QAN.AX - Qantas Airways Limited

ASX - ASX Delayed Price. Currency in AUD
6.53
-0.05 (-0.76%)
At close: 4:10PM AEDT
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Previous Close6.58
Open6.51
Bid7.03 x 0
Ask6.51 x 0
Day's Range6.47 - 6.56
52 Week Range5.18 - 6.77
Volume7,000,479
Avg. Volume6,904,075
Market Cap10.255B
Beta (3Y Monthly)-0.07
PE Ratio (TTM)12.00
EPS (TTM)0.54
Earnings DateAug 23, 2019
Forward Dividend & Yield0.26 (4.09%)
Ex-Dividend Date2019-09-02
1y Target Est7.08
  • Qantas Airways CEO Sees Demand For 20 Plus Hour Flight From New York to Sydney
    Bloomberg

    Qantas Airways CEO Sees Demand For 20 Plus Hour Flight From New York to Sydney

    Oct.17 -- Alan Joyce, Qantas Airways Ltd. chief executive officer, discusses the airline's nearly 20-hour nonstop flight from New York to Sydney. He speaks with Bloomberg's Caroline Hyde and Scarlet Fu on "Bloomberg Markets: The Close."

  • Qantas Airways to rest 19-hour non-stop flights
    Yahoo Finance Video

    Qantas Airways to rest 19-hour non-stop flights

    Qantas Airways is testing a 19 hour flight from New York and London, to Sydney, to see what the effects would be on the human body. The airline said that the flights would start as early as October. Yahoo Finance’s Myles Udland, Jen Rogers, and Rick Newman discuss.

  • Qantas Airways to test 20-hour non-stop flights
    Yahoo Finance Video

    Qantas Airways to test 20-hour non-stop flights

    Qantas Airways is testing 20-hour flights from New York and London, to Sydney, Australia, hoping to see what the effects would be on the human body. The airline said that the flights could start as early as October. Yahoo Finance’s Dan Roberts, Scott Gamm and Sibile Marcellus break down the report.

  • Qantas tests world's longest commercial flight from New York to Sydney
    Reuters

    Qantas tests world's longest commercial flight from New York to Sydney

    Australia's flag carrier Qantas completed on Sunday a nonstop test flight from New York to Sydney, researching how the world's longest potential commercial airplane journey of nearly 20 hours would impact pilots, crew and passengers. Carrying 50 passengers and crew on board, Qantas Flight 7879 on a new Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner touched down in Sydney on Sunday morning after a 16,200-kilometre (10,066-mile) journey which lasted 19 hours 16 minutes. "This is a really historic moment for Qantas, a really historic moment for Australian aviation and a really historic moment for world aviation," Qantas Chief Executive Officer Alan Joyce, who took the flight, said after landing.

  • World’s Longest Flights Aren’t Meant for Cattle Class
    Bloomberg

    World’s Longest Flights Aren’t Meant for Cattle Class

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- The question about Qantas Airways Ltd.’s plans to start 20-hour direct flights from Sydney to London and New York isn’t why any passenger would want to take the route — it’s why any carrier would want to offer them.For all the hardship of spending a day cooped up with the body odors of a couple of hundred other humans, long-haul flying isn’t a particularly attractive business for airlines, either.Qantas’s international unit made just 10.7 Australian cents of revenue per seat, per kilometer flown in its last fiscal year through June, of which 10.3 Australian cents was eaten up on operating costs. If you fly the roughly 17,000 kilometers (10,500 miles) between London and Sydney and buy a decent bottle of liquor at duty free, the A$70 ($48) you’ll spend will quite possibly be more money than the operating profit Qantas made on your ticket for the entire flight. Qantas’s Jetstar budget carrier makes about twice the profit per kilometer that the international business brings in, and its mainline domestic unit is five times more profitable.So what gives? Establishing ultra-long-haul routes is no easy task. Qantas is modifying in-flight menus and lighting patterns and using its staff as guinea pigs in a test flight this weekend to examine how passengers will cope with such a long journey.Costs don’t explain it. Indeed, they’re likely to be somewhat worse on direct ultra-long-haul flights than on more conventional routes. On a fully-laden twin-aisle passenger jet, fuel will often weigh more than all the passengers and cargo. Breaking the journey and refueling en route at a hub airport is a good way of keeping costs down, because it means that you don’t have to carry fuel for the second “leg” of the flight.Revenue, however, is a different matter. Qantas’s domestic business is so profitable because it has a single struggling rival, Virgin Australia Holdings Ltd. Despite flying more passengers in the 12 months through June than it did six years earlier, Australia’s domestic aviation network operated fewer flights. That’s possible because the muted competition between Qantas and Virgin gives them the discipline to keep a lid on capacity growth, allowing more people to be squeezed onto each plane and keeping prices high.International routes aren’t normally like that. At least a dozen different airlines typically compete to ferry passengers between Australia and Europe, and those with hub airports mid-route can easily serve multiple destinations in a way that would be crippling to an end-of-line carrier like Qantas. The partnership between Qantas and Emirates, which started in 2013, was intended to get around this problem by funneling the Australian carrier’s passengers onto the huge network operated by its Gulf partner. While that’s helped return the international unit to profit, margins are vanishingly thin.Ultra-long-haul flights are best understood as a way for the likes of Qantas to reverse the disadvantage that this tyranny of distance engenders. It will never have the network and operations to compete with the geographic advantages of hub carriers in moving passengers between Australia, Europe and North America. However, if it can tempt the more profitable premium passengers away from hub airports with a more direct route, it at least has some ammunition on its side next time it enters negotiations with Emirates about how to share revenues from their flights. You can see this even just looking at its aircraft seat maps. About 18% of the seats on Qantas’s Boeing Co. 787-9 that it uses to fly from Perth to London and on routes between Australia and the U.S. are in business class, with another 12% in premium economy. That’s a larger share of high-margin seats than on the planes that had previously been the workhorses of its international network.It’s probably right to be skeptical that spending 20 hours in economy class can be as glamorous as Qantas’s elaborate pre-testing makes it sound. The only way airlines can make decent money flying to the far side of the world is by letting business class subsidize the rest of the cabin. If you’re flying coach, these flights aren’t really aimed at you.To contact the author of this story: David Fickling at dfickling@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Matthew Brooker at mbrooker1@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.David Fickling is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering commodities, as well as industrial and consumer companies. He has been a reporter for Bloomberg News, Dow Jones, the Wall Street Journal, the Financial Times and the Guardian.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • The world’s shortest regularly scheduled commercial flight lasts 1.5 minutes
    MarketWatch

    The world’s shortest regularly scheduled commercial flight lasts 1.5 minutes

    It very well could take you longer to read this story than it would to ride on the world’s shortest scheduled passenger flight. Loganair, a Scottish regional airline, holds that title thanks to its itinerary between Westray and Papa Westray, two of the Orkney Islands located north of Great Britain. The title was previously held by the New York-Singapore route flown by Singapore Airlines (SINGF).

  • Financial Times

    FirstFT: Today’s top stories 

    The country’s trade war with the US, slowing income growth and cooling manufacturing investment took a toll on the world’s second-largest economy between July and September, according to the figures released by the National Bureau of Statistics on Friday.

  • Reuters

    UPDATE 3-Production date for Boeing's long-haul 777-8 up in air as Qantas weighs options

    The date of entry into service of Boeing Co's ultra-long-range 777-8 wide-body airliner will depend partly on customer demand, an executive said, with the planemaker hoping to win an order from Qantas Airways Ltd to supply the plane for Sydney-London flights. Qantas has said it could order Boeing's 777-8 or the rival Airbus SE A350-1000 for the longest commercial flights in history by the end of this year, with hopes of delivery from late 2022. The airline on Friday plans a near 20-hour test flight non-stop from New York to Sydney, another proposed route for the planes, with a limited number of passengers on board a 787 as it conducts research into well-being on such long journeys.

  • Financial Times

    What I learnt from my hellish long-haul flight

    Not that long ago, I did something that friends in Australia had been telling me to do for ages: take the 17-hour nonstop flight from Heathrow to Perth. “It’s amazing,” gushed one, who had been among the ...

  • Financial Times

    FirstFT: Today’s top stories

    The National Oil Tankers Company of Iran, which owns the Sabity or Sabiti tanker, said two separate missiles hit the vessel at 5am and 5.20am local time, damaging two main reservoirs on board and causing an oil leak into the Red Sea. State media said the tanker was 60 miles off Jeddah. Brent crude, the international oil benchmark, climbed 2.1 per cent to $60.36 a barrel as traders responded to the event.

  • Financial Times

    Qantas hopes its ultra-long-haul flights will go the distance

    Qantas Airways will begin testing the longest direct flights in the world next Friday, as the Australian airline aims to stretch the boundaries of technological innovation in a bid to woo premium passengers ...

  • We Think Qantas Airways (ASX:QAN) Is Taking Some Risk With Its Debt
    Simply Wall St.

    We Think Qantas Airways (ASX:QAN) Is Taking Some Risk With Its Debt

    Warren Buffett famously said, 'Volatility is far from synonymous with risk.' So it might be obvious that you need to...

  • Benzinga

    Qantas To Manage Jetstar Freight

    Singapore-based Jetstar Asia has entered into an agreement with Qantas Freight to manage the low-cost carrier's freight capacity beginning Nov. 20. Qantas has agreed to manage Jetstar Asia's cargo capacity across 23 stations in 13 markets. Jetstar operates 18 A320 aircraft, carrying belly-hold cargo.

  • Thomson Reuters StreetEvents

    Edited Transcript of QAN.AX earnings conference call or presentation 21-Aug-19 11:00pm GMT

    Full Year 2019 Qantas Airways Ltd Results Investor Presentation - Media Call

  • Here's What We Like About Qantas Airways Limited (ASX:QAN)'s Upcoming Dividend
    Simply Wall St.

    Here's What We Like About Qantas Airways Limited (ASX:QAN)'s Upcoming Dividend

    Qantas Airways Limited (ASX:QAN) is about to trade ex-dividend in the next 4 days. This means that investors who...

  • More Airlines Ban MacBook Pros in Checked Luggage
    Bloomberg

    More Airlines Ban MacBook Pros in Checked Luggage

    (Bloomberg) -- Want the lowdown on European markets? In your inbox before the open, every day. Sign up here.Restrictions on MacBook Pro laptops on flights spread, with Qantas Airways Ltd. barring some models from checked-in luggage on concern that batteries could catch fire.All 15-inch versions of Apple Inc.’s MacBook Pro must be carried in the cabin and switched off, Qantas said in a statement Wednesday. The rule went into effect Tuesday morning. Rival Virgin Australia Holdings Ltd. went further on Aug. 26, banning all Apple laptops from checked-in luggage.Australia’s two biggest airlines join a growing list of carriers and jurisdictions across the world cracking down on the portable computers out of concern some could self-combust.The models in question are some 15-inch MacBook Pros sold from September 2015 to February 2017. Apple issued the recall in June, saying “in a limited number of older generation 15-inch MacBook Pro units, the battery may overheat and pose a fire safety risk.”Singapore Airlines Ltd. and Thai Airways International PCL have already stopped passengers from taking any of the affected models on their aircraft.The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration earlier this month said it alerted major U.S. airlines about Apple’s recall. The FAA reminded airlines to follow 2016 safety instructions for goods with recalled batteries, which means the affected Apple laptops should not be taken on flights as cargo or carry-on baggage.The European Union Aviation Safety Agency issued its own warning about these MacBook Pro models on Aug. 1.While there have been repeated incidents of phones, laptops and other devices overheating and catching fire in planes’ passenger compartments, a fire hasn’t ever gone out of control. There have been at least three accidents, two of them fatal, on cargo airlines since 2006 in which lithium batteries were suspected of causing fires.To contact the reporter on this story: Angus Whitley in Sydney at awhitley1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Young-Sam Cho at ycho2@bloomberg.net, Reed Stevenson, Angus WhitleyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Thomson Reuters StreetEvents

    Edited Transcript of QAN.AX earnings conference call or presentation 22-Aug-19 1:30am GMT

    Full Year 2019 Qantas Airways Ltd Earnings Call

  • Focus: Turnaround may prove tricky for new Virgin Australia CEO Scurrah
    Reuters

    Focus: Turnaround may prove tricky for new Virgin Australia CEO Scurrah

    Shareholders will press Virgin Australia Holdings' new CEO Paul Scurrah to present a robust strategic plan on Wednesday, when the airline is expected to report its seventh consecutive annual loss, on top of $1.2 billion worth of red ink over the previous six years. With shares trading near all-time lows, Scurrah's options include cutting costs, restructuring management, rebranding its underperforming budget carrier Tigerair Australia, ending loss-making flights to Hong Kong and tightening control over the loyalty division, seven current and former managers told Reuters on condition of anonymity. Borghetti transformed the former budget airline into a more serious rival to his former employer, Qantas Airways Ltd, for lucrative corporate traffic, but in doing so he sometimes made hasty decisions that proved costly for Virgin in the long term, five of the people said.

  • Turnaround may prove tricky for new Virgin Australia CEO Scurrah
    Reuters

    Turnaround may prove tricky for new Virgin Australia CEO Scurrah

    Shareholders will press Virgin Australia Holdings' new CEO Paul Scurrah to present a robust strategic plan on Wednesday, when the airline is expected to report its seventh consecutive annual loss, on top of $1.2 billion worth of red ink over the previous six years. With shares trading near all-time lows, Scurrah's options include cutting costs, restructuring management, rebranding its underperforming budget carrier Tigerair Australia, ending loss-making flights to Hong Kong and tightening control over the loyalty division, seven current and former managers told Reuters on condition of anonymity. Borghetti transformed the former budget airline into a more serious rival to his former employer, Qantas Airways Ltd , for lucrative corporate traffic, but in doing so he sometimes made hasty decisions that proved costly for Virgin in the long term, five of the people said.

  • Should You Be Pleased About The CEO Pay At Qantas Airways Limited's (ASX:QAN)
    Simply Wall St.

    Should You Be Pleased About The CEO Pay At Qantas Airways Limited's (ASX:QAN)

    In 2008 Alan Joyce was appointed CEO of Qantas Airways Limited (ASX:QAN). This report will, first, examine the CEO...

  • Benzinga

    Qantas' Nonstop New York And London To Sydney May Provide Cargo Opportunity

    Qantas (OTCMKTS: QUBSF) announced that it is testing long-haul, nonstop passenger flights from New York and London to Sydney. In addition to its fiscal year 2019 earnings report, the company announced that it has embarked on a program dubbed "Project Sunrise" designed to study the health and well-being impacts on passengers and crew during long-distance flights. The airline has a goal of operating regular, nonstop commercial flights from the east coast of Australia (Brisbane, Sydney and Melbourne) to New York and London, which would require a commercial plane to travel approximately 19 hours nonstop.

  • Companies to Watch: Hormel has strong quarter, Simply Good Foods makes an acquisition, concerns over PG&E
    Yahoo Finance

    Companies to Watch: Hormel has strong quarter, Simply Good Foods makes an acquisition, concerns over PG&E

    Hormel, Simply Good Foods, PG&E, JPMorgan Chase and Qantas are the companies to watch.