ORCL Nov 2019 50.000 call

OPR - OPR Delayed Price. Currency in USD
6.37
+0.44 (+7.42%)
As of 3:58PM EST. Market open.
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous Close5.93
Open5.93
Bid6.35
Ask6.75
Strike50.00
Expire Date2019-11-15
Day's Range6.25 - 6.37
Contract RangeN/A
Volume5
Open InterestN/A
  • 'Costly and time-consuming:' Why Oracle's board refuses to release gender pay gap data
    American City Business Journals

    'Costly and time-consuming:' Why Oracle's board refuses to release gender pay gap data

    As far as large tech companies go, Oracle stands out in its resistance to releasing pay data, according to Heather Smith, a vice president at the $4.5 billion Pax World Funds, which brought the proposal to Oracle.

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    GuruFocus.com

    Jeremy Grantham's 3rd-Quarter Buys

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  • Is Oracle Stock A Buy Right Now? Here's What Earnings, Charts Show
    Investor's Business Daily

    Is Oracle Stock A Buy Right Now? Here's What Earnings, Charts Show

    A multiyear business restructuring by Oracle has moved the database software giant solidly into cloud computing, as bulls and bears continue to debate what it means for the company's stock.

  • Do You Like Oracle Corporation (NYSE:ORCL) At This P/E Ratio?
    Simply Wall St.

    Do You Like Oracle Corporation (NYSE:ORCL) At This P/E Ratio?

    This article is written for those who want to get better at using price to earnings ratios (P/E ratios). To keep it...

  • Oracle Expands Innovation Lab to Advance Industries
    PR Newswire

    Oracle Expands Innovation Lab to Advance Industries

    Oracle and partners apply latest technology to help construction, communications, and utility companies spark growth through modernization REDWOOD SHORES, Calif., Nov. 19, 2019 /PRNewswire/ --   Oracle ...

  • Oracle Delays Decision to Replace Mark Hurd
    Bloomberg

    Oracle Delays Decision to Replace Mark Hurd

    (Bloomberg) -- A month after the death of Chief Executive Officer Mark Hurd, Oracle Corp.’s succession plan is to leave control in the hands of Chairman Larry Ellison and Hurd’s fellow CEO Safra Catz while an internal successor is groomed, people familiar with the matter said. While Ellison has put forth five candidates, none has emerged quickly as the front-runner to join Catz as CEO, and the company is likely to appoint someone president first—or at least give that executive more time to grow into the role, said the people, who asked not to be identified discussing the company’s private deliberations. Oracle has considered promoting an executive with product or technical experience, one of the people said.Hurd, Oracle’s chief salesman, died in October after taking a short medical leave. Ellison, 75, and Catz, 57, have said they are splitting Hurd’s duties. In September, Ellison promised to give five names to Oracle’s board of executives who could one day be a “next-gen” CEO. He name-checked Steve Miranda, 50, executive vice president of applications development, and Don Johnson, EVP of Oracle Cloud Infrastructure, as leaders who would grow over time. Ellison, who also serves as technology chief, said at that time that the software maker would be in no rush to directly replace Hurd, and Oracle remains committed to taking a slow approach, said the people. The software maker has had only three chief executive officers in its 42-year history. Ellison presided over the company for decades before stepping down in 2014, when he was succeeded by Catz and Hurd. The latter two served as presidents before sharing the top job. Currently, Oracle doesn’t have any presidents. Ellison’s desire to promote from within makes it likely the next person appointed to be CEO will first serve as a president.“We should have people in the company that are capable of being promoted into that position,” Ellison said at a meeting with financial analysts in September. “So when there is this succession, it's not rushing out and doing a search. It's knowing we have these assets that are familiar with the company, familiar with the personnel.”While there’s no current rush in naming a CEO, Oracle could accelerate the appointment should the right candidate emerge, the people said. Ellison may be asked about a successor to Hurd at Tuesday's annual shareholder meeting at Oracle’s headquarters in Redwood City, California.Amid Catz’s aversion to public speaking and media interviews, and Ellison’s limited public appearances, Hurd played a special role in Oracle’s C-suite. The usually outgoing executive oversaw sales and regularly met with big corporate customers who spent tens of millions of dollars on Oracle’s collection of software programs. He frequently outlined the company’s vision in meetings with the press and on television.“Mark Hurd loved sales and he loved the deal,” Pat Walravens, an analyst at JMP Securities, said in an interview. “Because of that, he ended up touching so much of Oracle. That’s what they need in a successor. Safra’s got the operations. You need somebody who loves sales and is really good at it.”The management succession issue comes at an important time for Oracle. Fiscal-year revenue has increased an average of less than 1% annually in the past five years as Oracle has transitioned to cloud-based computing. The company's sales have declined year-over-year for two of the past four quarters and analysts project growth of just 1.4% in fiscal 2020. Still, investors appear satisfied—the company's shares have gained about 25% this year, matching the rise of the S&P 500.Ellison has placed great trust in Oracle’s product executives, describing some of them as “people who are really running the company.” Besides Miranda and Johnson, Ed Screven, 55, Oracle’s chief corporate architect who ensures products are consistent with the company’s strategy; Andy Mendelsohn, the EVP in charge of database server technologies; and Juan Loaiza, EVP of mission-critical database technologies, are senior leaders who are well-regarded by Ellison, said people familiar with the matter, who asked not to be identified discussing his thinking. Many of the executives have proven their loyalty to the boss by staying at Oracle for decades, since it was a much smaller business, but they’re seen as lacking Hurd’s panache and charisma, the people added.By contrast, Loïc Le Guisquet, the chairman for Europe, Middle East, and Africa, Asia Pacific and Japan, has sales experience and oversees a sprawling portion of the company’s business. Le Guisquet is set to be promoted to a new global role, said one of the people, but his new title couldn't be confirmed. Oracle didn’t respond to a request for comment on its succession plans.Given Ellison’s second title as Oracle’s CTO, and his ownership of a third of the business, he would almost certainly retain veto power over product decisions as long as he remains at the company.Thomas Kurian was seen as an heir to Ellison as the company’s president of product development until he left in September 2018 after an acrimonious split with the billionaire chairman, Bloomberg News has reported. Kurian is now CEO of Alphabet Inc.’s Google Cloud Platform. Rather than replace Kurian directly, Ellison has largely absorbed his responsibilities and now oversees the executives who reported to Kurian.If Oracle seeks a candidate other than Le Guisquet with more of Hurd’s skills, it has other strong options, the people said. David Donatelli, 54, Oracle’s EVP of the cloud business group, leads sales and marketing strategy for the company’s cloud efforts and was one of Hurd’s deputies. Rich Geraffo, 56, the EVP of a multibillion-dollar part of Oracle’s North American sales organization, also used to answer to Hurd.“We think we're in pretty good shape,” Ellison said in September. “We've got quality and quantity in our management team. These people are all slightly younger than I am. So I think hopefully they're going to be around a long time.”\--With assistance from Ashlee Vance.To contact the author of this story: Nico Grant in San Francisco at ngrant20@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Andrew Pollack at apollack1@bloomberg.net, Jillian WardMolly SchuetzFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Oracle (ORCL) Stock Sinks As Market Gains: What You Should Know
    Zacks

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    Oracle (ORCL) closed the most recent trading day at $56.19, moving -0.41% from the previous trading session.

  • Forbes named Kylie Jenner the youngest self-made billionaire ever — and the ‘self-made’ part has people talking
    MarketWatch

    Forbes named Kylie Jenner the youngest self-made billionaire ever — and the ‘self-made’ part has people talking

    Meet the world’s youngest selfie-made billionaire. Reality star and cosmetics queen Kylie Jenner, now 22, is probably the most recognizable (and controversial) newcomer in the Forbes magazine world billionaires issue revealed in March, when she was still 21. The social-media star’s fortune officially hit $1 billion earlier this year, several months after Forbes put her on the cover of its “richest self-made women” issue.

  • New Study: Only 11% of Brands Can Effectively Use Customer Data
    PR Newswire

    New Study: Only 11% of Brands Can Effectively Use Customer Data

    REDWOOD SHORES, Calif., Nov. 18, 2019 /PRNewswire/ -- Despite all the hype around customer data platforms (CDPs), a new study conducted by Forrester Consulting and commissioned by Oracle found that brands are struggling to create a unified view of customers.

  • Financial Times

    Twitter and targeting

    To get you up to speed: Facebook, casting itself as a bastion of free speech, last month said it would let political advertising remain on the platform unchecked. from numerous Democrats, who warned that bad politicians would abuse the system while Facebook continued to cash their cheques. On Friday, the group announced some carve-outs to the policy — namely that it would continue to allow campaign groups to advertise on political issues, while businesses can do so as long as the adverts are not connected with specific legislation or elections.

  • Google Gets Supreme Court Hearing in Oracle Copyright Clash
    Bloomberg

    Google Gets Supreme Court Hearing in Oracle Copyright Clash

    (Bloomberg) -- The U.S. Supreme Court will hear an appeal from Alphabet Inc.’s Google in a multibillion-dollar clash that has divided Silicon Valley, agreeing to decide whether the company improperly used copyrighted programming code owned by Oracle Corp. in the Android operating system.The justices said they’ll review a federal appeals court’s conclusion that Google violated Oracle’s copyrights. Oracle says it’s entitled to at least $8.8 billion in damages.The case, which the court will resolve by July, promises to reshape the U.S. legal protections for software code, particularly the interfaces that let programs and devices communicate with one another. Google contends the appeals court ruling would make it harder to use interfaces to develop new applications.The ruling “has upended the computer industry’s longstanding expectation that developers are free to use software interfaces to build new computer programs,” Google argued.The appeals court decision reversed a jury finding that Google’s copying was a legitimate “fair use” of Oracle’s Java programming language.“There is nothing fair about taking a copyrighted work verbatim and using it for the same purpose and function as the original in a competing platform,” the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit said in a 3-0 ruling.At issue are pre-written directions known as application program interfaces, or APIs, which provide instructions for such functions as connecting to the internet or accessing certain types of files. By using those shortcuts, programmers don’t have to write code from scratch for every function in their software, or change it for every type of device.Oracle says the Java APIs are freely available to those who want to build applications that run on computers and mobile devices. But the company says it requires a license to use the shortcuts for a competing platform or to embed them in an electronic device.“We are confident the Supreme Court will preserve long established copyright protections for original software and reject Google’s continuing efforts to avoid responsibility for copying Oracle’s innovations,” said Deborah Hellinger, an Oracle spokeswoman. “In the end, a finding that Google infringed Oracle’s original works will promote, not stifle, future innovation.”Oracle says Google was facing an existential threat because its search engine -- the source of its advertising revenue -- wasn’t being used on smartphones. Google bought the Android mobile operating system in 2005 and copied Java code to attract developers but refused to take a license, Oracle contends.‘Incalculable’ Harm“Naturally, it inflicted incalculable market harm on Oracle,” Oracle told the Supreme Court. “This is the epitome of copyright infringement, whether the work is a news report, a manual, or computer software.”Android generated $42 billion for Google between 2007 and 2016, according to Oracle court filings. Google said it welcomed the court’s decision to review the case.“We hope that the court reaffirms the importance of software interoperability in American competitiveness,” said Google’s chief legal officer, Kent Walker. “Developers should be able to create applications across platforms and not be locked into one company’s software.”At the Supreme Court, Google argues that software interfaces are categorically ineligible for copyright protection. Google also contends that the Federal Circuit restricted the “fair use” defense to copyright infringement so much as to make it impossible for a developer to reuse an interface in a new application.“What Oracle is seeking here is nothing less than complete control over a community of developers that have invested in learning the free and open Java language,” Google argued.The Trump administration is backing Oracle at the Supreme Court and urged the justices to reject the appeal. Microsoft Corp., Mozilla Corp. and Red Hat Inc. are among the companies that urged the Supreme Court to give Google a hearing.The appeal encompasses two decisions by the Federal Circuit in the six-year-long battle. The first is a 2014 decision that the programming language can be copyrighted, and the second is a 2018 ruling that overturned the jury’s verdict of “fair use.” The Supreme Court had previously rejected Google’s petition over the 2014 decision.If Oracle wins, the case will go back to a federal jury in California, where the only issue will be how much Google should pay in damages. Should Google win on either question, that would end the case.The case is Google v. Oracle America, 18-956.(Updates with company comments beginning in ninth paragraph.)\--With assistance from Naomi Nix.To contact the reporters on this story: Greg Stohr in Washington at gstohr@bloomberg.net;Susan Decker in Washington at sdecker1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Joe Sobczyk at jsobczyk@bloomberg.net, Elizabeth Wasserman, Jon MorganFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • UPDATE 3-U.S. Supreme Court to hear Google bid to end Oracle copyright suit
    Reuters

    UPDATE 3-U.S. Supreme Court to hear Google bid to end Oracle copyright suit

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Friday agreed to hear Google's bid to escape Oracle Corp's multi-billion dollar lawsuit accusing Google of infringing software copyrights to build the Android operating system that runs most of the world's smartphones. Google has appealed a lower court ruling reviving the suit in which Oracle has sought at least $8 billion in damages. A jury cleared Google in 2016, but the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit in Washington overturned that decision in 2018, finding that Google's inclusion of Oracle's software code in Android did not constitute a fair use under U.S. copyright law.

  • What to watch for in the JEDI protest case? Bias depositions
    American City Business Journals

    What to watch for in the JEDI protest case? Bias depositions

    Amazon Web Services’ intention to protest in the Court of Federal Claims last month’s award of the potential $10 billion JEDI contract is expected to hinge on comments President Trump has made about the contract.

  • U.S. Supreme Court to hear Google bid to end Oracle copyright suit
    Reuters

    U.S. Supreme Court to hear Google bid to end Oracle copyright suit

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Friday agreed to hear Google's bid to escape Oracle Corp's multi-billion dollar lawsuit accusing Google of infringing software copyrights to build the Android operating system that runs most of the world's smartphones. Google has appealed a lower court ruling reviving the suit in which Oracle has sought at least $8 billion in damages. A jury cleared Google in 2016, but the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit in Washington overturned that decision in 2018, finding that Google's inclusion of Oracle's software code in Android did not constitute a fair use under U.S. copyright law.

  • MarketWatch

    Supreme Court says it will hear Oracle vs. Google copyright suit

    A major copyright dispute stretching to 2010 between Oracle Corp. and Alphabet Inc.'s Google division is headed to the Supreme Court, the court said on Friday. The dispute centers on 11,500 lines of code that Google is accused of copying from Oracle's Java programming language, Oracle claims in a 9-year-old lawsuit seeking $9 billion in damages. Google, which deployed the code in Android, had won in lower courts but lost an appeal before the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, which ruled last year for Oracle.

  • Why Amazon is fighting the Pentagon over a controversial $10 billion contract awarded to Microsoft
    Yahoo Finance

    Why Amazon is fighting the Pentagon over a controversial $10 billion contract awarded to Microsoft

    Amazon is protesting the Pentagon's decision to award Microsoft a $10 billion DoD contract.

  • Amazon's stock is not looking too hot ahead of Black Friday
    Yahoo Finance

    Amazon's stock is not looking too hot ahead of Black Friday

    Amazon’s stock price hints it may not be a supremely merry holiday season for the internet beast.

  • TheStreet.com

    [video]Supreme Court to Hear Oracle's Copyright Case Against Google

    Oracle first sued Google back in 2010 for allegedly stealing code that eventually ended up in Android phones.

  • Warren Buffett Finds Wrong Elephant
    Bloomberg

    Warren Buffett Finds Wrong Elephant

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Warren Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway Inc. has $128 billion of cash. There is almost no purchase too large for the company — in fact, large is exactly what investors are waiting for. And yet, the only stock Berkshire bought last quarter was a dinky retailer, RH.Berkshire disclosed in a regulatory filing Thursday that it took a $212 million stake in RH, a California-based home-furnishings chain valued at $3.3 billion. Buffett could even buy the entire company and it’d still be a puny deal for him. But it was a big deal for RH, because the shares surged 9% in after-hours trading and held near that level early Friday morning.I admit I didn’t even recognize the retailer’s name at first. RH used to be called Restoration Hardware, a place that sells $6,000 linen sofas and elongated wooden dining tables with “forthright silhouettes.” The company shrank its name and supersized its stores, an effort to target a more upscale clientele. It’s even installed some on-site restaurants, a little nourishment to help one ponder a new addition to the ski house. That’s partly what makes RH such a funny investment for Buffett. Not only is the billionaire known for his down-to-earth lifestyle — he’s lived in the same fairly modest house for more than 60 years — but he’s also usually drawn to businesses that mirror the America he sees from his unassuming Omaha office: railroads, truck stops, Dairy Queens, the Nebraska Furniture Mart. Furthermore, Berkshire tends not to waste time on minority stakes in small, specialty chains; its only other retail holdings are Amazon.com Inc. and Costco Wholesale Corp., companies valued at $870 billion and $134 billion, respectively. RH was the only new position Berkshire took in the latest quarter, aside from buying common shares of Occidental Petroleum Corp., in which it already purchased $10 billion of preferred equity (part of a financing deal to assist the oil and gas explorer in its takeover of Anadarko Petroleum Corp.). All in all, it was another dull period for Berkshire, whose last splashy stock pick was Amazon earlier in the year. With U.S. equities still on the rise, Buffett, 89, and his investing deputies are struggling to find cheap candidates. Whoever made the call on RH — Todd Combs, Ted Weschler or the Oracle himself — he may have had prescient timing. At the end of May, RH’s price-to-earnings ratio hit a low, and the shares have doubled since then, taking a big leg up in September. That said, RH’s overnight gains drove the shares above analysts’ average target level, which is $181 apiece. “The business remains tough to predict and we believe expectations may now be somewhat elevated,” Bobby Griffin, an analyst for Raymond James & Associates who has the equivalent of a “hold” rating on RH, wrote in a Sept. 11 report, citing the China tariffs and a slowdown in high-end U.S. housing. Similarly, Gordon Haskett Research Advisors wrote to clients Sept. 10 that the firm finds other retailers such as Wayfair Inc., Williams-Sonoma Inc. and At Home Group Inc. more attractive. At the end of the day, though, no matter how RH performs, it won’t have much of an impact on Berkshire’s portfolio. Another quarter has passed without a major acquisition by Berkshire, its cash pile hitting a record yet again. RH may sell a $449 wool felt elephant, but it isn’t the kind of elephant Buffett is after. The wait continues.To contact the author of this story: Tara Lachapelle at tlachapelle@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Beth Williams at bewilliams@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Tara Lachapelle is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the business of entertainment and telecommunications, as well as broader deals. She previously wrote an M&A column for Bloomberg News.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Financial Times

    US Supreme Court takes up copyright case between Google and Oracle

    The US Supreme Court has agreed to take up a Google appeal in a long-running copyright case brought by Oracle that has cast a shadow over common development practices in the software world. Had the court refused Google’s appeal, the case would have been returned to a lower court for damages to be assessed, with Oracle seeking $9bn. The case turns on whether Google illegally copied code from Java, a software development framework owned by Oracle, when it created its Android mobile operating system.

  • Wallace Weitz Adds 3 Stocks to Portfolio in 3rd Quarter
    GuruFocus.com

    Wallace Weitz Adds 3 Stocks to Portfolio in 3rd Quarter

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  • Oracle Cloud Applications Achieves Department of Defense Impact Level 4 Provisional Authorization
    PR Newswire

    Oracle Cloud Applications Achieves Department of Defense Impact Level 4 Provisional Authorization

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  • Stock buybacks of $570 billion next year may support the S&P 500 even if there’s a recession, report says
    MarketWatch

    Stock buybacks of $570 billion next year may support the S&P 500 even if there’s a recession, report says

    According to French bank Societe Generale, stock buybacks for S&P 500 companies may reach $570 billion in 2019.

  • Amazon protests Pentagon's decision to give $10B cloud contract to Microsoft
    Yahoo Finance Video

    Amazon protests Pentagon's decision to give $10B cloud contract to Microsoft

    Amazon is protesting the Pentagon's decision to award a $10 billion dollar cloud-computing contract to Microsoft. Amazon claims the deal was marred by "errors and unmistakable bias." Yahoo Finance's Adam Shapiro, Julie Hyman, Brian Cheung, Scott Gamm and Dan Howley discuss.