QCOM - QUALCOMM Incorporated

NasdaqGS - NasdaqGS Real Time Price. Currency in USD
75.20
+2.65 (+3.65%)
As of 2:25PM EDT. Market open.
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous Close72.55
Open73.76
Bid75.47 x 3000
Ask75.48 x 1300
Day's Range73.65 - 75.69
52 Week Range49.10 - 90.34
Volume7,437,247
Avg. Volume21,176,476
Market Cap91.421B
Beta (3Y Monthly)1.59
PE Ratio (TTM)39.70
EPS (TTM)1.89
Earnings DateJul 31, 2019
Forward Dividend & Yield2.48 (3.41%)
Ex-Dividend Date2019-06-05
1y Target Est88.77
Trade prices are not sourced from all markets
  • Tech giants find loopholes in Trump administration's Huawei ban
    Yahoo Finance Video4 hours ago

    Tech giants find loopholes in Trump administration's Huawei ban

    Some of the country's biggest tech names are finding ways to still do business with Chinese tech giant Huawei, even as the White House calls the company a security risk. Yahoo Finance's tech editor Dan Howley joins The First Trade to break down how Micron, Qualcomm, Intel, and other companies are getting around the ban.

  • Bloomberg52 minutes ago

    Apple Hires Key Chip Designer From ARM as Own Efforts Ramp Up

    (Bloomberg) -- Apple Inc. hired one of ARM Holdings Inc.’s top chip engineers as the iPhone maker looks to expand its own chip development to more powerful devices, including the Mac, and new categories like a headset.The company hired Mike Filippo in May for a chip architect position, according to his LinkedIn profile. At ARM, Filippo was a lead engineer behind chip designs that power the vast majority of the world’s smartphones and tablets and was leading a new push into parts for computers. ARM, owned by SoftBank Group Corp., designs microprocessors and licenses technology that is fundamental to the chip development efforts of Apple, Samsung Electronics Co., Qualcomm Inc. and Huawei Technologies Co.Prior to his work at ARM, Filippo was also a key designer at chipmakers Advanced Micro Devices and Intel Corp. ARM confirmed Filippo’s departure. Apple didn’t respond to a request for comment.“Mike was a long-time valuable member of the ARM community,” a spokesman for the U.K.-based company said. “We appreciate all of his efforts and wish him well in his next endeavor.”For Apple, the hire could help fill the void left by the departure of Gerard Williams III earlier this year. Williams was Apple’s head architect of chips used in the iPhone and iPad. Apple’s A series chips power its mobile devices using ARM technology. Its Mac computers have used processors from Intel for nearly two decades.The company initiated a plan several years ago to replace Intel chips in its Mac computers with processors based on the ARM architecture as early as 2020. Filippo’s experience in more advanced chips like those in servers would assist in that effort. The company is also planning to expand its in-house chip making work to new device categories like a headset that meshes augmented and virtual reality, Bloomberg News has reported.To contact the reporters on this story: Mark Gurman in San Francisco at mgurman1@bloomberg.net;Ian King in San Francisco at ianking@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Tom Giles at tgiles5@bloomberg.net, Andrew Pollack, Alistair BarrFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • U.S. Companies Find Legal Ways Around Trump’s Huawei Blacklist
    Bloomberg3 hours ago

    U.S. Companies Find Legal Ways Around Trump’s Huawei Blacklist

    (Bloomberg) -- American technology companies have resumed selling certain products to Huawei Technologies Co. after concluding there are legal ways to work with the Chinese telecom giant in spite of its inclusion on a Trump Administration blacklist.Micron Technology Inc., the largest U.S. maker of computer memory chips, said on Tuesday that it had started shipping some components to Huawei after its lawyers studied export restrictions. Intel Corp., the largest microprocessor maker, has also begun selling to Huawei again, according to a person familiar with the matter. It’s not clear how many other suppliers have reached the same conclusion.The U.S. Commerce Department added Huawei last month to what’s known as an entity list, a move designed to bar the Chinese company from buying American components and software. The Trump Administration said Huawei helps Beijing in espionage and represents a security threat -- charges the company denies. Officials at Commerce and the White House are frustrated that companies have resumed Huawei shipments, according to another person familiar with the matter. The White House didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment.The chipmakers are taking advantage of certain exceptions to the export restrictions. Even when companies have headquarters in the U.S., they may be able, through ownership of overseas subsidiaries and operations, to classify their technology as foreign, according to Cross Research analyst Steven Fox. If less than 25% of the technology in a chip originates in the U.S., for example, then it may not be covered by the ban, under current rules.“It took them weeks to figure this out,” Fox said. “What they did was look at the laws and the rules and applied them to their business.”Micron, which also reported earnings on Tuesday that topped analysts’ estimates, soared as much as 14% in New York trading. Intel, Nvidia Corp. and Qualcomm Inc. also rallied, while Asian chipmakers from Tokyo Electron Ltd. to SK Hynix Inc. gained too.Micron has operations all over the world, some added through acquisitions, and it owns plants in Singapore, Japan and Taiwan. Intel has factories in China and Ireland and a major design center and production facility in Israel. The company declined to comment.Companies can legally continue some shipments to Huawei under what’s known as the de minimis rule, says Kevin Wolf, former head of the Commerce Department’s export control section.“Commodities made overseas from U.S.-origin technology are only subject to the entity list prohibitions if the technology and commodity are sensitive items controlled for ‘national security’ reasons,” Wolf said. “But a commodity made overseas from less sensitive U.S.-origin technology is not subject to the entity list prohibitions.”The de minimis threshold is 25%, according to the Commerce Department.National security hawks in the Trump Administration thought that inclusion on the entity list would ratchet up pressure on Huawei, but they didn’t understand or misinterpreted the existing rules, people familiar with internal deliberations said. Those advisers didn’t fully grasp the limits of export controls in constricting supply chains that reach deeply into China.Micron Chief Executive Officer Sanjay Mehrotra, in a conference call discussing his company’s earnings, declined to explain his analysis, despite repeated questions. In a brief interview after the call, he also wouldn’t elaborate and said he hopes the U.S. and China quickly resolve their trade dispute.The Semiconductor Industry Association trade group put out a statement aimed at supporting its members’ right to keep working with an important customer: “SIA companies are committed to rigorous compliance with U.S. export control regulations. As we have discussed with the U.S. government, it is now clear some items may be supplied to Huawei consistent with the Entity List and applicable regulations.”The trade war and Huawei sanctions put U.S. chipmakers in a tough position. They need to comply with new rules in their home country, while at the same time navigating the intricacies of business in China, an increasingly crucial market. More than 60% of the $470 billion of chips sold last year went through China.If Huawei’s American suppliers can resume some sales, that may avoid the detrimental financial impact many have been anticipating.Even though these companies have found ways to legally keep exporting some of their products to Huawei, they are prohibited from providing post-sale support like software updates, repairs or installation help. That means that while an item in a box can be shipped from Taiwan to China, for example, the company still can’t provide information on software repairs or assistance from Silicon Valley. Wolf said that, in his experience, that can be a significant handicap.Finding legal ways to sidestep restrictions is taking on added significance for U.S. companies as the Trump Administration expands curbs on technology exports to China. Last week, the Commerce Department blacklisted five Chinese entities over accusations they were developing supercomputers for military applications. Bloomberg has also reported that some Chinese video surveillance firms may be barred from U.S. suppliers.The Commerce Department could easily change the definition of what foreign-made items are subject to the regulations. That change wouldn’t require Congressional approval, Wolf said. Still, it’s not clear if the Trump administration is looking into making such changes.“Micron will continue to comply with all government and legal requirements just as we do in all our operations globally,” said Micron CEO Mehrotra. “Of course, we cannot predict whether additional government actions may further impact our ability to ship to Huawei.”(Updates with Micron, other chipmaker shares from the sixth paragraph.)To contact the reporters on this story: Ian King in San Francisco at ianking@bloomberg.net;Jenny Leonard in Washington at jleonard67@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Peter Elstrom at pelstrom@bloomberg.net, Tom GilesFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Markets, Consumers, and Businesses Have a Message for Trump
    Market Realist4 hours ago

    Markets, Consumers, and Businesses Have a Message for Trump

    The G20 Summit is scheduled for June 28–29 and will be held in Osaka, Japan. While the summit always attracts attention, it will be closely watched this year in particular due to the meeting between US President Donald Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping.

  • Qualcomm's security-boosted smartphone chip wins German certification
    Reuters5 hours ago

    Qualcomm's security-boosted smartphone chip wins German certification

    U.S. chipmaker Qualcomm has won certification from Germany's cyber watchdog for a next generation chip that boosts the security of smartphones, as applications such as mobile payments become increasingly prevalent. The company said its Snapdragon 855 mobile system on a chip (SoC) had gained a seal of approval from Germany's Federal Office for Information Security (BSI), whose certification was "known to be very rigorous and globally recognised".

  • Will Qualcomm (QCOM) Stock Win Again? Canaccord Remains Bullish
    SmarterAnalyst6 hours ago

    Will Qualcomm (QCOM) Stock Win Again? Canaccord Remains Bullish

    Investing in Qualcomm (QCOM) stock has been a rollercoaster ride over the past two months. After Qualcomm’s settlement with Apple, the stock soared as the market saw Qualcomm secures rights to provide Apple with its future 5G mobile chips. However, just a few days later, the FTC determined that Qualcomm violated antitrust laws with their royalty structures included in their contracts with smartphone manufacturers. This news shocked the market and the stock plunged as a result.The complex legal system Qualcomm will navigate over the coming months and years will determine the chip giant's future. Cannacord analyst Michael Walkley has sorted through the legal implications and remains confident in his Buy rating and $90 price target on QCOM stock. (To watch Walkley's track record, click here)Qualcomm has already filed its reply to judge Lucy Koh’s ruling on the 18th of June, and although the judge is expected to deny the appeal, Qualcomm can then appeal for a stay in the Ninth Circuit. This Ninth Circuit approach can spiral into a process that can take up to 2 years if the case reaches the US Supreme Court. Walkley believes that the Ninth Circuit will rule in Qualcomm’s favor because of the “irreparable harm to Qualcomm’s business model if not granted a stay during the appeal process.” A stay means that Qualcomm can continue its practice of charging mobile phone manufacturers a percentage of the final selling price before the litigation is settled.Another factor that gives Walkley confidence in the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals granting Qualcomm a favorable ruling is the mixed messages coming from the inner workings of the FTC. Rather than the normal five-member vote on whether a case should proceed, only three commissioners have voted, and the Commission is currently in a 2-2 deadlock on the decision. Walkley noted that “a current FTC commissioner, Christine Wilson, stated the legal theory was flawed and encouraged the higher courts to reconsider Judge Koh’s decision.” The appeals court will also take the public interest into consideration, and with Qualcomm’s immense 5G capability, a decision that damages Qualcomm’s business could hurt the wireless industry and the public interest.All in all, with much uncertainty surrounding Qualcomm’s stock in the midst of constant litigation, there may be a sizeable opportunity for investors believe Qualcomm will come out of this litigation largely unscathed. TipRanks analysis of 24 analyst ratings show a consensus Moderate Buy rating, with 14 analysts saying Buy, nine suggesting Hold and only one recommending Sell selling. The average price target among these analysts stands at $85.29, which implies a 17% upside from current levels. Read more QCOM: * Qualcomm Faces Challenges, But the Stock Remains a ‘Buy’ * Owning Qualcomm Stock Should Be Worth the Noise, Says Morgan Stanley * Susquehanna Remains Bullish on Qualcomm (QCOM) Stock as the Roller Coaster Ride Continues * A Look at Qualcomm (QCOM)-FTC Outcome and Its Impact on Apple (AAPL) More recent articles from Smarter Analyst: * Micron (MU) Stock Has a New Bull * Has Roku Stock Price Hit Its Peak? * Canopy Growth (CGC) Continues to Struggle to Find Its Identity * Apple & Google’s Vision of the Future Contrasted by Developer Resources

  • Qualcomm (QCOM) Stock Moves -0.83%: What You Should Know
    Zacks21 hours ago

    Qualcomm (QCOM) Stock Moves -0.83%: What You Should Know

    Qualcomm (QCOM) closed at $72.55 in the latest trading session, marking a -0.83% move from the prior day.

  • TheStreet.comyesterday

    Qualcomm's Spectrum Strategy Chief Talks About How 5G Is Being Deployed

    Relative to 4G, 5G will be deployed on a larger number of spectrum bands, and will also rely on a greater number of approaches for using wireless spectrum. asserts that it's well-prepared to address all of these upcoming deployments. In addition to talking with Qualcomm product marketing exec Nitin Dhiman about his firm's RF chip efforts (a recap of that discussion can be found here), I had a chance to talk with Dean Brenner, Qualcomm's VP of Spectrum Strategy and Technology Policy, about his firm's expectations for 5G spectrum usage. Brenner insists Qualcomm is pleased across the board with how governments are auctioning and allocating 5G spectrum.

  • Qualcomm Faces Second EU Fine as Vestager’s Last Big-Tech Target
    Bloomberg2 days ago

    Qualcomm Faces Second EU Fine as Vestager’s Last Big-Tech Target

    (Bloomberg) -- Qualcomm Inc. faces another European Union antitrust fine a year after being ordered to pay 997 million-euro ($1.13 billion) penalty for thwarting rival suppliers to Apple Inc., according to three people familiar with the latest case.The chip giant may be fined as soon as next month, said the people, who asked not to be named because the process isn’t public. That would make it the last U.S. technology firm to get a large antitrust penalty from Competition Commissioner Margrethe Vestager.Vestager is due to step down later this year after punishing Google with more than $9 billion in fines and ordering Apple to pay more than 14 billion euros in back taxes. She warned in May she was “definitely not done yet” with big tech as she weighs potential new probes into Amazon.com Inc., Google and Apple.The EU’s current Qualcomm investigation targets 3G chips for internet mobile dongles sold between 2009 and 2011. Regulators allege these were sold below cost in order to push Icera, now owned by Nvidia Corp., out of the market. The EU took the unusual move of sending an extra antitrust complaint to Qualcomm last year to bolster its arguments of a “price-cost” test it used to show how far below cost the prices were.Qualcomm and the European Commission declined to comment on the fine. The timing of the penalty could slip beyond the EU’s August summer break, one of the people said.Last year Qualcomm was handed the EU’s fifth-largest antitrust penalty over payments to Apple that the EU said were an illegal ploy to ensure only its chips were used in iPhones and iPads. Qualcomm is challenging the fine at the EU courts.Qualcomm, the largest maker of chips for mobile phones, is unique among semiconductor makers in that it gets most of its profit from licensing patents. Makers of handsets pay the company royalties, whether or not they use its chips. That lucrative profit pool has come under attack as governments around the world scrutinized Qualcomm’s business practices.To contact the reporters on this story: Aoife White in Brussels at awhite62@bloomberg.net;Gaspard Sebag in Paris at gsebag@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Anthony Aarons at aaarons@bloomberg.net, Peter Chapman, Molly SchuetzFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Why It’s Time to Get Over Fed Mania and Look at the Economy
    Market Realist2 days ago

    Why It’s Time to Get Over Fed Mania and Look at the Economy

    Last week, the S&P 500 (SPY) rose to a record high. Last week, Trump tweeted, “Since Election Day 2016, Stocks up almost 50%, Stocks gained 9.2 Trillion Dollars in value, and more than 5,000,000 new jobs added to the Economy.”

  • TheStreet.com4 days ago

    Qualcomm Shares Some More About its 5G RF Chip Progress

    radio-frequency (RF) chip business has been gradually gaining steam, thanks in part to a strong 5G position. Last summer, Qualcomm unveiled a pair of 5G RF module families -- one for more conventional, sub-6Ghz, spectrum bands, and another for high-frequency, millimeter-wave (mmWave) bands that have limited range but can support very high upload and download speeds. The company followed that up in February of this year by unveiling -- along with a second-gen 5G modem known as the Snapdragon X55 -- a second-gen, mmWave, antenna module and a slew of new RF products for sub-6GHz bands.

  • Qualcomm (QCOM) Faces Challenges, But the Stock Remains a ‘Buy’
    SmarterAnalyst5 days ago

    Qualcomm (QCOM) Faces Challenges, But the Stock Remains a ‘Buy’

    With Qualcomm (QCOM) shares rising 50% then quickly falling 25%, many are wondering how to play the stock.While the company scored a major victory with an agreement with Apple to develop 5G on the iPhone, it also recently lost a major court decision that effectively ruled the company had to curb some anticompetitive practices to even the playing field with their competitors. More recently, geopolitics is playing a prominent role in the stock’s volatility, with the US-China tension making investors feeling uneasy about Qualcomm and many other companies that rely on a strong US-China relationship.But in the long term, Morgan Stanley analyst James Faucette is a buyer, as he maintains his Overweight rating with a $95 price target. (To watch Faucette's track record, click here)Though Faucette is cutting his estimates for 2019 and 2020, he expects Qualcomm’s share of Apple’s production mix to increase to 60%. Faucette expects the Apple agreement to add $2 in EPS at “full ramp,” which he expects to take 18 months. But he doesn’t think it stops there, believing “further opportunities with Apple could exist in connectivity use cases beyond handset and in potential RF attachments.”Tensions between the US and China are also contributing to concern over Qualcomm’s stock. Because of the Huawei ban, Faucette says he “reduced [his] assumption of Huawei’s contribution to…$0” this quarter, from about 2% of revenue. But as Huawei is expecting to see a massive slowdown in sales and shipments, Faucette sees Qualcomm playing a role in filling the empty void. He estimates Qualcomm “could see an incremental [EPS increase of] $0.30-$0.70” as a result.Overall, Qualcomm is looked at as the leader of 5G and many see this as contributing to the agreement with Apple. As a result of the agreement, Qualcomm’s stock surged 50% in the aftermath, as rival Intel dropped out of 5G, paving the way for Qualcomm to work with Apple on bringing 5G to the iPhone. But with the recent ruling against Qualcomm, it is possible that Apple could renegotiation the terms of their deal, though many do not see this happening as Qualcomm is holding most of the cards through its leadership in 5G.All in all, while Qualcomm is facing some pressure from China and the courts, Wall Street is still bullish on the company going forward. TipRanks analysis of 24 analyst ratings shows a consensus Moderate Buy rating, with 14 analysts saying Buy, nine saying Hold and only one recommending Sell. The average price target among these analysts stands at $85.29, about 19% above current levels.Read more on QCOM: * Owning Qualcomm (QCOM) Stock Should Be Worth the Noise * Susquehanna Remains Bullish on Qualcomm (QCOM) as the Roller Coaster Ride Continues * Trump’s Trade War Hits U.S. Tech Companies from California to North Carolina * A Look at Qualcomm (QCOM)-FTC Outcome and Its Impact on Apple  More recent articles from Smarter Analyst: * Micron (MU) Stock Has a New Bull * Has Roku Stock Price Hit Its Peak? * Will Qualcomm (QCOM) Stock Win Again? Canaccord Remains Bullish * Canopy Growth (CGC) Continues to Struggle to Find Its Identity

  • Friday Apple Rumors: Apple May Use OLED Screens in MacBook and iPad
    InvestorPlace5 days ago

    Friday Apple Rumors: Apple May Use OLED Screens in MacBook and iPad

    Leading the Apple (NASDAQ:AAPL) rumor mill today is news of OLED screens coming to more devices. Today, we'll look at that and other Apple Rumors for Friday.OLED Screens: A new rumor claims that Apple is planning to bring OLED screens to more of its products, reports MacRumors. According to this rumor, the tech company is going to bring OLED screens to its tablets, as well as MacBooks. The rumor claims that AAPL is currently in talks with Samsung to have it provide the OLED screens for these devices. It also notes that the company may have to pay Samsung a fee for low OLED screen orders for the iPhone.Foxconn Advice: Foxconn founder Terry Gou is asking AAPL to move production out of China, AppleInsider notes. Gou claims that the tech company would be better off by shifting production of its devices into Taiwan. This would help it avoid the trade war between the U.S. and China, which includes heavy tariffs. This move could take years, but the Foxconn founder believes it is possible.InvestorPlace - Stock Market News, Stock Advice & Trading TipsFTC Lawsuit: Qualcomm (NASDAQ:QCOM) is dragging Apple into its legal battle with the FTC, reports 9to5Mac. The antitrust lawsuit against the company is still going on after QCOM appealed a ruling against it. To help make its case, the company is using slides from an internal presentation at AAPL. The FTC is arguing against the use of these slides, which come from its the legal battle between the two companies.Check out more recent Apple Rumors or Subscribe to Apple Rumors : RSS As of this writing, William White did not hold a position in any of the aforementioned securities. Compare Brokers The post Friday Apple Rumors: Apple May Use OLED Screens in MacBook and iPad appeared first on InvestorPlace.

  • Trade War Fears Deflate Broadcom Stock’s Valuation
    Market Realist5 days ago

    Trade War Fears Deflate Broadcom Stock’s Valuation

    Fiscal 2019 has been an interesting year for Broadcom (AVGO). Its revenue has fallen due to weak demand in the wireless communications market, but its profit margins have risen due to declining costs. While Broadcom is succeeding in improving its margins, profit is falling in dollar terms because of declining revenue.

  • U.S. FTC objects to Qualcomm submission of Apple documents in antitrust case
    Reuters6 days ago

    U.S. FTC objects to Qualcomm submission of Apple documents in antitrust case

    On Tuesday, Qualcomm submitted them to U.S. District Judge Lucy Koh in opposition to a sweeping ruling that would alter its business model as it pursues an appeal. The slides were part of the opening statement presentation in Qualcomm's separate civil trial against Apple in April but were never submitted during Qualcomm's earlier trial with the FTC. If Koh accepts them, they would become part of the record that higher courts review when Qualcomm eventually files an appeal.

  • Reuters6 days ago

    UPDATE 1-U.S. FTC objects to Qualcomm submission of Apple documents in antitrust case

    The U.S. Federal Trade Commission on Thursday objected to a move by mobile chip supplier Qualcomm Inc to introduce internal Apple Inc documents in its fight to stop the enforcement of a May antitrust ruling. On Tuesday, Qualcomm submitted them to U.S. District Judge Lucy Koh in opposition to a sweeping ruling that would alter its business model as it pursues an appeal. The slides were part of the opening statement presentation in Qualcomm's separate civil trial against Apple in April but were never submitted during Qualcomm's earlier trial with the FTC.

  • The Trade War Is Still the Market’s Biggest Concern
    Market Realist6 days ago

    The Trade War Is Still the Market’s Biggest Concern

    In Bank of America Merrill Lynch’s June 2019 survey, the trade war remained the top risk cited by 56% of the respondents. Since Trump’s tweet on May 5, trade tensions have only revived with China retaliating in kind. Time and again, Trump has also talked about bringing another $300 billion worth of Chinese imports under tariffs.

  • Grab Intel Stock While You Can Get It at These Prices
    InvestorPlace6 days ago

    Grab Intel Stock While You Can Get It at These Prices

    Intel Corporation (NASDAQ:INTC) is finally enjoying a little bit of relief. Intel's stock price jumped three percent on Tuesday and has advanced nearly five points from its recent lows. But Intel stock is still in the doghouse compared to the overall market. The S&P 500 looks set to reach new all-time highs in coming weeks, and tech stocks are roaring higher as well.Source: Intel Intel's malaise is easy to understand. It is wildly out of favor at the moment, as are other leading semiconductor companies. That's because it's hard to handicap just how long the trade war will continue dragging on. And companies like Intel are highly reliant on China for product sales.Thus, it should come as no surprise that Intel's big bounce on Tuesday came with President Trump tweeting about progress in talks with China. Regardless, however, of whether a deal comes soon or still takes a while, INTC stock is a solid bargain at today's levels.InvestorPlace - Stock Market News, Stock Advice & Trading Tips * 6 Stocks Ready to Bounce on a Trade Deal Intel Asks For Huawei ReliefWhile a lot of U.S. companies have been caught in the trade war crossfire, chipmakers have suffered the worst. That's because Chinese equipment makers tend to be the leading customers for many of these firms.Reuters reported that Huawei, for example, buys $70 billion per year of components. Of this, they spend roughly $11 billion on parts from American suppliers. Intel, Qualcom (NASDAQ:QCOM), and Micron (NASDAQ:MU) lead the way in sales to Huawei. Not surprisingly, these firms have appealed directly to the government for trade war relief.Intel's executives spoke with the Commerce Department in May, and Qualcomm has been actively lobbying the government as well. If no action is taken, Huawei is expected to shrink its international smartphone shipments by around 50 percent.It's unclear if these efforts will sway President Trump and his aides, but Trump is clearly motivated by trying to make the stock market go up. Trump has complained about Fed Chair Powell's tighter monetary policy and suggested that the Dow Jones index would be 10,000 points higher if the Fed had acted appropriately.He also tends to tweet positive remarks about the economy whenever the market is sliding. With that backdrop, one has to think Trump will try to make a deal, particularly if semiconductor companies continue to slump in the interim. Intel Stock: Super CheapIn a frothy tech market, Intel remained a bastion of value in recent years. In late 2017, that suddenly changed, however. Intel's stock price soared from $35 to nearly $60 inside of a year. That ended Intel's nearly 20 year period of stagnant stock performance following the tech bust of 2001.However, Intel stock has given back much of its recent gains. With shares down more than 20% from the recent highs while earnings continue to surge, Intel is a bargain again.How much so? It's now trading at 11x trailing earnings and just 10x forward earnings. Sure, there are some reasons for concern. Normally, also-ran AMD (NASDAQ:AMD) doesn't cause Intel much trouble. AMD, for the moment, is offering one of its most compelling product line-ups in the past decade, and that has caused some concern for Intel's market share.Make no mistake though, Intel still has far more resources and a much larger research budget. They'll keep dominating the PC chip industry for years to come. Meanwhile, other growth ventures such as Intel's push into self-driving vehicle tech offer great potential in coming years. It's amazing how the market is giving so little credit to Intel's growth prospects. Just 15x forward earnings would lift Intel's stock price to $67 per share. Strong Dividend PolicyIntel stock is also a reliable source of dividend income. With bond yields cratering again, investors have been racing into defensive stocks like utilities, REITs, and consumer staples. So far, investors haven't flocked into Intel yet. But, as an effective tech utility with a great balance sheet, conservative income investors should gravitate to Intel sooner or later.At this point, Intel is paying a 2.7% dividend. That's not huge, but it's well above the S&P 500 and the 10-year treasury bond which are both at 2.0% or lower. And that tends to come with solid dividend growth as well. Intel has averaged 8%, 6%, and 8% compounded dividend growth over the past three, five, and ten years, respectively. Intel Stock VerdictNo one knows how long the trade war will continue to drag on. I'd predicted that it would wrap up by now, and I've been wrong about that. Traders don't have a good sense either, judging by how much the market swings erratically on every new tweet from Trump's twitter account.Looking at the bigger picture, however, it's kind of silly how much impact the trade war has caused for Intel's share price. The company remains one of the most dominant positions in the tech industry. And for the first time in a while, it has a robust pipeline of growth opportunities that can cause the company's overall revenues and earnings to boom again.With the stock market pushing to new highs, Intel should catch up once trade drama simmers down. I see Intel stock hitting $60 per share - just 13x forward earnings - in the coming months.At the time of this writing, Ian Bezek owned INTC and QCOM stock. You can reach him on Twitter at @irbezek. More From InvestorPlace * 4 Top American Penny Pot Stocks (Buy Before June 21) * 7 Blue-Chip Stocks to Buy for a Noisy Market * 5 Strong Buy Biotech Stocks for the Second Half * 6 Stocks Ready to Bounce on a Trade Deal Compare Brokers The post Grab Intel Stock While You Can Get It at These Prices appeared first on InvestorPlace.

  • Missed The Chip, Nvidia Rally? 7 Ways You Can Still Play It
    Investor's Business Daily6 days ago

    Missed The Chip, Nvidia Rally? 7 Ways You Can Still Play It

    Chip shares, like Nvidia stock, are turning into a battleground for bulls and bears. The bulls are winning so far. And, there are still ways in.

  • Qualcomm (QCOM) Stock Sinks As Market Gains: What You Should Know
    Zacks7 days ago

    Qualcomm (QCOM) Stock Sinks As Market Gains: What You Should Know

    Qualcomm (QCOM) closed at $71.80 in the latest trading session, marking a -0.22% move from the prior day.

  • Blackstone CEO Says Don’t Expect a Deal at G20
    Market Realist7 days ago

    Blackstone CEO Says Don’t Expect a Deal at G20

    President Trump’s tweet about the upcoming meeting with Chinese President Xi Jinping helped boost market sentiments yesterday. Qualcomm (QCOM), Intel (INTC), and Advanced Micro Devices (AMD) rose 4.1%, 2.7%, and 4.3%, respectively.

  • Trade Resolution, Easy Fed, and Growth Can’t Hold for Long
    Market Realist7 days ago

    Trade Resolution, Easy Fed, and Growth Can’t Hold for Long

    If the Fed doesn't signal significant easing ahead, the markets could nosedive. Many analysts agree that the markets might be overpricing the Fed's rate cuts this year.

  • Amazon Might Join Qualcomm in Indian Supplier NinjaCart
    Market Realist7 days ago

    Amazon Might Join Qualcomm in Indian Supplier NinjaCart

    Amazon is interested in purchasing a stake in NinjaCart. Currently, food retail is a booming business in India. Grocery purchases accounted for more than 61% of all the retail spending in India last year.

  • Leaving China: Apple Might Move Some of Its Production
    Market Realist7 days ago

    Leaving China: Apple Might Move Some of Its Production

    Apple (AAPL) seems to be exploring options to partially move its iPhone and other product manufacturing out of China. Apple wants to move ~15%–30% of its production out of China.