and Nestle both reported slowing sales growth in China as the pair posted mixed results.

  • Barrons.com

    Nestlé to Refresh Bottled-Water Business as Sales Turn Flat

    The world’s biggest packaged-food maker said its water arm, which sells brands including Poland Spring, San Pellegrino, Pure Life and Perrier, would go from being a stand-alone, globally managed business with headquarters in France, to one managed locally in Nestlé’s various regions. It also said the head of Nestlé Waters, Maurizio Patarnello, would leave the company by the end of the year. The change mimics a restructuring Chief Executive Mark Schneider pushed through for Nestlé’s infant-nutrition arm, where the company says results have since improved.

  • Emerging markets come off the boil for Nestle and Unilever
    Reuters

    Emerging markets come off the boil for Nestle and Unilever

    ZURICH/LONDON (Reuters) - Global consumer goods companies have been banking on emerging markets to drive their growth, so signs on Thursday that sales have come off the boil in the once-booming economies of China and India could set alarm bells ringing. Unilever, Nestle and drinks group Pernod Ricard all pointed to slower progress in key Asian markets as a factor for muted sales growth over the last three months but for the time being are keeping targets intact. Packaged goods companies like these have been relying more on emerging markets to offset changing habits in developed economies, where growing numbers of consumers are turning to fresher foods, niche brands or cutting back on spending.

  • 4 European Consumer Packaged Goods Companies to Consider for the 4th Quarter
    GuruFocus.com

    4 European Consumer Packaged Goods Companies to Consider for the 4th Quarter

    Stocks are trading below Peter Lynch value Continue reading...

  • Reuters

    UPDATE 1-Nestle, P&G say they will miss 2020 deforestation goals

    The world's two largest consumer goods companies, Nestle SA and Procter & Gamble Co, have acknowledged they will fall short of goals to use only those ingredients that do not contribute to deforestation in their products by 2020. Hundreds of companies have made 2020 zero deforestation pledges, according to the group.

  • Nestle launches plant-based burger in the United States
    Reuters

    Nestle launches plant-based burger in the United States

    The announcement by the Swiss-based company coincided with the launch of tests of Beyond Meat patties in North American restaurants by McDonalds, which is Nestle's partner in the plant-based category in Germany. Nestle's Sweet Earth brand will also roll out "Awesome Grounds," made with the same plant-based protein that goes in to the burgers.