RBS.L - The Royal Bank of Scotland Group plc

LSE - LSE Delayed Price. Currency in GBp
110.35
-7.70 (-6.52%)
At close: 4:35PM BST
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Performance Outlook
  • Short Term
    2W - 6W
  • Mid Term
    6W - 9M
  • Long Term
    9M+
Previous Close118.05
Open116.05
Bid108.20 x 0
Ask115.00 x 0
Day's Range110.15 - 117.85
52 Week Range2.23 - 265.00
Volume40,770,403
Avg. Volume31,524,394
Market Cap13.346B
Beta (5Y Monthly)1.48
PE Ratio (TTM)4.90
EPS (TTM)22.50
Earnings DateJul 31, 2020
Forward Dividend & YieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-Dividend DateMar 26, 2020
1y Target Est301.06
Fair Value is the appropriate price for the shares of a company, based on its earnings and growth rate also interpreted as when P/E Ratio = Growth Rate. Estimated return represents the projected annual return you might expect after purchasing shares in the company and holding them over the default time horizon of 5 years, based on the EPS growth rate that we have projected.
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