NSRGY - Nestlé S.A.

Other OTC - Other OTC Delayed Price. Currency in USD
110.04
+1.19 (+1.09%)
At close: 3:59PM EDT
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous Close108.85
Open109.55
Bid0.00 x 0
Ask0.00 x 0
Day's Range109.55 - 110.49
52 Week Range78.62 - 110.60
Volume282,180
Avg. Volume372,837
Market Cap319.258B
Beta (3Y Monthly)0.46
PE Ratio (TTM)41.15
EPS (TTM)2.67
Earnings DateN/A
Forward Dividend & Yield2.42 (2.23%)
Ex-Dividend Date2019-04-15
1y Target Est120.80
Trade prices are not sourced from all markets
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  • The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Starbucks, Dunkin' and McDonald's
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  • A new Swedish bicycle is made from 300 recycled Nespresso pods
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    A new Swedish bicycle is made from 300 recycled Nespresso pods

    It's the latest attempt at repurposing the billions of single-use coffee capsules thrown away each year.

  • Coffee Stock Wars: Starbucks, McDonald's, Dunkin' & Upstarts
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  • Nestle starts selling Starbucks-branded coffee in China
    Reuters

    Nestle starts selling Starbucks-branded coffee in China

    Food giant Nestle on Thursday started selling Starbucks-branded coffee in mainland China, seeking to tap growth in a market where it says coffee consumption per capita remains low compared to global standards. Nestle last year paid $7.15 billion for exclusive rights to sell the U.S. chain's coffees and teas globally, and began selling Starbucks-labelled products in Europe, Asia and Latin America in February. The world's largest food company will start selling 21 Starbucks-branded capsule and instant coffee products on Chinese e-commerce platforms like Alibaba's Tmall and JD.com, as well as to offices and hotels in tier-1 cities, both companies said.

  • ChromaDex Corporation (CDXC) Q2 2019 Earnings Call Transcript
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  • Nestle (NSRGY) is a Great Momentum Stock: Should You Buy?
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  • Mondelez (MDLZ) Q2 Earnings Meet Estimates, 2019 View Up
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  • Stronger Growth Boosts Nestle's Prospects
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    Stronger Growth Boosts Nestle's Prospects

    The Swiss food giant continued to build momentum in the first half of 2019.

  • Reuters

    RPT-FOCUS -As rural India develops taste for chocolate, a dominant Mondelez extends its reach

    CHICAGO/HAROHALLI, India, July 29 (Reuters) - Two years ago, Satish P., a bakery owner in the small village of Harohalli near Bengaluru, had his doubts about stocking Mondelez's Cadbury Silk bars. As Satish and other Harohalli shopkeepers have found chocolate sales in India are taking off, helped by growth in disposable incomes that extends to the country's 650,000 poorer villages where more than two-thirds of the population reside. A boom in e-commerce and a sharp tax cut are also propelling sales higher, spurring global confectioners like Mondelez International Inc, Nestle SA and relative newcomer Hershey Co to invest further in the still small but rapidly expanding market.

  • As rural India develops taste for chocolate, a dominant Mondelez extends its reach
    Reuters

    As rural India develops taste for chocolate, a dominant Mondelez extends its reach

    CHICAGO/HAROHALLI, India (Reuters) - Two years ago, Satish P., a bakery owner in the small village of Harohalli near Bengaluru, had his doubts about stocking Mondelez's Cadbury Silk bars. As Satish and other Harohalli shopkeepers have found chocolate sales in India are taking off, helped by growth in disposable incomes that extends to the country's 650,000 poorer villages where more than two-thirds of the population reside. A boom in e-commerce and a sharp tax cut are also propelling sales higher, spurring global confectioners like Mondelez International Inc, Nestle SA and relative newcomer Hershey Co to invest further in the still small but rapidly expanding market.

  • Nestle posts first-half organic growth of 3.6%
    Reuters

    Nestle posts first-half organic growth of 3.6%

    Food giant Nestle said strong demand for its products in the United States and Brazil helped the KitKat chocolate bar maker post its fastest sales growth in three years during the second quarter. Organic sales, which strip out currency swings and acquisitions and disposals, accelerated to 3.9% in the three months to the end of June, the highest rate since the first quarter of 2016. "Our growth was broad-based with our largest market, the United States, performing particularly well," Chief Executive Mark Schneider said in a statement.

  • Unilever, Tesco, Nestle ranked top on meat alternatives: report
    Reuters

    Unilever, Tesco, Nestle ranked top on meat alternatives: report

        The report by the Farm Animal Investment Risk and Return (FAIRR) coalition showed 25 major retailers and manufacturers were developing strategies for sustainable protein products, recognising the risk of a strategy reliant on animal protein.     "Many have now begun a journey to diversify the protein products away from being predominantly animal-based, and towards low carbon and less resource intensive sources that are plant-based," said Jeremy Coller, founder of FAIRR, which includes institutions such as UBS and Schroders. Unilever, Tesco and Nestle were awarded top rankings for their work in understanding the impact and reducing risks associated with intensive animal agriculture, such as the emission of greenhouse gas.

  • Reuters

    Unilever, Tesco, Nestle ranked top on meat alternatives - report

    Unilever, Tesco and Nestlé are among the best prepared to capitalise on the trend for plant-based meat substitutes, according to a report from an investor group managing $5 trillion in assets. The report by the Farm Animal Investment Risk and Return (FAIRR) coalition showed 25 major retailers and manufacturers were developing strategies for sustainable protein products, recognising the risk of a strategy reliant on animal protein. Unilever, Tesco and Nestle were awarded top rankings for their work in understanding the impact and reducing risks associated with intensive animal agriculture, such as the emission of greenhouse gas.

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  • Sawdust Might Be One Answer to the World’s Plastic Problem
    Bloomberg

    Sawdust Might Be One Answer to the World’s Plastic Problem

    (Bloomberg) -- A technology startup near Ontario’s leafy border with Michigan says it has the answer to the world’s plastic pollution problem: sawdust.Origin Materials is getting ready to pay sawmills in the area $20 a ton for the scraps left over in the process of turning logs into lumber, which it will use to make recyclable plastic bottles that remove carbon-dioxide from the sky because they’re made from sustainably sourced wood waste. Nestle SA, Danone SA and PepsiCo Inc. plan to sell water in Origin’s recyclable plant-based bottles in early 2022.It’s one of the many unconventional ways conceived by scientists to reduce the world’s reliance on plastics made from petroleum, which emit as much climate-damaging pollutants as 189 coal plants each year from production to incineration. Other so-called bio-based plastics are being developed from sugar, corn, algae, seaweed, sewage and even dead beetles.“Consumers are caring about plastic in a way that they haven’t in a long time, maybe ever,” said John Bissell, 34, who founded Origin Materials in 2008 and has spent 10 years working as an engineer developing alternative plastics that don’t contribute to climate change. “Everyday things like bottles and clothing can now become carbon negative, but remain otherwise functionally identical.”That may be true in theory, but phasing out petroleum-based plastics will be an uphill battle. Use of the material has become so ingrained for societies around the world that about half of all new oil demand through 2040 will come from petrochemicals, an industry that relies on plastics for most of its business, according to BloombergNEF. The $500 billion global plastics market is responsible for 5% of greenhouse gas emissions, Friends of the Earth data show. Some projections see that ratio tripling in the next 30 years.Plant-based plastics, especially varieties made from sugar cane, are starting to seep into the mainstream as companies try to respond to consumers who are increasingly angry about the ecologically devastating impact of plastics. London-based Bulldog sells its male skincare products in plastic tubes made from sugar cane. Last year, Danish toymaker Lego A/S started including botanical pieces, like leaves, bushes and trees, made entirely of plant-based plastics in its box sets.It’ll take getting big food and beverage companies on board to really alter the equation. Nestle alone produces 1.7 million tons of plastic packaging a year, according to the Ellen MacArthur Foundation, enough to make over 51 billion bottles. Beverage makers like Coca-Cola Co. and Pepsi use a lot more than that. Coca-Cola rolled out its so-called plantbottle in 2009, but it’s still 70% petroleum based.“There is no doubt that awareness around plastic waste has become more prominent in the last two years,” said Simon Lowden, president of PepsiCo’s global snacks group, which announced in 2016 it would seek to reduce absolute greenhouse gas emissions by 20% by 2030. As part of a strategy to find more sustainable packaging, Pepsi last year joined Nestle and Danone’s NaturALL Bottle Alliance to find ways to reduce the carbon footprint of beverage bottles. All three plan to buy 100% plant-derived bottles from Origin Materials when its Ontario plant gets up and running at the end of 2020 with a starting capacity of 300 million bottles a year.Origin Materials developed a way to extract cellulose from wood waste to make para-xylene, a hydrocarbon usually derived from oil used to manufacture PET, one of the most common plastics today. Since trees and plants naturally capture CO2 through photosynthesis, using sustainably sourced sawdust and wood chips more than offsets any pollutants released in the manufacturing process, according to Bissell.However ingenious the techniques to make plant-based bottles may get, though, they’re still plastic. Not all varieties are recyclable or biodegradable. And ultimately unless they are recycled — and worldwide only one out of every five bottles is — plastic bottles inevitably end up in landfills where they may spew pollutants into the air, or worse, find their way into the oceans where most could take hundreds of years to degrade, killing birds, fish and whales in the process. When incinerating, bio-based plastics may be little better than oil-based ones because the carbon stored in them is released.Since David Attenborough’s Blue Planet 2 documentary in 2017 showed albatrosses feeding their chicks plastic by accident, plastic’s environmental impact has “gone from a niche topic of conversation and engagement to something that features in all our conversations,” said Mark Lancelott, a sustainability expert at PA Consulting Group Ltd.The London-based consultancy has seen a “significant increase” in requests from food and beverage companies on how to manage plastic waste.After the European Union and New York announced bans this year on certain single-use plastics, many companies are getting nervous about how far those regulations could go, added Katherine Lampen, a London-based partner in Deloitte’s sustainability advisory team, which advises big consumer packaged good companies.“They are concerned that the future viability of their business could be reduced due to a heavy reliance on the material,” she said.Skeptics of the bioplastic push say they’re not resolving the underlying problem. It would be better to focus on improving rates of reuse of plastic or glass packaging, with waste collected by the producer, according to Juliet Phillips, an ocean campaigner at the Environmental Investigation Agency, a non-governmental organization.If production of plant-based plastics were to be scaled up, “land-use demands could bring about competition with agriculture, accelerating deforestation concerns and biodiversity loss,” she said.For Bissell at Origin Materials, the plastic industry has become too important for global commerce to work on only one front to improve sustainability, especially considering soaring demand in emerging markets where reuse programs tend to be underdeveloped.“The end of life of plastics is really important. I'm not too sure that I'd argue that it's more important than climate change. That feels like maybe not the right trade off to make,” he said. \--With assistance from Hayley Warren.To contact the author of this story: Aine Quinn in London at aquinn38@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Lynn Thomasson at lthomasson@bloomberg.net, Daliah MerzabanNicholas LarkinFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Moody's

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  • Tensions Between Disney And Its Heiress Continue To Heat Up
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    Abigail Disney, the heir to the Disney fortune, has been speaking out lately against income inequality, and today the Walt Disney Co. clapped back. Paid To Smile Abigail Disney recently visited the Disneyland theme park in Anaheim, California to observe the working conditions of employees. She said in an interview with Yahoo that what she saw made her “livid,” with workers saying they were struggling to remain happy on the job and often had to dig through “other people’s garbage” for food. Return Fire Disney didn’t brush her claims off, calling them “a gross and unfair exaggeration” in a public statement. The company also pointed out that it pays employees an average of $19.50 an hour, more than double the federal minimum wage, and that it also committed $150 million to its Disney Aspire program that pays for workers to earn a college, high school or vocational degree. What About Bob? This is far from the first time that the heiress has spoken out about the Disney corporation. Earlier this year, she criticized a compensation package for CEO Bob Iger that will be worth as much as $35 million saying "if your CEO salary is at 700, 600, 500 times your median workers' pay, there is nobody on Earth—Jesus Christ himself isn't worth 500 times his median workers' pay." She has spoken to Congress about the need for a wealth tax to alleviate economic inequality. She a high-profile member of Patriotic Millionaires, which supports an increase in the federal minimum wage to $15 by 2024, a more robust estate tax, higher corporate taxes, plus an equalizing of tax rates on capital gains and income, and is one of a number of wealthy heirs and heiresses who have spoken out against excessive wealth. -Michael Tedder Photo: Mike Blake / REUTERS

  • People are willing to pay nearly twice as much for plant-based milk
    MarketWatch

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  • Chocolate Companies Like Hershey, Mars and Nestlé Have a Child Labor Problem
    SAY

    Chocolate Companies Like Hershey, Mars and Nestlé Have a Child Labor Problem

    Two U.S. Senators have asked the Department of Homeland Security to block the importation of cocoa products harvested with child labor. Labor Laws The request from Senators Sherrod Brown and Ron Wyden come amid recent investigations into how widespread the use of child labor remains in Ivory Coast, the world’s leading producer of cocoa products, despite the pledges of the world’s leading chocolate companies, including Nestle, Mars and Hershey, to eradicate the practice. Pledges The link between American chocolate and child slave labor in West Africa has come under scrutiny over the past twenty years. When a measure to create a federal labeling system to indicate whether child slaves had been used in harvesting cocoa didn’t pass, the chocolate industry, adamant that it didn’t need federal regulation to fix the problem, compromised with the federal government. Missed Goals Top officials of Hershey, Mars, Nestlé USA and five other chocolate companies signed onto the Harkin-Engel Protocol and created the International Cocoa Initiative. This kept federal regulators at bay as long as the companies eradicated child labor from their supply chains and created standards of public certification. The companies missed their initial deadline of July 2005, as well as several subsequent ones. Fairtrade? One of the main problems for chocolate manufacturers is that while non-profits such as Fairtrade, amongst others, provide labels to products that have been produced according to their ethical standards, farm inspections are often sporadic and easily gamed. It doesn’t help that even today “chocolate companies still cannot identify the farms where all their cocoa comes from, let alone whether child labor was used in producing it.” This is a very sad, complicated problem, one compounded by widespread poverty. Though there are few clear-cut solutions, activists believe that companies paying more for their cocoa would be a good start, while the importance of fixing this problem hasn’t been lost on shareholders. -Michael Tedder Photo: Susana Gonzalez / REUTERS

  • The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: General Mills, McCormick, Nestle, L'Oreal and J.M. Smucker
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