QCOM - QUALCOMM Incorporated

NasdaqGS - NasdaqGS Real Time Price. Currency in USD
71.86
+2.75 (+3.98%)
As of 11:17AM EDT. Market open.
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous Close69.11
Open69.69
Bid71.77 x 800
Ask71.79 x 1100
Day's Range69.69 - 72.08
52 Week Range49.10 - 90.34
Volume4,950,479
Avg. Volume21,150,831
Market Cap87.36B
Beta (3Y Monthly)1.59
PE Ratio (TTM)37.94
EPS (TTM)N/A
Earnings DateN/A
Forward Dividend & Yield2.48 (3.71%)
Ex-Dividend Date2019-06-05
1y Target EstN/A
Trade prices are not sourced from all markets
  • Apple (AAPL) Likely to Launch 5G-Supported iPhones in 2020
    Zacks1 hour ago

    Apple (AAPL) Likely to Launch 5G-Supported iPhones in 2020

    Apple (AAPL) is expected to launch 5G-supported iPhones in 2020, much later than other prominent smartphone manufacturers like Samsung, LG, Huawei and Motorola.

  • Is Cypress Semiconductor a Buy?
    Motley Fool2 hours ago

    Is Cypress Semiconductor a Buy?

    Investing in this semiconductor maker makes a surprising amount of sense, even though there's a firm all-cash buyout going on.

  • Goldman Sachs Thinks Tech Stocks Are Overvalued
    Market Realist3 hours ago

    Goldman Sachs Thinks Tech Stocks Are Overvalued

    Goldman Sachs’ chief US equity strategist, David Kostin, thinks that “rising market concentration” and geopolitical tensions pose a “regulatory risk” to companies, which could harm their fundamentals.

  • Trade War or the Fed: What Tech Investors Must Watch This Week
    Market Realist4 hours ago

    Trade War or the Fed: What Tech Investors Must Watch This Week

    Unless there's a negative update about another escalation in the US-China trade war, the expected rate cut decision could trigger market-wide buying, including in tech stocks, in the near term.

  • Apple Holds Out Hope That China Will Spare It
    Market Realist4 hours ago

    Apple Holds Out Hope That China Will Spare It

    Apple (AAPL) is holding out hope that China will target it as its trade war with the US escalates. The US last month blacklisted Huawei, leading US suppliers to give the Chinese technology star a wide berth. Google has reduced its business dealings with Huawei, while Microsoft (MSFT) has stopped selling Huawei laptops on its digital shop.

  • China Puts Intel and Qualcomm on Notice over Huawei
    Market Realist4 hours ago

    China Puts Intel and Qualcomm on Notice over Huawei

    China has warned American technology companies Intel (INTC), Qualcomm (QCOM), and others of dire consequences if they respond aggressively to the trade restrictions that American authorities have slapped on Huawei. Last month, the Trump administration blacklisted Huawei as a national security risk, thereby prohibiting suppliers with operations in America from doing business with Huawei.

  • Apple to Release Two 5G iPhones Next Year: Report
    Investopedia7 hours ago

    Apple to Release Two 5G iPhones Next Year: Report

    The company will be building chips for its 5G phones by 2022 or 2023, according to analyst Ming-Chi Kuo.

  • Bloomberg7 hours ago

    Ford Takes Regulator for a Spin in Pitch to Save Connected Cars

    (Bloomberg) -- Automakers won control over a choice swath of wireless spectrum 20 years ago on the promise of delivering safety innovations to vehicles.Now, after failing to deliver widespread breakthroughs, they’re at risk of losing those frequencies to Comcast Corp. and other cable companies that say they can use them to offer robust Wi-Fi links to subscribers.The years-long struggle between the industries is nearing an inflection point, with Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai signaling he may consider new uses for the airwaves. Pai could announce as early as Tuesday that he’ll schedule a vote to re-examine the allocation at the commission’s meeting next month.“The spectrum, for 22 years, has not reached its highest valued use, and that’s part of the reason why I think it’s important to have an open conversation,” Pai said at a Senate hearing last week. “I’m not saying what the answer should be, I’m simply saying let’s ask the questions that would enable us to have an informed conversation.”That conversation has already kicked off a flurry of activity by stakeholders. A team at Ford Motor Co. gave Pai a ride in a specially outfitted F-150 pickup truck earlier this month. The idea was to demonstrate the technology that could, for example, warn of a scooter’s approach or judge when it’s safe to enter an intersection.“Grateful to Ford for showing us a glimpse of the future,” Pai said in a tweet after his parking-lot spin. “It’s important to have an open conversation about the future of this band” of airwaves.Ford and other carmakers including BMW AG and Toyota Motor Corp., don’t want to lose the rights they gained in 1999 from the FCC for a system designed to link cars, roadside beacons and traffic lights into a seamless wireless communication web to avoid collisions and heed speed limits.Yet after nearly two decades, deployments have been few. An Obama administration proposal to mandate the technology in new cars has been left to languish under the deregulatory agenda pursued by President Donald Trump. General Motors Co. introduced the first factory-equipped model, a Cadillac sedan, just two years ago. And in April, Toyota scrapped plans to equip its cars with the systems starting in 2021.Now even automakers are moving away the original system, and see greater promise in a newer method based on cellular radios -- the system in the F-150 that Ford showed off for the FCC’s Pai. Ford plans to begin equipping all of its U.S. vehicles with the systems starting in 2022.That is an issue for carmakers as the 1999 allocation of airwaves by the FCC locked them into the system envisioned then. They need new rules to use a cellular system, which is backed by several companies including Ford, Audi AG and gear maker Qualcomm Inc.Ford, in a statement, said it is “critical” for the FCC to allow the newer, cellular-based method to use the airwaves because it will become the dominant technology to connect vehicles, infrastructure and pedestrians.Cable providers have pounced, characterizing the currently mandated system as fostering “two decades of stagnation.”They’ve called for ending carmakers’ exclusive rights to the frequencies at 5.9 GHz and allocating all or most of the band to the Wi-Fi systems that carry web traffic for most cable customers.Some consumer groups agree. They include the Consumer Federation of America, the American Library Association, Public Knowledge and the Open Technology Institute at New America.“The best outcome for consumers is to move vehicle safety signaling to a different set of frequencies and allow next generation Wi-Fi to use 5.9 GHz,” Michael Calabrese, director of the Wireless Future Project at the Open Technology Institute, said in an email.Pai controls the FCC’s agenda, and his impatience ushers in a moment of promise -- and peril.“We could maintain the status quo” but “I am quite skeptical that this is a good idea,” Pai said in a speech last month to a gathering that celebrated the Wi-Fi signals used for connections in hotel lobbies, coffee shops and homes.Pai said it would take a formal rulemaking to allow greater Wi-Fi use of the swath, or to let automakers exploit the band for the cellular safety system.Skepticism has arisen within the Trump administration. Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao telephoned Pai to urge the FCC not to use its June meeting to commence its consideration of the airwaves, according to one official briefed on the matter who spoke on condition of anonymity because the conversation wasn’t public.While Transportation Department officials haven’t advanced the previous administration’s proposed mandate, they want autos to hold onto the airwaves.“Preserving the spectrum for transportation safety, which can save lives, is probably more important than slightly faster Wi-Fi,” Derek Kan, the Transportation Department’s undersecretary for policy, said in an interview June 3.To contact the reporters on this story: Todd Shields in Washington at tshields3@bloomberg.net;Ryan Beene in Washington at rbeene@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Jon Morgan at jmorgan97@bloomberg.net, Elizabeth Wasserman, John HarneyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Repeated Mistakes Are Bound to Haunt Intel Stock
    InvestorPlace15 hours ago

    Repeated Mistakes Are Bound to Haunt Intel Stock

    Intel (NASDAQ:INTC) stock is cheap. The Intel stock price sits at just over 10 times earnings. Combined with a 2.7% dividend yield, there's a value case for INTC stock at current levels.Source: Shutterstock But I've been skeptical about that case for some time -- and recent developments don't change my mind. Fundamentally, Intel stock looks cheap. As a business, however, there are plenty of reasons why that is, and should be, the case. Fundamental Concerns for INTC StockIntel stock was rolling not all that long ago. As of mid-April, the Intel stock price had risen nearly 30% in 2019 alone. And then first-quarter earnings sent the stock plummeting. INTC stock dropped 9%, wiping out some $23 billion in market value. * 7 Top-Rated Biotech Stocks to Invest In Today The catalyst was reduced guidance for 2019. Analysts and investors had been looking for a rebound in the second half of the year, after what looked like an early-year pause in datacenter spending. Intel's guidance undercut that case.InvestorPlace - Stock Market News, Stock Advice & Trading TipsIntel followed up a little over two weeks later with its three-year outlook -- and that, too, disappointed. Intel is looking for flat sales in PCs -- which investors might see as overly optimistic. Gross margins are going to be pressured amid Intel's 10nm ramp. Three-year revenue growth, on the whole, even with double-digit growth in datacenter, is supposed to be in the low single digits.It's worth remembering that in both cases, INTC stock fell -- and not because of investor overreactions. The guidance is coming from Intel itself and, in combination, it suggests that Intel's growth is going to be rather meager for three years. Cyclical semiconductor stocks with minimal growth aren't going to see big earnings multiples, which, alone, suggests that the Intel stock price at least is in the right ballpark. How Many Mistakes?There's a broader problem with the disappointing guidance, however. It's difficult for investors to trust Intel at this point, after a series of missteps. As Dana Blankenhorn pointed out last month, Intel is four years late in 10nm; Taiwan Semiconductor (NYSE:TSM) already is at 7nm.Last year, it was discovered its chips were susceptible to hackers. This year, chip shortages have put its datacenter lead at risk, allowing Nvidia (NASDAQ:NVDA) and Advanced Micro Devices (NASDAQ:AMD) to take share in a market that Intel once dominated.In CPUs, Intel seems at risk as well. AMD's new Ryzen line has been a hit. Intel's shortages are frustrating customers like Dell Technologies (NASDAQ:DELL). Intel's long dominance in PCs may have allowed it to rest on its laurels; it does not, at the moment, have an answer for AMD's rise.So, can investors trust that PC revenue is going to stay flat -- when AMD clearly is taking market share? Is datacenter revenue going to rise double-digits every year when Intel can't keep up with even slower demand? Guidance was disappointing -- and it looks far from certain Intel will be able to even meet its projections.The fundamentals don't look great. The qualitative aspects look even worse. Nvidia and, in particular, AMD clearly are taking share. Intel not only doesn't have an answer right now, it actually seems to be shooting itself in the foot. Given trade war concerns and overall chip weakness, there are plenty of reasons for investors to be worried. The Intel Stock Price Can Get CheaperAll told, it's not a surprise that Intel stock has fallen so far. Indeed, it wouldn't be surprising if Intel stock fell further. 2019 expectations clearly are at risk. 2020 and 2021 growth doesn't look particularly impressive. In a chip space with no shortage of cheap stocks -- think Broadcom (NASDAQ:AVGO) and Qualcomm (NASDAQ:QCOM), to name two -- INTC hardly looks like an attractive pick. * 10 High-Yield Monthly Dividend Stocks to Buy Admittedly, that could change. But it requires that Intel start fixing its mistakes -- and start improving its products. It seems we're still a ways off on both fronts. Until then, INTC is likely to trade sideways at best.As of this writing, Vince Martin has a bullish options position in Dell Technologies. He has no positions in any other securities mentioned. More From InvestorPlace * 4 Top American Penny Pot Stocks (Buy Before June 21) * The 7 Best Tech Stocks to Buy for the Second Half of 2019 * 7 Top-Rated Biotech Stocks to Invest In Today * 4 Semiconductor Stocks to Sell Compare Brokers The post Repeated Mistakes Are Bound to Haunt Intel Stock appeared first on InvestorPlace.

  • Why Qualcomm Chose Samsung Factory for 5G Chipset Production
    Market Realist18 hours ago

    Why Qualcomm Chose Samsung Factory for 5G Chipset Production

    Qualcomm (QCOM) has selected Samsung (SSNLF) to produce its next flagship chipset, the Snapdragon 865, according to Korean media reports cited by the Firstpost. The Snapdragon 865 chip is expected to come in two versions: there will be one with a 5G modem and another without.

  • TheStreet.com20 hours ago

    Apple's Reported 2020 iPhone Plans Are a Positive for Broadcom

    , which last week cut its sales guidance for its current fiscal year by $2 billion due to both a Huawei parts ban and weaker demand from other clients, will see its chip sales to Apple bounce sharply next year. Analyst Ming-Chi Kuo, who has had a fairly high accuracy rate over the years when it comes to Apple product scoops, says that Apple plans to launch 5.4-inch and 6.7-inch flagship iPhones in 2020, along with a new, relatively low-cost, 6.1-inch iPhone (by comparison, the iPhone XS and XS Max have 5.8-inch and 6.5-inch displays, respectively).

  • Qualcomm Faces Resistance in Attempt to Put Recent Ruling on Hold
    Market Realist20 hours ago

    Qualcomm Faces Resistance in Attempt to Put Recent Ruling on Hold

    A federal judge in California last month ruled that Qualcomm’s business practices stifled competition and ordered the company to change its business model. Qualcomm is expected to appeal the ruling. In the meantime, the company wants the ruling set aside until its appeal is heard.

  • A Huawei Ban May Not Be the Answer
    Zacks20 hours ago

    A Huawei Ban May Not Be the Answer

    The U.S. ban on Huawei products may not be the best way to handle the national security concern the issue has raised.

  • Report: Intel and Xilinx are lobbying regulators to continue selling to Huawei
    American City Business Journalsyesterday

    Report: Intel and Xilinx are lobbying regulators to continue selling to Huawei

    The Trump administration has ordered American companies not to do business with Huawei, claiming the Chinese company represents a threat to national security.

  • MarketWatchyesterday

    U.S. chip makers seek easing of Huawei ban: report

    Major U.S. chip makers, including Intel Corp. , Qualcomm Inc. and Xilinx Inc. , have quietly lobbied the Trump administration to ease its ban on sales to Chinese tech giant Huawei Technologies Co., Reuters reported Sunday. One source told Reuters that the aim was not to help Huawei, but to prevent harm to U.S. companies. Reuters said Huawei spent about $11 billion buying components from U.S. companies in 2018. The Trump administration announced the ban in May, after trade negotiations between the U.S. and China stalled. Earlier this month, the acting White House budget chief sought to delay implementation of the ban, the Wall Street Journal reported, arguing that the burden would fall on U.S. companies that did business with Huawei.

  • U.S. chipmakers quietly lobby to ease Huawei ban
    Reuters2 days ago

    U.S. chipmakers quietly lobby to ease Huawei ban

    SAN FRANCISCO/WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Huawei's American chip suppliers, including Qualcomm and Intel, are quietly pressing the U.S. government to ease its ban on sales to the Chinese tech giant, even as Huawei itself avoids typical government lobbying, people familiar with the situation said. Executives from top U.S. chipmakers Intel and Xilinx Inc attended a meeting in late May with the Commerce Department to discuss a response to Huawei's placement on the black list, one person said. The ban bars U.S. suppliers from selling to Huawei, the world's largest telecommunications equipment company, without special approval, because of what the government said were national security issues.

  • Broadcom's dim outlook sparks chip stock selloff, analyst expects things to get worse
    Yahoo Finance4 days ago

    Broadcom's dim outlook sparks chip stock selloff, analyst expects things to get worse

    After Broadcom cut its forecast sparking a chip stock selloff, one analyst warns that things might get worse.

  • Bloomberg4 days ago

    Huawei Has 56,492 Patents and It's Not Afraid to Use Them

    (Bloomberg) -- As Huawei Technologies Co. comes under unrelenting pressure from the Trump administration, the Chinese telecom giant has one advantage that the U.S. can’t undermine: a vast, global portfolio of patents on critical technology.Huawei holds 56,492 active patents on telecommunications, networking and other high-tech inventions worldwide, according to Anaqua’s AcclaimIP. And it’s stepping up pursuit of royalties and licensing fees as its access to American markets and suppliers is being restricted.The company is in protracted licensing talks with phone-services provider Verizon Communications Inc. and is in a dispute with chipmaker Qualcomm Inc. over the value of patents. Huawei also lodged claims against Harris Corp. after the defense contractor sued it last year alleging infringement of patents for networking and cloud security.“Patents are, at their basic level, weapons of economic warfare,” said Brad Hulbert, a patent lawyer with McDonnell Boehnen Hulbert & Berghoff in Chicago. “They’re being hurt by the sanctions that the Trump Administration imposed and saying ‘You have hurt us and our ability to sell, and we can hurt back.’ It’s saber-rattling.”Broader national security concerns also hang over this technology battle. In some circles Huawei’s outsized role as a supplier to next generation, or 5G networks makes it a potential threat either as an espionage agent or network disruption tool. Huawei has not only become a flashpoint in the middle of a 5G arms race, it’s also one of several companies targeted in President Donald Trump’s ongoing trade dispute with China.Trump signed an order in May that’s expected to restrict Huawei from selling equipment in the U.S. Shortly after, the Department of Commerce said it had put Huawei on a blacklist that could forbid it from doing business with American companies.For its part, the Asian nation sees Huawei as a potent symbol of its evolution from the world’s factory to a technology powerhouse, while the U.S. claims the tech company steals inventions from American firms.“Huawei has invested a lot of money and they want to be recognized,” said Jim McGregor, a Mesa, Arizona-based technology analyst with Tirias Research. “Huawei is just playing out standard business practices for the wireless industry.”Patent disputes are common in the tech industry, and the coming revolution predicted by advances in “5G” wireless technology promises to bring even more. Traditional players like Ericsson AB and Nokia Oyj are ramping up efforts to get more money from their patents. Qualcomm is appealing a ruling in a lawsuit by the U.S. Federal Trade Commission that threatens the licensing program that accounts for the bulk of its profits. Huawei and Samsung Electronics Co. ended a two-year royalty fight in February.Qualcomm and Huawei are seen as two of the biggest players developing 5G that could bring not only faster speeds but bring new capabilities including remote surgery via robots and self-driving cars that talk to each other. The global ban on Huawei equipment promoted by Trump has roiled telecom companies worldwide. It’s a reminder, McGregor said, that 5G relies on both the U.S. and China.“Huawei, over the past couple of years, has really ramped up its efforts in not only patents but in the standard bodies, particularly in wireless technology,” McGregor said. “They can say ‘whether you’re using our equipment or Ericsson’s equipment, you’re using our inventions. You still have to take a license.’”The Chinese government and companies have been investing billions in high-tech research, and have the patents to show for it. Last year alone, Huawei received 1,680 U.S. patents, making it the 16th biggest recipient, figures by Fairview Research’s IFI Patent Claims Services show. Huawei’s total portfolio of active patents and published applications is 102,911, according to Anaqua, an intellectual property-management software firm.Royalty demands against cell-phone carrier Verizon by Huawei, reported Wednesday by the Wall Street Journal, could be become part of the political battle, said Peter Toren, a Washington-based patent lawyer who consults with other firms and companies on licensing and litigation.“Given Huawei’s position and the pressure they are feeling, they have nothing to lose at this point than to go after American companies in the patent arena,” Toren said. “They get poked in one area and they’re going to stick back in another to show there are consequences for this continued pressure.“I don’t see how the government can stop them,” he said. “They have ownership in the patents.”Verizon, while declining to comment on specific talks, sees the negotiations as more than just a typical patent-licensing discussion.“These issues are larger than just Verizon,” the company said in a statement. “Given the broader geopolitical context, any issue involving Huawei has implications for our entire industry and also raise national and international concerns.”Officials with Huawei had no immediate comment.McGregor said it makes sense for Huawei to demand royalties from Verizon because it’s the largest cell-phone carrier in the U.S. Verizon claims it’s the first to offer speedy new 5G services for mobile phones, though it’s only available in a limited area.“If they don’t go to them within a reasonable amount of time and at least try to enforce those patents, those patents become unenforceable,” McGregor said. “You have to pick a starting point. It’s better to pick one of the major players and it makes sense to pick one of those who’s rolling out that technology.”\--With assistance from Ian King and Scott Moritz.To contact the reporter on this story: Susan Decker in Washington at sdecker1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Jon Morgan at jmorgan97@bloomberg.net, Elizabeth WassermanFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Investing.com4 days ago

    Stocks - Wall Street Ends Flat as Tech Suffers Broadcom Beatdown

    Investing.com - The S&P; 500 closed flat on Friday as firmer retail sales pointing to underlying strength in the U.S. economy were countered by a slump in chip stocks, led by Broadcom.

  • Investing.com4 days ago

    StockBeat - Broadcom's Gloomy Outlook Wrecks Chip Stocks

    Investing.com - Broadcom fell sharply Friday, sending chip stocks lower after the company delivered an ominous outlook and reported revenue that fell short of estimates.

  • Investing.com4 days ago

    Top 5 Things to Know in the Market on Friday

    Investing.com - Here are the top five things you need to know in financial markets on Friday, June 14:

  • Qualcomm (QCOM) Outpaces Stock Market Gains: What You Should Know
    Zacks5 days ago

    Qualcomm (QCOM) Outpaces Stock Market Gains: What You Should Know

    In the latest trading session, Qualcomm (QCOM) closed at $69.93, marking a +0.49% move from the previous day.

  • MARKETS: Global fund managers are the most bearish since the Great Financial Crisis
    Yahoo Finance Video38 minutes ago

    MARKETS: Global fund managers are the most bearish since the Great Financial Crisis

    From the YFi Interactive touch screen, Yahoo Finance's Jared Blikre joins Alexis Christoforous to break down the latest Bank of America Merrill Lynch Global Fund Manager Survey showing a flight into bonds and cash, and the biggest underweight in equities since March, 2009. “FMS investors have not been this bearish since the Global Financial Crisis, with pessimism driven by trade war and recession concerns,” said Michael Hartnett, chief investment strategist.