QCOM - QUALCOMM Incorporated

NasdaqGS - NasdaqGS Real Time Price. Currency in USD
76.07
+1.20 (+1.60%)
At close: 4:00PM EDT

76.06 -0.01 (-0.01%)
After hours: 7:33PM EDT

Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous Close74.87
Open74.58
Bid75.91 x 1000
Ask76.10 x 1100
Day's Range74.33 - 76.43
52 Week Range49.10 - 90.34
Volume7,184,204
Avg. Volume13,737,823
Market Cap92.475B
Beta (3Y Monthly)1.64
PE Ratio (TTM)27.84
EPS (TTM)N/A
Earnings DateN/A
Forward Dividend & Yield2.48 (3.48%)
Ex-Dividend Date2019-09-11
1y Target EstN/A
Trade prices are not sourced from all markets
  • Qualcomm CEO on communicating with the White House, Congress
    Yahoo Finance Video

    Qualcomm CEO on communicating with the White House, Congress

    Yahoo Finance's Andy Serwer sat down with Qualcomm CEO Stephen Mollenkopf on the latest episode of 'Influencers With Andy Serwer', and they discussed how the Trump administration is interested in getting input from the companies that are affected by the trade war.

  • Qualcomm CEO on weak Q2, points to 5G, Huawei ban
    Yahoo Finance Video

    Qualcomm CEO on weak Q2, points to 5G, Huawei ban

    Huawei has played a major role in the U.S.-China trade war. President Trump placed a temporary ban on the company as leverage in a deal. Yahoo Finance’s The First Trade takes a peek into Andy Serwer’s interview with Qualcomm's CEO Steve Mollenkopf on how his company was hurt by the ban when it comes to 5G.

  • Steve Mollenkopf joins Influencers with Andy Serwer
    Yahoo Finance Video

    Steve Mollenkopf joins Influencers with Andy Serwer

    Yahoo Finance Editor-in-Chief Andy Serwer sits down with Qualcomm CEO, Steve Mollenkopf.

  • Why you may want to invest in semiconductors
    Yahoo Finance Video

    Why you may want to invest in semiconductors

    Yahoo Finance’s Adam Shapiro, Julie Hyman, and Brian Cheung join Hennion and Walsh Asset Management President and Chief Investment Officer Kevin Mahn and Villere Balanced Fund Portfolio Manager Lamar Villere.

  • Chip Companies to Gain as Trump Delays Huawei Ban
    Market Realist

    Chip Companies to Gain as Trump Delays Huawei Ban

    US Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross granted a 90-day reprieve to Huawei on August 19, which came as a relief to chip companies.

  • Trump Blocks Tech Merger to Stimulate 5G Leadership
    InvestorPlace

    Trump Blocks Tech Merger to Stimulate 5G Leadership

    Chris' note: What do self-driving cars, artificial intelligence, and augmented reality have in common? There's one piece of bleeding-edge technology that unites them all…Source: Shutterstock Regular readers know I'm talking about 5G. It's one of the biggest trends on Jeff Brown's radar.Jeff is our go-to tech expert here at The Daily Cut. And this Thursday, August 22 at 8 p.m. ET, he's hosting a free 5G investment summit.InvestorPlace - Stock Market News, Stock Advice & Trading TipsAs you'll see, we're about to enter what Jeff calls the "Final Phase of the 5G Boom." If he's right, folks have a real shot at watching a series of small investments return 500%… 1,000%… and more. If you're serious about profiting from the 5G boom, you'll want to reserve your spot right here.But you don't have to wait until Thursday to learn more about 5G… and why Jeff believes it will be the most important tech trend over the next decade. Below, he shows why 5G is central to a global battle America must win. And the economic impact will be huge…The United States and China are locked in a winner-take-all economic struggle.And no, I'm not talking about the ongoing trade negotiations. It's something else.Whoever wins will be the economic powerhouse of the next decade. The stakes are that high.Let me show you what I mean…Hostile TakeoverLast year, we almost saw a merger between technology firms Broadcom (NASDAQ:AVGO) and Qualcomm (NASDAQ:QCOM). Had it gone through, it would have been the largest tech deal to date.Broadcom had been pursuing Qualcomm since November 2017. It initially offered an unsolicited bid of $103 billion to acquire controlling interest of Qualcomm.Qualcomm resisted. So Broadcom took another route.It initiated a hostile takeover of Qualcomm. That's when an acquiring company attempts to bypass its target's board and purchases a controlling interest in the company directly from shareholders. Very often, this means offering to buy shares at a premium.At $117 billion, the new bid for Qualcomm would have represented the largest technology merger in history.But then the White House stepped in… President Trump blocked the merger. The president said that "credible evidence" suggested that the takeover would pose a risk to U.S. national security.The official details are classified. But I believe I know why the White House took this unprecedented step.At the heart of the president's decision to block the merger is fifth-generation (5G) wireless technology.And here's why that's important…The Coming Wave of 5GWhen you connect to the internet on your computer, smartphone, or smart TV, a vast physical communications infrastructure makes that connection possible.And over the years, our wireless networks - and the infrastructure that supports them - have evolved.It all started in the 1980s with first-generation (1G) networks. Compared to what's possible today, 1G didn't allow much. You could only place voice calls - there was no layer for carrying other types of data. And you had to use one of those brick-sized cell phones Gordon Gekko yaps into in the movie Wall Street.But from then on, a new network generation went live roughly every 10 years. Each provided faster download speeds and more applications. The most recent one, 4G, went live around 2011.Now we're shifting to the fifth generation of wireless networks - 5G. And it represents the largest leap in wireless technology to date.A Leap ForwardThe current 4G networks are a disappointment. They're much slower than what the original developers thought the networks would deliver.Worst of all, the U.S. is in 62nd place when it comes to download speeds. That's going by a 2018 OpenSignal report.But with 5G, it's a different story. At peak speed, 5G will be almost 1,000 times faster than the average 4G connection we have today.We'll be going from an average of 16 megabits per second with current LTE connections… to 10 gigabits per second. (One gigabit is 1,000 megabits.)Even if we assume average 5G speeds will be 10% of their potential, we'd be looking at 1,000 megabits per second. That's almost 100 times faster than what we have today.With that kind of speed, you'll be able to download a two-hour movie in 10 seconds. Dropped phone calls and slow-loading web pages will be a thing of the past.Plus, some previously "sci-fi" tech will finally become a reality. Technologies like self-driving cars, virtual reality, and holographic projection will all operate over high-speed 5G connections. The applications are endless.5G is a game-changer because of all the technological innovation it will bring about. It'll be responsible for $12 trillion worth of new goods and services by 2035. That's about 70% of America's total GDP in 2018.And here's why the government considers the completion of 5G a matter of national security…Matter of National SecurityCountries that lead the way in deploying these networks will have a competitive economic advantage over other countries. And the technology companies in these "first-mover" countries will be the first to develop the hardware and software enabling these 5G wireless services.Right now, our government's fear is that China will set the 5G precedent.For context, Chinese company Huawei supplies the infrastructure and support for more than half of the 537 4G networks around the world. Suspicions have abounded for years about the company using its technology to spy on U.S. network traffic. And since 2018, tensions are reaching new highs.This led to Huawei being banned for a time from the U.S. and several other Western markets over spying concerns.The U.S. government sees it as an imperative that U.S. wireless networks are built out quickly - with U.S. and European technology - to ensure that the country's networks are less likely to fall victim to foreign espionage.That's why the Trump administration blocked the Broadcom/Qualcomm merger.While Broadcom recently stated its intention to bring most of its business back to the U.S., the bulk of its business is still based in Singapore. And while Singapore is its own country, it's heavily controlled by Chinese Singaporeans.The concern was that Broadcom would force Qualcomm to cut back on its 5G research and development, letting Huawei fill the void and making U.S. wireless networks vulnerable to cyberspying.This isn't wild speculation, either.The Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States is a government agency that oversees foreign investment in American companies. It officially recommended blocking the Broadcom/Qualcomm merger. And it specifically mentioned the threat Huawei posed in the 5G space.The Trump administration even threatened to take things one step further…Nationalized InfrastructureIn January 2018, leaked White House documents showed that the U.S. government was considering nationalizing the 5G network build-out.In other words, it wanted to seize control of wireless networks from AT&T (NYSE:T), Verizon (NYSE:VZ), and other service providers… and put them in the hands of the government.I had a hunch at the time that this was just a warning… a way to light a fire under the U.S. companies involved in the 5G build-out.The Trump administration was saying, "Get out there and build these 5G networks quickly, or we'll do it for you."And I was right. Trump has since said he opposes nationalizing the U.S. 5G network.But sending a warning was a very smart move by the administration. And it worked.Verizon and AT&T are already building out 5G networks in dozens of cities around the country. So are T-Mobile and Sprint, which are in the process of merging.The hope is for the U.S. to regain leadership in wireless network deployments. This will stimulate even stronger leadership in wireless network technology.If the U.S. fails, the government fears that America would depend on Chinese 5G technology. That would give China an enormous amount of leverage over the U.S.And remember, 5G is expected to create more than $12 trillion in wealth. Whoever sets the 5G precedent will be the economic powerhouse for the foreseeable future.This is a race the United States must win at all costs.Regards,Jeff Brown Editor, Exponential Tech InvestorP.S. The 5G race isn't over yet… That's why this Thursday I'm hosting a free 5G investment summit, The Final Phase of the 5G Boom.Key 5G stocks will soar 10X at least. And on August 22 at 8 p.m. ET, I'll show you how I spot these winners. I'll even give you the name of the top 5G company on my watchlist. If you're serious about investing in the 5G boom, you'll want to reserve your spot here. More From InvestorPlace * 2 Toxic Pot Stocks You Should Avoid * 10 Cheap Dividend Stocks to Load Up On * The 10 Biggest Losers from Q2 Earnings * 5 Dependable Dividend Stocks to Buy The post Trump Blocks Tech Merger to Stimulate 5G Leadership appeared first on InvestorPlace.

  • Can Huawei's Harmony Match Up to Android?
    Zacks

    Can Huawei's Harmony Match Up to Android?

    With the ban on Huawei's trade still in force, the company develops Harmony OS as a counter measure. Will this hurt Google's Android demand?

  • Keysight Gains From High Demand of 5G Design & Test Solutions
    Zacks

    Keysight Gains From High Demand of 5G Design & Test Solutions

    Keysight's (KEYS) 5G testing and design solutions is anticipated to bolster the top line.

  • U.S. to Ease Huawei Sanctions for Another 90 Days, Ross Says
    Bloomberg

    U.S. to Ease Huawei Sanctions for Another 90 Days, Ross Says

    (Bloomberg) -- Terms of Trade is a daily newsletter that untangles a world embroiled in trade wars. Sign up here. The U.S. will extend for another 90 days a limited set of exemptions that had protected rural networks and other U.S. customers from a ban on doing business with China’s Huawei Technologies Co., Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross said Monday.Some telecom companies in the U.S. are “dependent” on Huawei, and so a 90-day reprieve was deemed appropriate, Ross said in an interview with Fox Business’s Maria Bartiromo. Still, the U.S. also added more than 40 Huawei affiliates to a trade blacklist.“We’re giving them a little more time to wean themselves off,” he added. Ross said the next deadline will be around Nov. 19. He added that Commerce decided to place 46 more Huawei subsidiaries on its entity list.The announcement doesn’t address the wider national-security concerns about Huawei and answer the bigger question of whether U.S. chip companies and other major suppliers will be allowed to sell parts to China.Huawei said in a statement that the temporary relief “does not change the fact that Huawei has been treated unjustly. Today’s decision won’t have a substantial impact on Huawei’s business either way.” The move to add more of Huawei’s affiliates to the so-called Entity List “at this particular time, is politically motivated and has nothing to do with national security,” the company said.QuickTake: How Huawei Became a Target for GovernmentsPresident Donald Trump over the weekend indicated the U.S. was “doing very well with China, and talking” but also suggested he wasn’t ready to sign a trade deal.U.S. stocks rallied Monday after the Trump administration signaled progress on trade negotiations and Ross announced the extension. Huawei, China’s largest technology company by sales, has been at the heart of worsening tensions and been called a bargaining chip in thorny trade negotiations between Washington and Beijing. Trump had said he anticipated talking with Chinese President Xi Jinping “very soon” and the Huawei move may sweeten the tone of those discussions.Huawei, for its part, has been trying to carry on operations in face of U.S. sanctions on the sale of the vital technology. The company this month announced its in-house HarmonyOS, an open-source operating system that could one day serve as a replacement for Google Inc.’s Android if its access to that software is curtailed.Without Android or the numerous American silicon, technology and consultancy suppliers that Huawei does business with, many of its most promising product lines would either cease their rapid growth or be thwarted entirely.Rural AreasThe U.S. Commerce Department previously granted a three-month temporary license to Huawei’s U.S. customers shortly after the Trump administration blacklisted the Chinese company. That allowed telecom carriers in rural areas to continue using Huawei equipment and Google to provide only key Android security updates to Huawei phones.The latest extension came after Trump met in July with the chief executives of key Huawei suppliers from Alphabet Inc.’s Google and Broadcom Inc. to Intel Corp. and Qualcomm Inc. to discuss economic issues including a possible resumption of sales to Huawei. U.S. companies argued that Huawei will turn to non-American suppliers if sanctions persisted, hurting the U.S. in the long run. But trade talks with Beijing ground to a halt and China refused to resume purchases of American agricultural products.National SecurityThe announcement Monday came one day after Trump suggested that Huawei was unlikely to receive another extension, pushing back against news reports about an expected reprieve.“At this moment, it looks much more like we’re not going to do business,” Trump told reporters on Sunday in New Jersey. “I don’t want to do business at all, because it is a national security threat.”The president tied trade negotiations with the ongoing situation in Hong Kong, saying that a deal between the U.S. and China would be harder if there’s a violent conclusion to protests there because of concerns raised by U.S. lawmakers.Earlier this month, the trade war between the two countries intensified as the U.S. announced a next round of 10% tariffs on Chinese imports between Sept. 1 and Dec. 15. China responded with a boycott of American farm products and allowed its currency to weaken, signaling that this can help cushion the tariff blow.(Updates with Huawei reaction in fifth paragraph.)\--With assistance from Gao Yuan and Kasia Klimasinska.To contact the reporters on this story: Vlad Savov in Tokyo at vsavov5@bloomberg.net;Jordan Fabian in New York at jfabian6@bloomberg.net;Shawn Donnan in Washington at sdonnan@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Edwin Chan at echan273@bloomberg.net, Elizabeth Wasserman, Sarah McGregorFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Investing.com

    StockBeat: Semis Flying High, Led by Micron, as Huawei Ban Gets Pushed Back

    Investing.com - Micron (NASDAQ:MU) led semiconductor stocks higher on Monday, underpinning a broader rally in tech, as Washington decided to extended a reprieve given to Huawei that allowed the Chinese telecom to continue to do business with U.S. companies.

  • What's in the Offing for Keysight (KEYS) in Q3 Earnings?
    Zacks

    What's in the Offing for Keysight (KEYS) in Q3 Earnings?

    Keysight (KEYS) rides on robust adoption driven by high demand for 5G design and test solutions primarily from telecom vendors, and a strong pipeline for new business bookings.

  • Investing.com

    Stocks: Wall Street Surges as U.S. Extends Huawei Leniency

    Investing.com -- U.S. stocks surged at the start of the new week, with the Dow Jones rising nearly 300 points as the federal government signaled more soft-pedaling on the trade war with China for the time being.

  • How Trump's Huawei Decision Could Shake Up Tech Stocks
    Investopedia

    How Trump's Huawei Decision Could Shake Up Tech Stocks

    U.S. sanctions against Chinese tech giant Huawei were suspended through Monday, Aug. 19. What the Trump administration does next has big implications.

  • Trump administration has ‘a lot of interest’ in input from companies affected by trade war
    Yahoo Finance

    Trump administration has ‘a lot of interest’ in input from companies affected by trade war

    Qualcomm CEO Steve Mollenkopf shared how he is educating the White House on how technology is affected by the U.S.-China trade war.

  • Julian Robertson Buys 3 Stocks in 2nd Quarter
    GuruFocus.com

    Julian Robertson Buys 3 Stocks in 2nd Quarter

    New positions include David Tepper’s former top holding Micron Technology Continue reading...

  • Gene Munster: 'We don't expect tariffs on Apple products'
    Yahoo Finance

    Gene Munster: 'We don't expect tariffs on Apple products'

    Loup Ventures Managing Partner Gene Munster says he doesn’t expect tariffs on Apple products despite Wall Street’s widespread speculation that the tech giant will be among the companies hurt by the U.S.-China trade war. “This is a critical misunderstanding. Ultimately, Apple products really don't have much tariff risk,” Munster said in an interview with Yahoo Finance’s The Final Round. “The reason is that Apple is an iconic U.S. brand that the U.S. government doesn't want to jeopardize. We don't expect tariffs on Apple products.”

  • Qualcomm CEO: We're not 'bitter enemies' with Apple despite legal battle
    Yahoo Finance

    Qualcomm CEO: We're not 'bitter enemies' with Apple despite legal battle

    Qualcomm and Apple have turned the page and are partnering on 5G chip service, according to Qualcomm CEO Steve Mollenkopf.

  • Qualcomm CEO: Your access to unlimited data plans will 'grow dramatically' under 5G
    Yahoo Finance

    Qualcomm CEO: Your access to unlimited data plans will 'grow dramatically' under 5G

    Qualcomm is committed to building a sustainable fifth-generation cellular network (5G), which CEO Steve Mollenkopf says will have a big impact on the American consumer.

  • Influencers Transcript: Qualcomm CEO Steve Mollencopf, August 15, 2019
    Yahoo Finance

    Influencers Transcript: Qualcomm CEO Steve Mollencopf, August 15, 2019

    Yahoo Finance Editor-in-Chief Andy Serwer sits down with Qualcomm CEO, Steve Mollenkopf.

  • US Semiconductor Firms, Huawei, and Trade War Politics
    Market Realist

    US Semiconductor Firms, Huawei, and Trade War Politics

    As US semiconductor companies firms adjust their supply chains to avoid tariffs, they are coming to terms with the trade restrictions on Huawei.

  • 5 Stocks to Avoid Amid the Ongoing Trade War
    InvestorPlace

    5 Stocks to Avoid Amid the Ongoing Trade War

    Thanks to the trade war, numerous S&P 500 stocks could arguably deserve a place on a "stocks to avoid" list. Over the last few years, much of the growth in the most-established United States equities has come from China. With almost four times the population as the U.S., many saw the country's potential when it began to turn away from communist doctrine.Now, many of these have become stocks to avoid in today's market. With a trade war that has lasted more than 18 months, many equities have sold off due to dimming earnings prospects. * 15 Growth Stocks to Buy for the Long Haul However, investors should also remember that China has built its emergence in large part on the American consumer. Their need for access to U.S. markets should lead to an eventual trade deal.InvestorPlace - Stock Market News, Stock Advice & Trading TipsBut until the U.S. and China sign such an agreement, the following companies should remain stocks to avoid. Stock to Avoid: 3M (MMM)Source: Shutterstock As an applied science and manufacturing powerhouse, 3M's (NYSE:MMM) dependence on China should not surprise anyone. In 2018, 31.3% of the company's revenues came from the Asia-Pacific region, of which China is a dominate influence. It comes as somewhat of a shock that in what many consider the "century of Asia," revenues from that region have fallen over the last year, helping to make MMM stock one of these five stocks to avoid.Moreover, the firm once known as Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing Company faces issues of its own. It remains a conglomerate in an era when such business groupings make less sense. Also, although it continues to innovate, e-commerce has made it easier for small companies to invent competing products and bring them to market.MMM stock has lost 37% of its value since the trade war began. Despite this loss, investors will likely not rush in at a forward price-to-earnings ratio of almost 16. Nor will they want to buy 3M stock with a predicted long-term growth average of 3.4%. They might react to the dividend yield that has moved near 3.5%. However, with a payout ratio above 56%, even the dividend faces some dangers.While investors should not write this company off, MMM's profit growth will struggle to gain traction without help from Chinese consumers and businesses. General Motors (GM)Source: Shutterstock Arguably, all U.S. car companies could make the stocks to avoid list due to the trade war alone. However, General Motors (NYSE:GM) likely faces the most pain. GM stock has seen little price growth since it resumed trading in 2010. In 2018, GM sold almost 700,000 more vehicles in China than in the U.S.GM has long faced struggles with sales growth in other regions. This includes North America, where it would struggle to earn a profit it not for strong truck and SUV sales. Hence, General Motors' overall sales growth depends on China. Due to tariffs, investors do not seem optimistic that this growth will materialize.On the surface, GM stock looks like a bargain. It trades at around six times forward earnings and its dividend yields almost 4%. Still, with no average profit growth expected over the next five years, investors should see little reason to buy. * 7 Safe Dividend Stocks for Investors to Buy Right Now Even without tariffs, GM and its peers would struggle in China amid intense competition. However, GM's P/E ratio likely prices in these troubles. If it can escape the tariffs, GM stock may finally sustain a move higher. Still, with the specter of these import duties, GM will remain cheap for a reason. Las Vegas Sands (LVS)Source: Shutterstock Despite the company name, the growth of Las Vegas Sands (NYSE:LVS) depends on mainland China. Five of the company's nine casinos operate in Macao, a special administrative region of China.Because China has banned gambling outside of Macao, the company's significant presence in this region would seemingly guarantee LVS stock billions in revenue. However, as the Chinese spend less amid the tariffs, they have also gambled less in Macao's casinos.This has devastated LVS stock. Las Vegas Sands peaked at over $81 per share in June 2018. Thanks to reduced revenue related to the tariffs, the stock has fallen by more than 35% to the $52 per share range. Over the last year, it has tested the high-$40's per share range more than once only to bounce back.That said, LVS maintains a forward P/E of about 15.6, and analysts expect meager long-term growth. This does not make Las Vegas Sands cheap. Still, a trade deal, or even the hint of one, could take it off of the stocks to avoid list. As late as July, LVS stock traded in the mid-$60's per share range simply due to the earlier optimism of a trade agreement. Unless such confidence leads to an actual deal, investors should stay away. Qualcomm (QCOM)Source: Shutterstock By most measures, Qualcomm (NASDAQ:QCOM) stock should not find itself on a stocks to avoid list. The world's smartphones depend on its chipsets to operate. The U.S. Department of Justice recently filed an amicus brief asking that Qualcomm be granted reprieve in a ruling that labeled the company a monopoly. These chipsets will help lead the 5G revolution, and even Chinese smartphone users cannot afford for tariffs to block Qualcomm's technology.Moreover, QCOM stock trades at a low valuation given its growth prospects. The forward P/E ratio is close to 16.7 as of the time of this writing. However, this buys average annual growth of an estimated 27.03% per year over the next five years.Still, the company depends on China for about two-thirds of Qualcomm's revenue. Despite its headquarters in San Diego, this makes the company a de facto Chinese equity. If tariffs further hurt QCOM stock, it will struggle to meet analyst growth targets. Even a resolution with the government or a better-than-expected 5G rollout may not save Qualcomm stock in that instance. * 8 Dividend Aristocrat Stocks to Buy Now No Matter What Qualcomm will wield tremendous power as 5G rolls out. For this reason alone, I would recommend buying QCOM stock in most cases. However, without a resolution to the trade dispute, stockholders will struggle to benefit from the 5G technological revolution. Starbucks (SBUX)Source: Shutterstock Strangely, Starbucks (NASDAQ:SBUX) stock has become one of the stocks to avoid due to the company's success. SBUX stock has risen by more than 80% over the last year. It also increased following its latest earnings report as comparable-store sales across the world rose by 6%.Still, saturation in both the U.S. and Canada has forced the company to look abroad for growth. Over the last few years, it has made expansion across China a primary growth goal. As of January, the company had established 3,684 stores in China, its second-highest store count behind the U.S.Moreover, Starbucks faces an emerging competitor in Luckin Coffee (NASDAQ:LK). Luckin has existed for less than two years. However, the Beijing-based coffee house opens a new store every 15 hours on average. Such a threat would constitute a challenge to Starbucks under the best of circumstances. However, a brutal tariff war could further undermine the Seattle-based coffee chain.China has helped keep earnings increases for Starbucks in the double digits. However, one has to question if investors will continue to pay more than 30 times forward earnings should the trade war end the growth of Starbucks China. This uncertainty, coupled with the multiple, should make SBUX one of the stocks to avoid.As of this writing, Will Healy did not hold a position in any of the aforementioned stocks. You can follow Will on Twitter at @HealyWriting. More From InvestorPlace * 2 Toxic Pot Stocks You Should Avoid * 15 Growth Stocks to Buy for the Long Haul * 5 More Cloud Stocks With Plenty of Potential * 5 Clean Energy ETFs to Buy for 2019 The post 5 Stocks to Avoid Amid the Ongoing Trade War appeared first on InvestorPlace.

  • The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Intel, QUALCOMM, Micron Technology, Advanced Micro Devices, Skyworks Solutions and Apple
    Zacks

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Intel, QUALCOMM, Micron Technology, Advanced Micro Devices, Skyworks Solutions and Apple

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Intel, QUALCOMM, Micron Technology, Advanced Micro Devices, Skyworks Solutions and Apple