QCOM - QUALCOMM Incorporated

NasdaqGS - NasdaqGS Real Time Price. Currency in USD
74.87
+1.59 (+2.17%)
At close: 4:00PM EDT
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous Close73.28
Open74.58
Bid74.81 x 3000
Ask75.20 x 1100
Day's Range74.14 - 75.53
52 Week Range49.10 - 90.34
Volume7,918,419
Avg. Volume13,737,823
Market Cap91.016B
Beta (3Y Monthly)1.64
PE Ratio (TTM)27.40
EPS (TTM)N/A
Earnings DateN/A
Forward Dividend & Yield2.48 (3.48%)
Ex-Dividend Date2019-09-11
1y Target EstN/A
Trade prices are not sourced from all markets
  • Stock market news: August 19, 2019
    Yahoo Finance

    Stock market news: August 19, 2019

    U.S. stocks rallied Monday morning in an at least temporary reprieve after a mid-August rout. U.S. government bond yields rose across the curve, led by yields on 30-year bonds and 10-year notes.

  • U.S. to Ease Huawei Sanctions for Another 90 Days, Ross Says
    Bloomberg

    U.S. to Ease Huawei Sanctions for Another 90 Days, Ross Says

    (Bloomberg) -- Terms of Trade is a daily newsletter that untangles a world embroiled in trade wars. Sign up here. The U.S. will extend for another 90 days a limited set of exemptions that had protected rural networks and other U.S. customers from a ban on doing business with China’s Huawei Technologies Co., Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross said Monday.Some telecom companies in the U.S. are “dependent” on Huawei, and so a 90-day reprieve was deemed appropriate, Ross said in an interview with Fox Business’s Maria Bartiromo. Still, the U.S. also added more than 40 Huawei affiliates to a trade blacklist.“We’re giving them a little more time to wean themselves off,” he added. Ross said the next deadline will be around Nov. 19. He added that Commerce decided to place 46 more Huawei subsidiaries on its entity list.The announcement doesn’t address the wider national-security concerns about Huawei and answer the bigger question of whether U.S. chip companies and other major suppliers will be allowed to sell parts to China.Huawei said in a statement that the temporary relief “does not change the fact that Huawei has been treated unjustly. Today’s decision won’t have a substantial impact on Huawei’s business either way.” The move to add more of Huawei’s affiliates to the so-called Entity List “at this particular time, is politically motivated and has nothing to do with national security,” the company said.QuickTake: How Huawei Became a Target for GovernmentsPresident Donald Trump over the weekend indicated the U.S. was “doing very well with China, and talking” but also suggested he wasn’t ready to sign a trade deal.U.S. stocks rallied Monday after the Trump administration signaled progress on trade negotiations and Ross announced the extension. Huawei, China’s largest technology company by sales, has been at the heart of worsening tensions and been called a bargaining chip in thorny trade negotiations between Washington and Beijing. Trump had said he anticipated talking with Chinese President Xi Jinping “very soon” and the Huawei move may sweeten the tone of those discussions.Huawei, for its part, has been trying to carry on operations in face of U.S. sanctions on the sale of the vital technology. The company this month announced its in-house HarmonyOS, an open-source operating system that could one day serve as a replacement for Google Inc.’s Android if its access to that software is curtailed.Without Android or the numerous American silicon, technology and consultancy suppliers that Huawei does business with, many of its most promising product lines would either cease their rapid growth or be thwarted entirely.Rural AreasThe U.S. Commerce Department previously granted a three-month temporary license to Huawei’s U.S. customers shortly after the Trump administration blacklisted the Chinese company. That allowed telecom carriers in rural areas to continue using Huawei equipment and Google to provide only key Android security updates to Huawei phones.The latest extension came after Trump met in July with the chief executives of key Huawei suppliers from Alphabet Inc.’s Google and Broadcom Inc. to Intel Corp. and Qualcomm Inc. to discuss economic issues including a possible resumption of sales to Huawei. U.S. companies argued that Huawei will turn to non-American suppliers if sanctions persisted, hurting the U.S. in the long run. But trade talks with Beijing ground to a halt and China refused to resume purchases of American agricultural products.National SecurityThe announcement Monday came one day after Trump suggested that Huawei was unlikely to receive another extension, pushing back against news reports about an expected reprieve.“At this moment, it looks much more like we’re not going to do business,” Trump told reporters on Sunday in New Jersey. “I don’t want to do business at all, because it is a national security threat.”The president tied trade negotiations with the ongoing situation in Hong Kong, saying that a deal between the U.S. and China would be harder if there’s a violent conclusion to protests there because of concerns raised by U.S. lawmakers.Earlier this month, the trade war between the two countries intensified as the U.S. announced a next round of 10% tariffs on Chinese imports between Sept. 1 and Dec. 15. China responded with a boycott of American farm products and allowed its currency to weaken, signaling that this can help cushion the tariff blow.(Updates with Huawei reaction in fifth paragraph.)\--With assistance from Gao Yuan and Kasia Klimasinska.To contact the reporters on this story: Vlad Savov in Tokyo at vsavov5@bloomberg.net;Jordan Fabian in New York at jfabian6@bloomberg.net;Shawn Donnan in Washington at sdonnan@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Edwin Chan at echan273@bloomberg.net, Elizabeth Wasserman, Sarah McGregorFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Investing.com

    StockBeat: Semis Flying High, Led by Micron, as Huawei Ban Gets Pushed Back

    Investing.com - Micron (NASDAQ:MU) led semiconductor stocks higher on Monday, underpinning a broader rally in tech, as Washington decided to extended a reprieve given to Huawei that allowed the Chinese telecom to continue to do business with U.S. companies.

  • What's in the Offing for Keysight (KEYS) in Q3 Earnings?
    Zacks

    What's in the Offing for Keysight (KEYS) in Q3 Earnings?

    Keysight (KEYS) rides on robust adoption driven by high demand for 5G design and test solutions primarily from telecom vendors, and a strong pipeline for new business bookings.

  • Investing.com

    Stocks: Wall Street Surges as U.S. Extends Huawei Leniency

    Investing.com -- U.S. stocks surged at the start of the new week, with the Dow Jones rising nearly 300 points as the federal government signaled more soft-pedaling on the trade war with China for the time being.

  • How Trump's Huawei Decision Could Shake Up Tech Stocks
    Investopedia

    How Trump's Huawei Decision Could Shake Up Tech Stocks

    U.S. sanctions against Chinese tech giant Huawei were suspended through Monday, Aug. 19. What the Trump administration does next has big implications.

  • Trump administration has ‘a lot of interest’ in input from companies affected by trade war
    Yahoo Finance

    Trump administration has ‘a lot of interest’ in input from companies affected by trade war

    Qualcomm CEO Steve Mollenkopf shared how he is educating the White House on how technology is affected by the U.S.-China trade war.

  • Julian Robertson Buys 3 Stocks in 2nd Quarter
    GuruFocus.com

    Julian Robertson Buys 3 Stocks in 2nd Quarter

    New positions include David Tepper’s former top holding Micron Technology Continue reading...

  • Gene Munster: 'We don't expect tariffs on Apple products'
    Yahoo Finance

    Gene Munster: 'We don't expect tariffs on Apple products'

    Loup Ventures Managing Partner Gene Munster says he doesn’t expect tariffs on Apple products despite Wall Street’s widespread speculation that the tech giant will be among the companies hurt by the U.S.-China trade war. “This is a critical misunderstanding. Ultimately, Apple products really don't have much tariff risk,” Munster said in an interview with Yahoo Finance’s The Final Round. “The reason is that Apple is an iconic U.S. brand that the U.S. government doesn't want to jeopardize. We don't expect tariffs on Apple products.”

  • Qualcomm CEO: We're not 'bitter enemies' with Apple despite legal battle
    Yahoo Finance

    Qualcomm CEO: We're not 'bitter enemies' with Apple despite legal battle

    Qualcomm and Apple have turned the page and are partnering on 5G chip service, according to Qualcomm CEO Steve Mollenkopf.

  • Qualcomm CEO: Your access to unlimited data plans will 'grow dramatically' under 5G
    Yahoo Finance

    Qualcomm CEO: Your access to unlimited data plans will 'grow dramatically' under 5G

    Qualcomm is committed to building a sustainable fifth-generation cellular network (5G), which CEO Steve Mollenkopf says will have a big impact on the American consumer.

  • Influencers Transcript: Qualcomm CEO Steve Mollencopf, August 15, 2019
    Yahoo Finance

    Influencers Transcript: Qualcomm CEO Steve Mollencopf, August 15, 2019

    Yahoo Finance Editor-in-Chief Andy Serwer sits down with Qualcomm CEO, Steve Mollenkopf.

  • US Semiconductor Firms, Huawei, and Trade War Politics
    Market Realist

    US Semiconductor Firms, Huawei, and Trade War Politics

    As US semiconductor companies firms adjust their supply chains to avoid tariffs, they are coming to terms with the trade restrictions on Huawei.

  • 5 Stocks to Avoid Amid the Ongoing Trade War
    InvestorPlace

    5 Stocks to Avoid Amid the Ongoing Trade War

    Thanks to the trade war, numerous S&P 500 stocks could arguably deserve a place on a "stocks to avoid" list. Over the last few years, much of the growth in the most-established United States equities has come from China. With almost four times the population as the U.S., many saw the country's potential when it began to turn away from communist doctrine.Now, many of these have become stocks to avoid in today's market. With a trade war that has lasted more than 18 months, many equities have sold off due to dimming earnings prospects. * 15 Growth Stocks to Buy for the Long Haul However, investors should also remember that China has built its emergence in large part on the American consumer. Their need for access to U.S. markets should lead to an eventual trade deal.InvestorPlace - Stock Market News, Stock Advice & Trading TipsBut until the U.S. and China sign such an agreement, the following companies should remain stocks to avoid. Stock to Avoid: 3M (MMM)Source: Shutterstock As an applied science and manufacturing powerhouse, 3M's (NYSE:MMM) dependence on China should not surprise anyone. In 2018, 31.3% of the company's revenues came from the Asia-Pacific region, of which China is a dominate influence. It comes as somewhat of a shock that in what many consider the "century of Asia," revenues from that region have fallen over the last year, helping to make MMM stock one of these five stocks to avoid.Moreover, the firm once known as Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing Company faces issues of its own. It remains a conglomerate in an era when such business groupings make less sense. Also, although it continues to innovate, e-commerce has made it easier for small companies to invent competing products and bring them to market.MMM stock has lost 37% of its value since the trade war began. Despite this loss, investors will likely not rush in at a forward price-to-earnings ratio of almost 16. Nor will they want to buy 3M stock with a predicted long-term growth average of 3.4%. They might react to the dividend yield that has moved near 3.5%. However, with a payout ratio above 56%, even the dividend faces some dangers.While investors should not write this company off, MMM's profit growth will struggle to gain traction without help from Chinese consumers and businesses. General Motors (GM)Source: Shutterstock Arguably, all U.S. car companies could make the stocks to avoid list due to the trade war alone. However, General Motors (NYSE:GM) likely faces the most pain. GM stock has seen little price growth since it resumed trading in 2010. In 2018, GM sold almost 700,000 more vehicles in China than in the U.S.GM has long faced struggles with sales growth in other regions. This includes North America, where it would struggle to earn a profit it not for strong truck and SUV sales. Hence, General Motors' overall sales growth depends on China. Due to tariffs, investors do not seem optimistic that this growth will materialize.On the surface, GM stock looks like a bargain. It trades at around six times forward earnings and its dividend yields almost 4%. Still, with no average profit growth expected over the next five years, investors should see little reason to buy. * 7 Safe Dividend Stocks for Investors to Buy Right Now Even without tariffs, GM and its peers would struggle in China amid intense competition. However, GM's P/E ratio likely prices in these troubles. If it can escape the tariffs, GM stock may finally sustain a move higher. Still, with the specter of these import duties, GM will remain cheap for a reason. Las Vegas Sands (LVS)Source: Shutterstock Despite the company name, the growth of Las Vegas Sands (NYSE:LVS) depends on mainland China. Five of the company's nine casinos operate in Macao, a special administrative region of China.Because China has banned gambling outside of Macao, the company's significant presence in this region would seemingly guarantee LVS stock billions in revenue. However, as the Chinese spend less amid the tariffs, they have also gambled less in Macao's casinos.This has devastated LVS stock. Las Vegas Sands peaked at over $81 per share in June 2018. Thanks to reduced revenue related to the tariffs, the stock has fallen by more than 35% to the $52 per share range. Over the last year, it has tested the high-$40's per share range more than once only to bounce back.That said, LVS maintains a forward P/E of about 15.6, and analysts expect meager long-term growth. This does not make Las Vegas Sands cheap. Still, a trade deal, or even the hint of one, could take it off of the stocks to avoid list. As late as July, LVS stock traded in the mid-$60's per share range simply due to the earlier optimism of a trade agreement. Unless such confidence leads to an actual deal, investors should stay away. Qualcomm (QCOM)Source: Shutterstock By most measures, Qualcomm (NASDAQ:QCOM) stock should not find itself on a stocks to avoid list. The world's smartphones depend on its chipsets to operate. The U.S. Department of Justice recently filed an amicus brief asking that Qualcomm be granted reprieve in a ruling that labeled the company a monopoly. These chipsets will help lead the 5G revolution, and even Chinese smartphone users cannot afford for tariffs to block Qualcomm's technology.Moreover, QCOM stock trades at a low valuation given its growth prospects. The forward P/E ratio is close to 16.7 as of the time of this writing. However, this buys average annual growth of an estimated 27.03% per year over the next five years.Still, the company depends on China for about two-thirds of Qualcomm's revenue. Despite its headquarters in San Diego, this makes the company a de facto Chinese equity. If tariffs further hurt QCOM stock, it will struggle to meet analyst growth targets. Even a resolution with the government or a better-than-expected 5G rollout may not save Qualcomm stock in that instance. * 8 Dividend Aristocrat Stocks to Buy Now No Matter What Qualcomm will wield tremendous power as 5G rolls out. For this reason alone, I would recommend buying QCOM stock in most cases. However, without a resolution to the trade dispute, stockholders will struggle to benefit from the 5G technological revolution. Starbucks (SBUX)Source: Shutterstock Strangely, Starbucks (NASDAQ:SBUX) stock has become one of the stocks to avoid due to the company's success. SBUX stock has risen by more than 80% over the last year. It also increased following its latest earnings report as comparable-store sales across the world rose by 6%.Still, saturation in both the U.S. and Canada has forced the company to look abroad for growth. Over the last few years, it has made expansion across China a primary growth goal. As of January, the company had established 3,684 stores in China, its second-highest store count behind the U.S.Moreover, Starbucks faces an emerging competitor in Luckin Coffee (NASDAQ:LK). Luckin has existed for less than two years. However, the Beijing-based coffee house opens a new store every 15 hours on average. Such a threat would constitute a challenge to Starbucks under the best of circumstances. However, a brutal tariff war could further undermine the Seattle-based coffee chain.China has helped keep earnings increases for Starbucks in the double digits. However, one has to question if investors will continue to pay more than 30 times forward earnings should the trade war end the growth of Starbucks China. This uncertainty, coupled with the multiple, should make SBUX one of the stocks to avoid.As of this writing, Will Healy did not hold a position in any of the aforementioned stocks. You can follow Will on Twitter at @HealyWriting. More From InvestorPlace * 2 Toxic Pot Stocks You Should Avoid * 15 Growth Stocks to Buy for the Long Haul * 5 More Cloud Stocks With Plenty of Potential * 5 Clean Energy ETFs to Buy for 2019 The post 5 Stocks to Avoid Amid the Ongoing Trade War appeared first on InvestorPlace.

  • The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Intel, QUALCOMM, Micron Technology, Advanced Micro Devices, Skyworks Solutions and Apple
    Zacks

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Intel, QUALCOMM, Micron Technology, Advanced Micro Devices, Skyworks Solutions and Apple

    The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Intel, QUALCOMM, Micron Technology, Advanced Micro Devices, Skyworks Solutions and Apple

  • Here’s Why and Where You Buy Qualcomm Stock
    InvestorPlace

    Here’s Why and Where You Buy Qualcomm Stock

    While there's a lot at of risk behind Qualcomm (NASDAQ:QCOM) stock, there's plenty of opportunity. And with the support of the QCOM stock chart, it's time for contrarian-minded investors to put shares on the radar for buying.Source: Shutterstock An escalating trade war with China. Global economic concerns. Interest rates. Worries like those have certainly helped wreak havoc on stock portfolios lately. But QCOM stock can more than one-up those troubles as a bevy of headwinds and problems have systematically pressured shares by roughly 23% over the past three months.So, what gives?InvestorPlace - Stock Market News, Stock Advice & Trading TipsWhy is QCOM stock under so much pressure compared to a decline of around 5.5% in the Nasdaq?For one, the wireless technology giant remains embroiled in legal proceedings. In a twisted sort of fate for QCOM bulls, following this spring's long-awaited, favorable ruling against Apple (NASDAQ:AAPL), a U.S. District Court ruling went against Qualcomm and ordered the company to change their selling practices. Now, with the appeals process underway, it's easy enough to appreciate why investors have bailed on QCOM stock and its seemingly constant, lengthy and costly legal battles.A recent earnings report has also been problematic after Qualcomm delivered weaker-than-forecast and declining revenues for its third quarter. Possibly more troubling, management fingered lower 4G demand and cut its sales guidance for Q4 as customers await the transition to 5G technology, which isn't expected to start in earnest until 2020.Nobody doubts Qualcomm's place in the 5G food chain. The company is a leader in the space. But many investors are increasingly fearful the higher costs and tighter margins for 5G phones will invariably lead to a roll-out that could be an expensive dud, rather than the second coming, which QCOM stock's management is forecasting. * 10 Real Estate Investments to Ride Out the Current Storm So, what's the good news, if any? Those fears are now offering investors an the opportunity to buy Qualcomm stock at supportive, risk-adjusted levels before the story for Qualcomm changes. QCOM Stock Weekly ChartIt has been a roller coaster of a year in QCOM stock, but ultimately a constructive and profitable one for bullish investors. Now and courtesy of today's headline risks, it's time to consider buying QCOM stock at opportunistic and technically well-supported prices.Shares of QCOM are currently setting up in a higher low pattern on the weekly chart. The first of the lows followed the post-Apple ruling, which took shares modestly beneath prior channel resistance before finding a bottom secured by the 62% retracement level and a confirmed doji candlestick.Today's second weekly pivot low is more durable. A fully-formed hammer pattern has found technical backing from the 50% level, channel resistance now acting as support, as well as a lesser 76% level tied to QCOM's May low. With shares also oversold on the weekly stochastics, all that's missing for a promising contrarian-based long entry is confirmation of a bottom. The QCOM Stock TradeGiven what has been said, Qualcomm stock is a name to put on the radar for purchase above last week's hammer high of $72.19. I'd suggest trimming position exposure in-between $80 - $82. And to minimize downside risk, respecting the chart and not the headlines will make this opportunity a smarter risk-adjusted one.Disclosure: Investment accounts under Christopher Tyler's management do not currently own positions in any securities mentioned in this article. The information offered is based upon Christopher Tyler's observations and strictly intended for educational purposes only; the use of which is the responsibility of the individual. For additional options-based strategies, related musings or to ask a question, you can find and follow Chris on Twitter @Options_CAT and StockTwits. More From InvestorPlace * 2 Toxic Pot Stocks You Should Avoid * 10 Real Estate Investments to Ride Out the Current Storm * 7 Marijuana Penny Stocks to Consider for Those Who Can Handle Risk * 7 Safe Dividend Stocks for Investors to Buy Right Now The post Herea€™s Why and Where You Buy Qualcomm Stock appeared first on InvestorPlace.

  • Investing.com

    StockBeat - Nvidia Soars Ahead of Earnings After Trump Delays Tariffs

    Investing.com - Nvidia rallied on Tuesday thanks to a timely boost ahead of its quarterly report due later this week after the U.S. delayed some tariffs on Chinese goods, lifting investor sentiment on chipmakers.

  • Trade War Dampens U.S. Chipmakers, Not Huawei: Here's Why
    Zacks

    Trade War Dampens U.S. Chipmakers, Not Huawei: Here's Why

    Intensifying trade war is affecting U.S. chip companies more than Huawei while Asian chipmakers are benefiting.

  • Factors Likely to Influence Lenovo's (LNVGY) Q1 Earnings
    Zacks

    Factors Likely to Influence Lenovo's (LNVGY) Q1 Earnings

    Lenovo's (LNVGY) focus on product innovation and introducing new products is anticipated positively impact first-quarter results. Also, acquisition synergies and strong expansion are likely to favor first-quarter results.

  • Huawei Hires Trade Lobbyists as Sales Slow in U.S.-China Fight
    Bloomberg

    Huawei Hires Trade Lobbyists as Sales Slow in U.S.-China Fight

    (Bloomberg) -- Terms of Trade is a daily newsletter that untangles a world embroiled in trade wars. Sign up here. Huawei Technologies Co. hired the law firm Sidley Austin LLP to lobby on trade as the U.S. pressures allies to join it in blacklisting the Chinese telecom giant and the company finds itself increasingly mired in President Donald Trump’s trade war with Beijing.The lobbying, which began in July, will focus on export controls, trade sanctions “and other national security-related topics,” according to a disclosure filed with the U.S. Senate. The document shows that Huawei is deepening its ties to Sidley Austin, which is already working on the company’s legal challenges in the U.S., while also ramping up its lobbying presence.Huawei, which is under an existential threat after the Trump administration blocked it from buying American technology over national-security concerns, has been drawn into the latest escalation of the trade war.Only six weeks ago, following a meeting in Japan with Chinese President Xi Jinping, Trump said he’d delay imposing some restrictions on U.S. companies’ sales to Huawei. The U.S. even invited companies to apply for licenses under an exemption to the Huawei ban.But Bloomberg reported on Aug. 8 that the White House was holding off any decisions on those licenses. The delay follows a series of rapid-fire, tit-for-tat moves including Trump announcing plans to impose tariffs on $300 billion of Chinese imports in September and China halting purchases of U.S farm goods. The U.S. also declared China a currency manipulator.Deepens TiesSidley Austin is already defending Huawei and a U.S. affiliate against charges that they defrauded at least four banks by concealing business dealings in Iran in violation of U.S. sanctions.U.S. prosecutors are seeking to disqualify the company’s lead lawyer in the case, James Cole, because they say his former role as the No. 2 at the Justice Department gave him access to classified information that represents an “obvious conflict of interest.” A hearing has been scheduled in the matter in September.Meng Wanzhou, Huawei’s chief financial officer and the daughter of its billionaire founder, Ren Zhengfei, is also charged in the case. She remains free on bail in Vancouver while she fights extradition to the U.S.Sidley is also representing Huawei in a suit against the U.S. over seizure of telecommunications equipment during an investigation into whether the gear required export licenses. Neither Cole nor the lawyers listed in that lawsuit are among the lobbyists on the disclosure.The Chinese company is one of the world’s biggest purchasers of semiconductors. Continuing those sales is crucial to the fortunes of chipmakers such as Intel Corp., Qualcomm Inc. and Broadcom Inc., who sent their chief executives to meet with Trump in July.Huawei has seen a dramatic slowdown in sales growth as it deals with the U.S. campaign.Alphabet Inc.’s Google stopped providing Huawei with a version of its Android operating system, which lets apps run and provides mobile security on smartphones. That means Huawei, the world’s second-biggest smartphone seller, can no longer pre-install Google’s popular apps, like Gmail and YouTube, on Huawei devices.To fight back, Huawei last week unveiled an in-house operating system, called HarmonyOS, saying it can replace Android if Google’s software is barred from its future smartphones. But Ren also said the company needed a lot more time to build an apps ecosystem, a requirement for any operating software to thrive in the long run.American OnslaughtHuawei, which the U.S. says poses a risk because it must cooperate with Beijing’s espionage agencies under Chinese law, is kicking off a yearslong overhaul to create an “iron army” that can help it survive an American onslaught while protecting its lead in next-generation wireless, Ren warned in an internal memo seen by Bloomberg News.The U.S. says Huawei can build backdoors into its equipment and that it has stolen other companies’ intellectual property. The Shenzhen-based company counters that governments and customers in 170 countries use its equipment, which poses no greater cybersecurity threat than that of any communications technology vendor. Huawei says that the campaign results from Washington’s realization that the U.S. has fallen behind in developing fifth-generation mobile networks.Huawei, which had all but shut down its Washington lobbying operation at the end of 2018, has also recently hired the law firms of Steptoe & Johnson LLP and Jones Day as lobbyists. After Samir Jain, a Jones Day partner who served on President Barack Obama’s National Security Council, registered to lobby for the company, Trump criticized the move in a tweet. The company says Jain will help with legal efforts and not lobby.Sidley Austin also represents the U.S. division of Chinese video surveillance company Hangzhou Hikvision Digital Technology Co., Alibaba Group Holding Ltd. and organizations with ties to the governments of Hong Kong and Russia, according to disclosures. It also represents Bloomberg LP, the owner of Bloomberg News.\--With assistance from Ian King, Jenny Leonard, Shawn Donnan, Mark Bergen and Bill Allison.To contact the reporter on this story: Ben Brody in Washington at btenerellabr@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Sara Forden at sforden@bloomberg.net, Jillian Ward, Paula DwyerFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Qualcomm CEO on impact of 5G and Huawei ban
    Yahoo Finance Video

    Qualcomm CEO on impact of 5G and Huawei ban

    The U.S. government has granted Huawei another 90 days to buy from American suppliers. Yahoo Finance Editor-in-Chief Andy Serwer had the chance to speak with the CEO of a major competitor of Huawei: Qualcomm's Steve Mollenkopf. Serwer joined 'The Final Round' to discuss.

  • Qualcomm CEO on communicating with the White House, Congress
    Yahoo Finance Video

    Qualcomm CEO on communicating with the White House, Congress

    Yahoo Finance's Andy Serwer sat down with Qualcomm CEO Stephen Mollenkopf on the latest episode of 'Influencers With Andy Serwer', and they discussed how the Trump administration is interested in getting input from the companies that are affected by the trade war.

  • Qualcomm CEO on weak Q2, points to 5G, Huawei ban
    Yahoo Finance Video

    Qualcomm CEO on weak Q2, points to 5G, Huawei ban

    Huawei has played a major role in the U.S.-China trade war. President Trump placed a temporary ban on the company as leverage in a deal. Yahoo Finance’s The First Trade takes a peek into Andy Serwer’s interview with Qualcomm's CEO Steve Mollenkopf on how his company was hurt by the ban when it comes to 5G.

  • Steve Mollenkopf joins Influencers with Andy Serwer
    Yahoo Finance Video

    Steve Mollenkopf joins Influencers with Andy Serwer

    Yahoo Finance Editor-in-Chief Andy Serwer sits down with Qualcomm CEO, Steve Mollenkopf.

  • Why you may want to invest in semiconductors
    Yahoo Finance Video

    Why you may want to invest in semiconductors

    Yahoo Finance’s Adam Shapiro, Julie Hyman, and Brian Cheung join Hennion and Walsh Asset Management President and Chief Investment Officer Kevin Mahn and Villere Balanced Fund Portfolio Manager Lamar Villere.