NTES - NetEase, Inc.

NasdaqGS - NasdaqGS Real Time Price. Currency in USD
256.24
-3.63 (-1.40%)
At close: 4:00PM EDT
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Previous Close259.87
Open261.17
Bid250.01 x 800
Ask258.00 x 800
Day's Range256.08 - 262.20
52 Week Range184.60 - 289.69
Volume406,321
Avg. Volume681,956
Market Cap32.789B
Beta (3Y Monthly)0.61
PE Ratio (TTM)38.42
EPS (TTM)N/A
Earnings DateN/A
Forward Dividend & Yield2.76 (1.06%)
Ex-Dividend Date2019-05-30
1y Target EstN/A
Trade prices are not sourced from all markets
  • How To Trade Stocks: What Is A Base? And How To Use Stock Charts To Win Big
    Investor's Business Dailyyesterday

    How To Trade Stocks: What Is A Base? And How To Use Stock Charts To Win Big

    A base is an important concept in chart reading for growth investors. NetEase formed a pair of good ones in both 2015 and 2016

  • Tencent Wants a Bigger Cut of Game Sales
    Bloomberg5 days ago

    Tencent Wants a Bigger Cut of Game Sales

    (Bloomberg) -- Tencent Holdings Ltd. is pressing China’s top smartphone vendors and app stores to boost the cut of revenue it gets from games sold through their platforms, people familiar with the matter said, stepping up efforts to claw back profits as its business slows.The social media giant is seeking as much as 70% of the sales generated from its games, up from just 50% now, said the people, who requested anonymity discussing private negotiations. That would bring Tencent’s portion in line with the proportion shared with game publishers on other platforms, including Apple Inc.’s iOS store and Google Play, which each keep 30% of revenue that comes from apps. Negotiations vary from platform to platform, and Tencent may not be asking as much from each app store operator, the people said.Tencent is keen to shore up its bottom line as growth in China, the world’s No. 2 economy, decelerates, sapping consumer spending on entertainment and hurting advertising. The company’s gaming division -- its largest -- was battered in 2018 by a series of regulatory crackdowns and in May, Tencent reported the smallest increase in sales since going public in 2004.At the same time, Tencent has gained leverage in negotiations because the pipeline of new games has shrunk, the result of Beijing’s clampdown on what it views as gaming addiction among youths. Fewer than 5,000 new games will be approved this year, versus more than 8,500 in 2017, Asia-focused gaming researcher Niko Partners estimates.Tencent “is likely to gain stronger bargaining power against its distribution channels,” Citigroup analysts led by Alicia Yap wrote in a research note this week.The social media titan initiated talks in recent weeks with most of the country’s largest app stores, run by leading smartphone makers such as Oppo, Lenovo Group Ltd. and Xiaomi Corp., as well as internet outfits such as Baidu Inc. and 360, the people said. Tencent is focusing on only a subset of its games at present, they added. But if the 70-30 split becomes the standard, that could translate into billions of dollars of additional revenue annually.Tencent dominates the market thanks to its all-purpose WeChat app, which serves more than a billion people, and a development machine that consistently cranks out hits such as Honour of Kings and Peacekeeper Elite. Now, the company is taking advantage of its heft -- its closest rival is the much smaller NetEase Inc. -- to pressure app distributors to cough up more revenue, the people said.P.H. Cheung, a spokesman for Tencent, didn’t immediately respond to an email and text query on the company’s plans, which were previously reported by gaming industry media outlet Gamelook. Baidu and Oppo declined to comment.Those negotiations are by no means all one-sided. If anything, Tencent may have to work hard to change the status quo. The country’s four biggest smartphone names -- Oppo, Vivo, Huawei Technologies Co. and Xiaomi -- run app stores for their users that together account for about 40% of market share.Among the new titles Tencent wants a bigger revenue cut on is role-playing mainstay JX Online 3, developed by China’s Kingsoft Corp., and Crazyracing Kartrider, a mobile remake of a popular title from South Korea’s Nexon Co., one person said. As of now, neither title is available on stores operated by Oppo and Vivo, suggesting those two device-makers have yet to agree to Tencent’s proposal.App developers and publishers compete to get games listed on those stores, whose operators host in-game payments for things such as virtual goods, character skins and power-ups. In return, developers get a cut of that revenue. Unlike in the U.S. and Europe, where a 70-30 split is common, revenue-sharing varies hugely across different Chinese stores but is commonly pegged at 50%. Furthermore, that cut is usually negotiated directly with each of the stores, sometimes on a game-by-game basis.What’s in the app stores’ favor is the sheer volume of competition. While Google Play is blocked in China, there are approximately 400 Android app stores, though many have an extremely small number of mobile users. The country’s app stores focus especially heavily on games because that’s where the money is -- many don’t even levy a cut of revenue at all on non-gaming apps.\--With assistance from Lulu Yilun Chen.To contact Bloomberg News staff for this story: Zheping Huang in Hong Kong at zhuang245@bloomberg.net;Gao Yuan in Beijing at ygao199@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Tom Giles at tgiles5@bloomberg.net, Edwin Chan, Colum MurphyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

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  • Will NetEase Stock Continue to Move Higher in 2H19?
    Market Realist14 days ago

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  • China silences podcast and music apps as online crackdown widens
    TechCrunch15 days ago

    China silences podcast and music apps as online crackdown widens

    Audio apps are flying high in China. On Friday, a total of 26 audio-focused apps were ordered to terminate, suspend services, or have talks with regulators as they were investigated and deemed to have spread "historical nihilism" and "pornography," according to a notice posted by the Cyberspace Administration of China (CAC). Last month, Apple restricted Chinese users from accessing podcasts that aren't hosted by its local partners, effectively preventing those with a Chinese Apple account from consuming content unchecked by Chinese censors.

  • Bloomberg19 days ago

    Tencent Leads China's Effort to Slap Age Ratings on Games

    (Bloomberg) -- China’s biggest game developers including Tencent Holdings Ltd. have stepped up efforts to build a system to rate games for different ages, as the government tightens its control over a $38 billion industry it accuses of fomenting teenage addiction.More than 10 of the country’s top gaming firms -- including Tencent, NetEase Inc. and Perfect World -- have teamed up to devise a system to assign games to one of four age categories, according to a proposal carried on the People’s Daily’s website. The effort is led by the online edition of the state-backed newspaper, often regarded as the mouthpiece of the Communist Party.The rare instance of collaboration among often fierce rivals underscores the industry’s eagerness to pander to Beijing after a devastating 2018 crackdown. The proposed system will assign categories for players -- from the ages of 6, 12, 16 and 18 upward -- to titles based on content, genres and in-app purchases, among other things. Children under six are not recommended to play games on their own, according to draft rules.It’s unclear how developers and publishers intend to enforce the ratings. The system is expected to be rolled out nationwide after an expert committee of researchers, press members and gaming executives have had time to assess and provide feedback, according to the People’s Daily’s online edition.China doesn’t have a self-regulating organization that assigns ratings to games like the U.S. Entertainment Software Rating Board. The ESRB, for instance, slaps ratings such as “A” -- adults, or 18 and above -- “Teen” or “Everyone” on games based primarily on age.Publishers are required to obtain government licenses for games sold domestically. But the process was suspended for nine months last year as Beijing attempted to reduce screen time for teenagers. That freeze, which wiped hundreds of billions of dollars off Tencent’s market value, spurred industry players to appease regulators by imposing stricter time limits on minors, while cleaning up content.To contact the reporter on this story: Zheping Huang in Hong Kong at zhuang245@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Edwin Chan at echan273@bloomberg.net, Colum MurphyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • When Should You Buy NetEase, Inc. (NASDAQ:NTES)?
    Simply Wall St.20 days ago

    When Should You Buy NetEase, Inc. (NASDAQ:NTES)?

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  • This Cult Videogame Is Facing Down Copycats in China
    Bloomberg29 days ago

    This Cult Videogame Is Facing Down Copycats in China

    (Bloomberg) -- In The Legend of Mir, warriors and sorcerers battle creatures from an ancient universe. Now, WeMade Co.’s long-time videogame hit is at the center of a string of legal battles that could serve as a rallying cry for foreign companies harboring grievances against Chinese rivals.Over the last three years, the South Korean studio’s chief executive officer, Henry Chang, has filed about 65 lawsuits in China, Singapore and South Korea against Chinese gaming studios, attempting to block what he alleges are unlicensed versions of his two-decade-old title.That makes the 44-year-old one of the few foreign executives audacious enough to challenge a batch of Chinese firms in the world’s largest videogame market.He’s already racked up a few victories: In December, a Beijing court ordered Guangzhou-based 37 Interactive Entertainment Technology Co. to stop selling a game allegedly based on Mir. In May, a Singapore-based arbitration court required a unit of China’s Kingnet Network Co. to pay WeMade 468 million yuan ($68 million) in royalties.Chang’s crusade provides a window into new challenges facing a $38 billion videogame industry dominated by local behemoths Tencent Holdings Ltd. and NetEase Inc. Chinese courts are taking a tougher stance on copyright laws. And while multinationals have long avoided filing suits against rivals in China, Chang feels it’s now worth the effort partly because U.S. President Donald Trump’s trade war has raised awareness about intellectual property.“Some people say Trump is bringing the world to its end, but I think he’s playing a positive role when it comes to China, ” said Chang, a grey-haired executive who prefers jeans to suits “He’s speeding up China’s change through pressure.”Chang could also use the money: WeMade now relies on royalties from licensed games like Mir for half its revenue.On its WeChat account on May 10, before the arbitration court’s ruling, Kingnet said that although it was open to negotiations, the damages WeMade was seeking were too high. It urged the South Korean firm to stop “ill-intentioned" lawsuits and "unreasonable" demands. Tencent didn’t comment, while Kingnet and 37 Interactive didn’t respond to questions.“We fully respect the intellectual property rights of others and of our own, and we are a constant advocate for the protection of copyright,” NetEase said in an emailed statement. “NetEase has always had a ‘zero tolerance’ policy toward copycatting/plagiarism.”Even before the trade war, Chinese courts had begun enhancing protections for intellectual property, as more domestic corporations climbed the value chain and produced cutting-edge innovations. But Chang feels that’s accelerated as Trump called attention to the issue.He hopes winning more suits will boost profitability. Still, the effects of court battles like his could be felt beyond videogames.“It would embolden more foreign companies, especially ones in the U.S. and Japan, to go ahead with suing Chinese firms on Chinese soil,” said Wi Jong-hyun, a professor of business management at Seoul’s Chung-Ang University. “These lawsuits would add headaches for Chinese companies who would no longer enjoy the kind of protection they would in the past.”Foreign firms are restricted from selling games without a local partner in China, which research firm Newzoo estimates is home to more than 600 million gamers. But growth slowed for the industry after Beijing froze licenses for new games for nine months last year and attempted to reduce screen time for teenagers.Other international companies, including U.S.-based Activision Blizzard Inc. and Seoul-based PUBG Corp., have previously sued Chinese firms for allegedly ripping off content. And the gaming industry in other parts of the world, including South Korea, has in the past been blamed for allowing other varieties of copycats.But Byun Ung-jae, a lawyer with Seoul-based Yulchon LLC, said China’s courts have become quicker to prohibit possible knockoffs from selling.“WeMade stands out because they’ve been brave and dogged enough to take the fight to the court for quite some time,” said Byun, who doesn’t have business ties with the company. “China’s gaming industry has also grown huge now, so the country also feels it’s time to provide protection for its own sake.”WeMade struck gold about 20 years ago when it released Mir through Shanda Games in China, getting as many as 200 million people to sign up at one point.But in the summer of 2015, as Chang traveled to China, he was shocked to learn that games almost identical to Mir were in service there.Yet his company had spotted red flags years before. In 2003, WeMade sued Shanda for allegedly copying Mir in its own game without licensing. The dispute was settled several years later, after Shanda bought a majority stake in a Korean company that is a Mir co-licensor.Shanda, which still runs the original Mir game in China and didn’t respond to a request for comment, is in a separate lawsuit with WeMade about renewing their licensing agreement.Winning isn’t easy. In April, a Hangzhou court issued an injunction, temporarily stopping another Kingnet unit from publishing one version of a game WeMade said was based on Mir. Kingnet produced a new version, sparking another round of legal battles over what WeMade says is really the same game.It’s easy to see why Chang likes Trump’s toughness on China, but he also worries about a trade war escalation.“It has been positive so far, with China showing off its judicial system," Chang said. "But if this really turns into a war, it may no longer feel like doing so.”To contact the reporters on this story: Sam Kim in Seoul at skim609@bloomberg.net;Zheping Huang in Hong Kong at zhuang245@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Edwin Chan at echan273@bloomberg.net, Anjali CordeiroFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Here’s What Hedge Funds Think About NetEase, Inc  (NTES)
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  • Chinese Tech Companies Begin to Recover Following Trade War Hits
    Zackslast month

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  • Reuters2 months ago

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    It's the most sensitive day of the year for China's internet, the anniversary of the bloody June 4 crackdown on pro-democracy protests at Tiananmen Square, and with under two weeks to go, China's robot censors are working overtime. Censors at Chinese internet companies say tools to detect and block content related to the 1989 crackdown have reached unprecedented levels of accuracy, aided by machine learning and voice and image recognition. "We sometimes say that the artificial intelligence is a scalpel, and a human is a machete," said one content screening employee at Beijing Bytedance Co Ltd, who asked not to be identified because they are not authorised to speak to media.

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  • Reuters2 months ago

    China's NetEase to launch first official Pokemon game in China

    Chinese gaming giant NetEase said on Monday that it would partner with The Pokemon Company and Marvel to release new games for the domestic market, as it looks to add more foreign content to its roster and shore up revenue. A local version of Pokemon Quest will mark the first official Pokemon mobile game release for China, set to arrive nearly three years after Pokemon Go first hit the global market. "The Pokemon Quest partnership is a new start and highly anticipated," NetEase VP Ethan Wang said at an industry event.

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  • Reuters2 months ago

    Opting out - Some of China’s '996' tech tribe quit, seek less stress

    For over six years Qi Yaqian was a proud member of China's so-called 996 tech tribe, working nights and weekends at Nuomi, a group deals website. Qi is not the only Chinese millennial to question the value of working long hours in the tech sector. In April, protests from tech employees against excessive overtime surfaced online, sparking an equal pushback from industry magnates such as billionaire Jack Ma of e-commerce giant Alibaba Group Holding Ltd.

  • NetEase Wins the Profit Growth Game
    Motley Fool2 months ago

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