REYN - Reynolds Consumer Products Inc.

NasdaqGS - NasdaqGS Real Time Price. Currency in USD
28.85
-0.15 (-0.52%)
At close: 4:00PM EST

30.10 +1.25 (4.33%)
After hours: 7:38PM EST

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Previous Close29.00
Open28.30
Bid29.65 x 800
Ask29.00 x 1100
Day's Range27.50 - 29.46
52 Week Range27.10 - 31.99
Volume1,083,712
Avg. Volume2,381,415
Market Cap5.846B
Beta (5Y Monthly)N/A
PE Ratio (TTM)20.48
EPS (TTM)1.41
Earnings DateN/A
Forward Dividend & YieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-Dividend DateN/A
1y Target Est35.13
  • Business Wire

    Reynolds Consumer Products Inc. to Report Fourth Quarter and Fiscal Year 2019 Financial Results on March 10, 2020

    Reynolds Consumer Products Inc. (NASDAQ: REYN) (the "Company"), announced today it will report results for the fourth quarter and fiscal year ended December 31, 2019 on Tuesday, March 10, 2020 before market open.

  • 7 Reasons Not to Buy Into the Hype Over Reynolds IPO
    InvestorPlace

    7 Reasons Not to Buy Into the Hype Over Reynolds IPO

    Reynolds Consumer Products (NASDAQ:REYN), the maker of Hefty trash bags and Reynolds Wrap aluminum foil, sold 47.2 million shares at $26 each on January 30 for proceeds of $1.2 billion. The first billion-dollar listing of 2020, it is the largest offering by a household goods company.Source: iStockphoto The company marketed its stock at a price range of $25 to $28 a share. On the first day of trading, Reynolds stock gained a respectable 9.8%, closing at $28.55. While it didn't quite meet the first-day open of 1Life Healthcare (NASDAQ:ONEM), an operator of primary care clinics in the U.S. which gained 58% in its trading debut, Reynolds did show that boring names can deliver the goods for investors.Reynolds products aren't sexy, but it believes it's got a compelling investment thesis.InvestorPlace - Stock Market News, Stock Advice & Trading Tips"What's attractive to investors about our company is steady proven growth over a long period of time," Reynolds Chief Executive Officer Lance Mitchell said in an interview. "We have a very consistent, durable demand and investment thesis that's compelling." * 7 Utility Stocks to Buy That Offer Juicy Dividends Here are seven reasons you shouldn't buy into the Reynolds IPO hype. Don't Buy The Hype: IPO Investors Got HosedSource: Shutterstock Reynolds, as I said in the intro, sold its shares to the public for $26 each. Based on 202.6 million shares outstanding after the IPO, it went public with a market cap of $5.3 billion. As I write this, it's trading above $30, an $800 million increase in its market cap in just three days of trading. That gives Reynolds an enterprise value of $8.5 billion on a pro forma basis.If you turn to page 51 of its prospectus, you will see that Graeme Hart, the company's owner and chief beneficiary of its IPO, contributed $77.2 million in equity to control 77% of the company post-IPO. For anyone that's counting, he paid 50 cents a share for his ownership stake.Meanwhile, IPO investors paid $1.2 billion or 26 cents a share for the remaining 23% of the company. That's quite a deal. Hart's $77.2 million investment is now worth $4.7 billion. How did he get to this point?Hart's private equity firm, Rank Group, acquired Reynolds from Alcoa (NYSE:AA) in December 2007 for $2.7 billion, much of the payment made with borrowed funds.In 2018, Hart said the following about his leveraged buyout strategy:"Be bold," Hart said in a speech at his alma mater in New Zealand. "That means buy as big as you can, borrow as much as you can and then work the asset as hard as you can."He did that at the expense of those buying IPO shares. It's Got a Ton of DebtSource: Photo from CreditRepairExpert Source: Shutterstock As I stated previously, a big chunk of the purchase from Alcoa was made with borrowed funds. Then, in 2010, Reynolds acquired Pactiv Corp., the maker of Hefty trash bags, for $4.4 billion and the assumption of $1.5 billion in debt. That was a significant acquisition for Reynolds because today, Hefty accounts for 46% of the company's overall revenue. Without it, Reynolds wouldn't have nearly as interesting a story to tell IPO investors. As the "Use of Proceeds" section states, Reynolds will use the net proceeds to pay down some of the $4.1 billion in debt it had before its IPO. It has arranged a new term loan facility of $2.475 billion, of which $2.45 billion of it will replace the old debt. It will also have a new $250 million revolving facility that is undrawn as of the IPO.The long and the short of it is that the company's long-term debt hasn't changed, but Hart and his related companies have gotten the funds they borrowed to buy and grow Reynolds repaid. * 7 Utility Stocks to Buy That Offer Juicy Dividends Again, remember that $77 million is all it took to build a company with an $8.5 billion enterprise value. Very Little GrowthSource: Shutterstock Source: Who is Danny / Shutterstock.com As CEO Mitchell stated in the interview I referenced in the introduction, Reynolds has a history of proven growth over a long period. For this reason, he believes Reynolds is a compelling investment.I see things a little differently. In 2014, Reynolds had sales of $2.72 billion. In 2018, it had annual sales of $2.81 billion. That's a compound annual growth of less than 1% in a period of reasonably healthy economic expansion. In my eyes, that's anemic growth, at best. The company's prospectus brags that of its four key areas of focus, two of them: Cost Reduction and Automation, have to do with cutting costs rather than growing the top line. Meanwhile, Reynolds' adjusted EBITDA grew from $523 million in 2014 to $647 million in 2018, a 5.5% CAGR. That, too, isn't what you would call hitting the leather off the ball.Sure, the company discusses paying out a quarterly dividend of 22 cents a share, but I suspect in 2-3 years, that will be the only thing attractive about REYN stock. Little Growth at a Reasonable PriceSource: Who is Danny / Shutterstock.com In the first nine months ended September 30, 2019, Reynold's adjusted EBITDA grew by 4.2% over the same period a year earlier, 130 basis points lower than its four-year average. I'll assume Reynolds' 5.5% growth rate stays intact for 2019. That works out to adjusted EBITDA of $674 million, which means its enterprise value of $8.5 billion is almost 13 times EBITDA.That's certainly not expensive when compared to other household products companies. However, the likelihood of the company's adjusted EBITDA growing at a pace that keeps up with its market cap and debt accumulation growth, suggests its valuation could get expensive in a hurry. Further, Reynolds' 2018 free cash flow was $448 million. If we assume it will be 10% higher in 2019, you get $493 million. Based on an $8.5 billion enterprise value, its free cash flow yield is 5.8%. That too isn't half bad. Again, just as in the case of adjusted EBITDA, it's likely not going to be increasing its free cash flow each year at the same pace as its market cap and debt accumulation, which means its free cash flow yield won't get more attractive in the years to come. This means you're buying REYN stock today for little growth at a reasonable price. Tomorrow, you'll be getting a low growth for a nosebleed valuation. * 7 Utility Stocks to Buy That Offer Juicy Dividends There are much better buys given the risk/reward profile. Innovation Can't Happen Fast EnoughOne of Reynolds' business strategies is to drive growth through new and innovative products. To that end, it says that 21% of its revenue in fiscal 2018 was from products that were less than three years old, exceeding its annual goal of 20%.Source: Shutterstock In the prospectus, it mentions several innovative products, including the Hefty Ultra Strong product line, which was named one of 2018's most innovative products, according to Nielsen. In fact, it mentions the words innovation or innovative 101 times in the prospectus. The problem is all companies push innovation these days. In its fourth-quarter conference call, Church & Dwight (NYSE:CHD) management mentioned these same words a total of 12 times. "We've really picked up the pace of innovation for vitamins. If you look at '17 and '18, we kind of averaged six new items a year, we had 22 new items in 2019, we got 17 more coming in 2020," stated Church & Dwight CEO Matthew Farrell. Reynolds sells aluminum foil, garbage bags, food and storage bags, party cups, etc. Innovation can be a good soundbyte, but there's not a whole lot of change the company can bring to the table. It's a Controlled CompanyAs I mentioned previously, New Zealand billionaire Graeme Hart owns 77% of Reynolds post-IPO (74% if the over-allotment is exercised). This means that Hart will be able to act in his own best interests rather than the company.Source: Shutterstock I realize that it doesn't make sense for someone to act against the best interests of a company they control because, ultimately, they might want to sell it. However, it happens more often than people realize. It's one thing to have a significant stake in a business, but when it's more than 50% of the outstanding shares, corporate governance often goes out the window.As an interesting aside, page 32 of the prospectus states that two subsidiaries of RGHL Group, which is owned by Graeme Hart, have defined benefit pension plans that are currently underfunded by $900 million. Should things go sideways with these pensions, Reynolds could find itself in the middle of a nasty lawsuit because it's a controlled company. * 7 Utility Stocks to Buy That Offer Juicy Dividends Now, the likelihood of this happening is remote, but it's something to consider when considering this slow-growth business, International Expansion Going Will Be ToughSource: Shutterstock Reynolds cooking and baking division generates a small amount of revenue outside the U.S. Here in Canada, where I live, it owns the Alcan brand of aluminum foil. It's very popular at Costco (NASDAQ:COST). Outside North America, it has the Diamond brand. In total, the company sells its wares in 54 different countries. However, it is the U.S. and Canada that account for 99% of its sales. It estimates that its addressable market outside North America is $7.2 billion. Based on $2.98 billion in 2018 annual sales, its international revenues were $298 million or just 4% of its estimated addressable market. While this seems like an obvious area of expansion for the company, it's important to remember that it participates in product categories that aren't exactly cutting edge or new to the world. Established brands outside North America aren't going to give up market share just because it says Reynolds or Hefty on the box. Whatever profitability Reynolds currently enjoys could partly disappear if it were to up spending outside North America. Therefore, I believe investors must view this opportunity as a double-edged sword. Be careful what you wish for because you just might get it. At the time of this writing Will Ashworth did not hold a position in any of the aforementioned securities. More From InvestorPlace * 2 Toxic Pot Stocks You Should Avoid * 7 Utility Stocks to Buy That Offer Juicy Dividends * 10 Gold and Silver Stocks to Profit Off 2020's Fear Trade * 3 Top Companies That Should Be More Careful With Your Data The post 7 Reasons Not to Buy Into the Hype Over Reynolds IPO appeared first on InvestorPlace.

  • PPD Inc. Raises $1.62 Billion in 2020’s Biggest U.S. IPO
    Bloomberg

    PPD Inc. Raises $1.62 Billion in 2020’s Biggest U.S. IPO

    (Bloomberg) -- Biotechnology and drug-research services firm PPD Inc. raised $1.62 billion in the biggest U.S. initial public offering so far this year.The company sold 60 million shares Wednesday for $27 each after marketing them $24 to $27. PPD is valued in the IPO at $9.16 billion based on the outstanding shares listed in its filings.Business-to-business firms such as PPD have tended to fare better in their IPOs and afterward than consumer-focused companies, including the herd of so-called unicorns that have gone public in the past year. The two most prominent of those once-private startups with valuations of $1 billion or more -- Uber Technologies Inc. and Lyft Inc. -- are still trading well below their offer prices.Casper Sleep Inc., which had a $1.1 billion valuation in a private funding round last year, is valued in its IPO Wednesday at only $476 million. The mattress retailer sold its shares at the bottom of a target range that it had lowered to $12 to $13 to raise about $100 million.PPD’s listing surpassed last week’s $1.23 billion offering by Reynolds Consumer Products Inc., making it the biggest IPO on a U.S. exchange this year.Like Reynolds, Wilmington, North Carolina-based PPD is profitable. For the nine months ended Sept. 30, PPD had revenue of $2.98 billion with net income of $34 million, according to its filings.During the past five years, PPD has conducted more than 2,100 clinical trials, and its laboratory scientists have completed more than 57,000 pharmaceutical development projects and worked with more than 7,600 compounds, according to its filings.The offering was led by Barclays Plc, JPMorgan Chase & Co., Morgan Stanley and Goldman Sachs Group Inc. Its shares are expected to begin trading Thursday on the Nasdaq Global Select Market under the symbol PPD.(Updates with company’s services in seventh paragraph. Casper Sleep’s valuation was corrected in an earlier version of this story.)To contact the reporter on this story: Michael Hytha in San Francisco at mhytha@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Liana Baker at lbaker75@bloomberg.net, Michael Hytha, Kara WetzelFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Casper’s Shrunken IPO Will Test Markets’ Appetite for Unprofitable Startups
    Bloomberg

    Casper’s Shrunken IPO Will Test Markets’ Appetite for Unprofitable Startups

    (Bloomberg) -- The year’s first fallen unicorn is about to test public markets’ appetite for unprofitable startups, and so far it’s not looking like a positive bellwether for the class of 2020.Mattress retailer Casper Sleep Inc. cut the price range Wednesday for its initial public offering, shrinking its potential market value to well below the $1.1 billion valuation it hit in a private funding round less than a year ago. It’s now aiming to sell shares for $12 to $13 each, down from the original range of $17 to $19.Questions about how private valuations for buzzy startups translate into public trading dogged 2019’s marquee listings, with the two most prominent debuts -- Uber Technologies Inc. and Lyft Inc. -- still trading well below their initial public offering prices. Meanwhile, the spectacular collapse of WeWork reads like a cautionary tale for money-losing unicorns headed for public markets.Speaking before Bloomberg reported that Casper was planning to slash its price range, the co-chair of law firm Cooley LLP’s global capital markets practice group said he was expecting a more subdued pipeline of wannabe public companies in 2020, and a less tumultuous ride for investors.“Last year, we saw some of the most interesting tech deals but not a great deal of stability in the post-market trading for other companies to want to emulate,” said David Peinsipp. “This year, I expect to see more consistency and stability, which I think will be a good sign for the market.”Casper, which counts Target Inc. and the chief executive officer of Canada Goose Holdings Inc. among its backers, echoed IPO pitches of the past by focusing prospective investors’ attention away from losses and onto its rapid revenue growth -- and the potential for more as it taps into the $432 billion “global sleep economy.” That may have been enough to spook those who’ve been burned by similar promises.“Investors continue to be very focused on companies with leadership position in big markets,” said Greg Chamberlain, head of U.S. technology, media and telecommunications equity capital markets at JPMorgan Chase & Co. “There’s an increased focus on detailing the path of profitability.”Five weeks into the year, markets have so far been kind to debutantes, with all but one of the six U.S. listings that raised more than $100 million trading above their IPO price, despite anxiety about the spreading coronavirus roiling equities in recent days. Of course, not all of the candidates fit the mold of the loss-making unicorn pumped up by private money.Reynolds Consumer Products Inc., the profitable maker of Reynolds Wrap aluminum foil and Hefty trash bags, last week raised $1.2 billion in the biggest U.S. IPO this year. Its shares closed Tuesday up almost 16% from their debut. That offering will likely be surpassed by PPD Inc., a biotechnology and pharmaceutical research services company -- also profitable -- that’s seeking to raise $1.62 billion in its IPO set for Wednesday.While Casper is taking the traditional route to tap public market investors, one trend market watchers are expecting is a flurry of companies considering direct listings instead of an IPO. The alternative route lets existing investors sell shares without being diluted, and without a lock-up period during which they can’t cash out. Even companies that aren’t likely to go public that way are asking about the process.“We’re certainly seeing the IPO process evolve,” JPMorgan’s Chamberlain said. “We’ll likely see increased transparency in the process, including the manner of communicating with public market investors and method of price discovery.”Companies could also rush to market in the first half of the year to avoid coinciding with the U.S. Presidential election in November. Listings often tend to trail off around the Thanksgiving holiday, but the effect could be particularly stark this year.“Subject to the market’s view on the impact of the 2020 election, IPOs are likely to be front loaded with the majority pricing before July or August,” said Colin Stewart, global head of technology capital markets at Morgan Stanley.Over 180 companies went public on U.S. exchanges last year, raising more than $51 billion combined, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. Here are some of the ones we’re watching in 2020.AirbnbWhile Airbnb Inc. isn’t expected to pursue a traditional IPO, the 12-year-old home-rental company is still likely to be the most high-profile listing this year.The profitable company, last valued at $31 billion in a 2017 private funding round, is planning a direct listing where it won’t raise new capital, people familiar with the matter have said. Airbnb Inc. previously said it plans to be publicly traded during 2020.Other Direct ListingsInvestors expect one to four direct listings this year, compared to just one -- Slack Technologies Inc. -- last year, according to a survey conducted by Deutsche Bank AG. Work management platform Asana Inc. filed on Monday for a direct listing. Food-delivery service Doordash Inc. and software development and information-technology operations GitLab Inc. are also among firms considering the alternative method.“Almost every company is asking about direct listing today,” said Jackie Kelley, Americas IPO Leader at Ernst & Young.Venture capital firms as well as Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley each held events last year to promote the listing option. The New York Stock Exchange and Nasdaq have submitted bids to the Securities and Exchange Commission to let companies raise primary capital during a direct listing.FoodIf 2019 was the year of the ride-hailing IPO, 2020 could be the year that the food-delivery industry gets shaken up. The only U.S. listed player, Grubhub Inc., has denied reports that it is for sale while Postmates Inc. has been sitting on its confidential IPO filing since last February. Alongside Uber Eats and Doordash, betting on the winner is no easy task.Olo, which powers the back-end software for some of these delivery services, reached out to potential advisers late last year for an IPO that could value it at about $1 billion, Bloomberg reported. The company, whose name is derived from “online ordering,” counts Shake Shack Inc. founder Danny Meyer and Tiger Global Management among its investors.JAB Holding Co., meanwhile, is working with banks on the planned IPO of its coffee empire, which includes brands such as Caribou Coffee and Peet’s, people with knowledge of the matter have said.Sports and FitnessDallas, Texas-based Topgolf International Inc., an operator of golf-themed driving ranges, tapped Morgan Stanley, JPMorgan and Bank of America Corp. for an IPO that could raise about $1 billion, people familiar with the matter have said. The company, backed by Providence Equity Partners and Callaway Golf Co., is seeking a valuation of $4 billion. Group workout company F45 Training -- backed by actor Mark Wahlberg, and boutique fitness franchise owner Xponential Fitness LLC are both planning listings.FashionDebt-laden retailer J. Crew Group Inc.’s plan to spin off its denim unit Chinos Holdings Inc., branded as Madewell, could happen later this year. The deal would help the parent raise capital amid a heavy debt load, which stands at almost $2.5 billion.Premium shoe brand Cole Haan Inc., acquired in 2013 by private equity firm Apax Partners from Nike Inc., filed for an IPO confidentially in October.CybersecuritySanta Clara, California-based cybersecurity firm McAfee Inc. has hired Morgan Stanley and Bank of America Corp. as well as a full banking syndicate for an IPO, people familiar with the matter said last year. The listing would be return to public markets for McAfee, which was taken private by Intel Corp. in 2010 in a $7.7 billion buyout. Private equity firms TPG and Thoma Bravo later took stakes.Enterprise SoftwareSoftware companies, including Zoom Video Communication Inc. and Datadog Inc., posted a post-IPO gain of 41% on a year-to-date weighted average basis, compared to an average of 20.8% across industries, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. The enthusiasm has encouraged a roster of similar companies to follow suit.Procore Technologies Inc. is working with Goldman Sachs on a listing that could value the construction-management software maker at more than $4 billion, while JFrog Inc. has tapped Morgan Stanley and JPMorgan for an IPO. Jamf Software LLC, which makes tools for enterprises to manage Apple Inc. devices, has filed confidentially and could be valued at about $3 billion in a listing.“Some of the software companies that went public five years ago have matured, and investors are looking for the next wave of enterprise software companies and rewarding them with higher multiples,” said Justin Smolkin, Deutsche Bank’s head of technology, media and telecommunications equity capital markets.(Updates with Casper’s confirmation of lower price range in second paragraph)To contact the reporters on this story: Elizabeth Fournier in New York at efournier5@bloomberg.net;Crystal Tse in New York at ctse44@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Aaron Kirchfeld at akirchfeld@bloomberg.net, ;Liana Baker at lbaker75@bloomberg.net, Elizabeth Fournier, Michael HythaFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Reynolds Wrap Maker Jumps After Raising $1.2 Billion in IPO
    Bloomberg

    Reynolds Wrap Maker Jumps After Raising $1.2 Billion in IPO

    (Bloomberg) -- Reynolds Consumer Products Inc., the maker of Reynolds Wrap aluminum foil and Hefty trash bags, rose 9.8% in its trading debut after raising $1.23 billion in the biggest initial public offering by a household goods maker.Reynolds, backed by New Zealand billionaire Graeme Hart’s Rank Group, sold 47.17 million shares for $26 each Thursday after marketing them for $25 to $28. The company’s shares closed trading Friday at $28.55, giving the company a market value of $5.78 billion.The offering is the first billion-dollar U.S. listing of the year, as well as an unusual debut for a household goods maker. The IPO is the largest ever by a company in that niche, topping the 2014 Brussels listing by soap maker Ontex Group NV that raised 596 million euros ($661 million) including the so-called greenshoe shares, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.“What’s attractive to investors about our company is steady proven growth over a long period of time,” Reynolds Chief Executive Officer Lance Mitchell said in an interview. “We have a very consistent, durable demand and investment thesis that’s compelling.”The Reynolds listing is the biggest test so far this year of investor interest. 1Life Healthcare Inc., a provider of tech-driven primary care clinics under the One Medical brand, rose 58% in its trading debut Friday after pricing its shares at the bottom of a marketed range to raise $245 million.Next week, drug and biotech research services provider PPD Inc. is seeking to raise as much as $1.62 billion in its IPO. Casper Sleep Inc., one of the leading brands in the so-called bed-in-a-box industry, also plans to go public, with a goal of raising $159 million.The offerings follow last year’s tech-related IPO surge, led by Uber Technologies Inc.’s $8.1 billion offering, that gave way to a largely disappointing second half.Peloton, WeWorkPeloton Interactive Inc. dropped in its trading debut in September, the same month as WeWork’s share-sale plans were officially withdrawn after its spectacular flop. In November, Canadian waste management firm GFL Environmental Inc. canceled an IPO that targeted as much as $2.1 billion.Reynolds, based in Lake Forest, Illinois, was formed by Rank Group in 2010, primarily through a consolidation of the earlier Reynolds and Hefty businesses with Presto brands. Unlike many of the so-called unicorns that went public last year, Reynolds is profitable. For the nine months ended Sept. 30, it had net income of $135 million on revenue of $2.1 billion, according to its filings.The company’s products are used in 95% of U.S. households, according to its filings. Hefty trash bags and related wares accounted for about 39% of its sales in 2018, followed closely by cookware goods including Reynolds foil, which was first sold in 1947 and has 64% of the U.S. market share. Hefty tableware, including disposable cups and cutlery, made up the remaining 24% of revenue.Efficiency, InnovationReynolds said it plans to grow through improved operational efficiency and through innovation, aiming to generate 20% of its revenue each year from products introduced within the previous three years. The company is also focusing on goods made with recycled, renewable, recyclable and compostable materials, according to its filings.Reynolds will be controlled by PFL, a subsidiary of a company wholly owned by Hart, according to the company’s filings. PFL will have 77% of the voting rights of Reynolds, which plans to use some of the IPO proceeds to repay debt and for general corporate purposes.The offering was led by Credit Suisse Group AG, Goldman Sachs Group Inc. and JPMorgan Chase & Co. The shares are trading on the Nasdaq Global Select Market under the symbol REYN.(Updates with CEO’s comments in fourth paragraph)\--With assistance from Crystal Tse and Gerald Porter Jr..To contact the reporter on this story: Michael Hytha in San Francisco at mhytha@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Liana Baker at lbaker75@bloomberg.net, Michael Hytha, Matthew MonksFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Business Wire

    Reynolds Consumer Products Inc. Announces Pricing of Initial Public Offering

    Reynolds Consumer Products Inc. ("RCP" or the "Company") today announced the pricing of the initial public offering of 47,170,000 shares of its common stock at a price to the public of $26.00 per share. In addition, the Company granted the underwriters a 30-day option to purchase up to 7,075,500 additional shares of common stock at the public offering price, less underwriting discounts and commissions. The shares of common stock are expected to begin trading on the Nasdaq Global Select Market on January 31, 2020 under the ticker symbol "REYN." The offering is expected to close on February 4, 2020, subject to customary closing conditions.

  • Bloomberg

    Black Diamond Therapeutics Doubles After $201 Million IPO

    (Bloomberg) -- Black Diamond Therapeutics Inc. more than doubled in its trading debut after raising $201 million in an initial public offering that exceeded its goals.Shares of the oncology therapy developer finished their first day of trading up 108% from the offer price of $19. They closed in New York trading Thursday at $39.48, giving the company a market value of $1.3 billion.The company, based in Cambridge, Massachusetts, sold 10.6 million shares Wednesday after earlier marketing 8.9 million for $16 to $18.The listing is -- at least for a few hours -- the largest in the U.S. so far this year. Reynolds Consumer Products Inc. is set to sell its shares later Thursday to raise as much as $1.32 billion.Black Diamond Therapeutics said in its filings that it plans to use the IPO proceeds to develop its BDTX-189 cancer medicine, with a combined phase 1/2 clinical trial starting in the first half of the year.The company’s largest investor is Versant Ventures, according to the filings.The offering was led by JPMorgan Chase & Co., Jefferies Financial Group Inc. and Cowen Inc. The shares are trading on the Nasdaq Global Select Market under the symbol BDTX.(Updates with closing share price in second paragraph)To contact the reporter on this story: Michael Hytha in San Francisco at mhytha@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Liana Baker at lbaker75@bloomberg.net, Michael HythaFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.