RMS.PA - Hermes International Societe en commandite par actions

Paris - Paris Delayed Price. Currency in EUR
747.80
+1.20 (+0.16%)
At close: 5:35PM CEST
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Performance Outlook
  • Short Term
    2W - 6W
  • Mid Term
    6W - 9M
  • Long Term
    9M+
Previous Close746.60
Open743.40
Bid0.00 x 0
Ask0.00 x 0
Day's Range727.60 - 751.60
52 Week Range516.00 - 751.60
Volume127,473
Avg. Volume83,312
Market Cap77.91B
Beta (5Y Monthly)0.56
PE Ratio (TTM)51.40
EPS (TTM)14.55
Earnings DateFeb 26, 2020
Forward Dividend & Yield4.55 (0.61%)
Ex-Dividend DateApr 28, 2020
1y Target Est498.46
Fair Value is the appropriate price for the shares of a company, based on its earnings and growth rate also interpreted as when P/E Ratio = Growth Rate. Estimated return represents the projected annual return you might expect after purchasing shares in the company and holding them over the default time horizon of 5 years, based on the EPS growth rate that we have projected.
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    • Is Hermès International Société en commandite par actions (EPA:RMS) Using Too Much Debt?
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      Hermès International : Shares and voting rights as of 30th April 2020

      HERMES INTERNATIONAL Société en Commandite par Actions with a capital of 53 840 400,12 € euros, Incorporated under the n° 572 076 396 RCS PARIS Whose registered office is.

    • Reuters

      Global luxury gloom to deepen despite easing lockdowns -Bain

      Global sales of luxury goods are expected to slump by 50% to 60% in the second quarter even as some countries begin to ease coronavirus lockdowns and despite signs of recovery in the Chinese market, consultancy Bain said on Thursday. The coronavirus crisis, which first hit China late last year before spreading to Europe and the United States, has kept shoppers at home and forced retailers to shut stores, resulting in a crushing halt to a decade of spectacular growth for high-end brands. With the April to June decline coming on top of an estimated 25% drop in the first three months of the year, Bain expects global sales of luxury handbags, clothing and cosmetics to shrink by between 20% and 35% in 2020, against a previous estimate for a 15% to 35% decline.

    • Coronavirus Will Change Not Just How, But What, We Buy
      Bloomberg

      Coronavirus Will Change Not Just How, But What, We Buy

      (Bloomberg Opinion) -- As the coronavirus pandemic continues, Bloomberg Opinion will be running a series of features by our columnists that consider the long-term consequences of the crisis. This column is part of a package envisioning a new consumer economy. For more, see Mary Duenwald on technology changing how we shop and on how consumers respond to crises, and Tara Lachapelle on fixing the broken business model of streaming.During the coronavirus lockdown, a particular meme has been doing the rounds on Instagram and Twitter.It shows a woman in a pink ballgown, complete with tulle train billowing out behind her. She’s not reaching for a cocktail or standing on a glitzy red carpet. She is in a supermarket produce section, clutching a bunch of carrots in one hand and reaching for a red pepper with the other.The image encapsulates how some consumers feel: After being cooped up at home for months, they can’t wait to finally have an opportunity to get all dressed up again.But for many others, what they wear, how they shop and which products they buy will be forever altered by the pandemic. The Covid-19 outbreak, which has tragically infected more than three million people and killed more than 219,000, has also struck at the heart of consumerism around the world.With a quarter of a million stores closed across the U.S. at the height of the lockdown, according to research group GlobalData, the ability to purchase, long a symbol of affluence and status, is in peril. Never has materialism seemed so emasculated.First of all, there’s the immediate economic impact. With millions of workers temporarily furloughed and laid off, they will be reining in their spending. If these become permanent job losses, the effect will be even more severe. Conspicuous consumption is going to look ugly for a while.And habits learned in lean times often stick around. Witness the acceptance of discount retailers, such as the German no-frills supermarkets Aldi and Lidl. The cash-strapped middle classes in the U.S. and Europe discovered the delights of their cheap wine and value toilet paper during the 2007-2008 global financial crisis, and the budget grocers have prospered ever since.Then there’s the slow and incremental process of coming out of lockdown. Even individuals who have kept their jobs and full salaries may make longer-term changes to their spending, as it will be some time before they feel comfortable visiting crowded malls and dining out in restaurants again.With social distancing potentially staying in place for up to two years, according to KPMG, this could mean far-reaching consequences for the operation and physical design of stores. For example, stores might have to require appointments for visits, offer more check-out free locations and even rethink facilities such as changing rooms. Who wants to pick up discarded garments when the world is emerging from a pandemic?So far, there are some encouraging signs coming from China, where consumers emerging from lockdown seem to be embracing shopping once more. PwC estimates that as of early April sales at non-food retailers were at 50-80% of their pre-crisis levels. In luxury, the recovery has been even more extreme: A Hermes International flagship store took in $2.7 million when it reopened in Guangzhou in mid-April, believed to be a record daily haul for a boutique in China, according to fashion trade bible WWD. LVMH said some of its big brands on the mainland had seen 50% increases in sales in April compared to the previous year.This phenomenon is being called “revenge spending,” a phrase first coined to capture the desire for consumer goods unleashed in China during the 1980s, after the poverty and chaos of the Cultural Revolution. At the moment, Chinese shoppers are flush with cash after cancelled travel and events. However, this demand may not last, especially as the number of people allowed in boutiques at any one time is limited and initiatives such as temperature testing have been put in place.The bigger impact of this crisis, then, may be a shift in what consumers choose to buy.*****The outbreak has hit something we largely take for granted: our health. While more government resources are directed to healthcare — something that will have implications for taxes and disposable incomes — there will also likely be a reassessment of personal priorities. That could mean spending even more of one’s income on private health insurance or buying products that help boost immunity.Wellness had already become one of the few rich seams for consumer groups, giving rise to Beyond Meat Inc.’s plant protein burgers, South Korean gold-laced face masks and vitamin infusions sold in upmarket department stores. Despite criticisms that so-called self-care is the expensive preserve of millennial hipsters, society’s desire to ensure it doesn’t get sick will likely turbo-charge demand for these products.The pandemic has also fostered a renewed sense of community. This plus the inability to travel very far could encourage spending in more local shops and on brands with strong regional identities, as opposed to the big retailers who may have had empty shelves or struggled to deliver online orders during the crisis. Underlining the new mood, one British retailer with a long history of trading on the high street told me they’ve even noticed more customers saying thank you to staff in their daily interactions.  One sector that is poised to suffer tremendously going forward is clothing. Most consumers have effectively skipped a fashion season, being unwilling or unable to buy apparel for spring and summer. Conferences, parties and weddings have been cancelled, so we’ve simply needed fewer new clothes. There may be some pent-up demand when consumers rediscover their freedom, especially if retailers are having to cut prices to clear stock. But for many, essential grooming such as getting a haircut or a fresh set of eyelash extensions will take precedence over buying a new outfit.Some consumers who bought fewer clothes during this period may continue to reduce their wardrobe spend. The size of the average U.S. closet has already shrunk over the past three years, according to GlobalData. If you combine the pandemic and concerns about fashion’s environmental cost, it’s not hard to see how men and women may buy even less apparel in the future.During the prolonged shutdown, there will be some retailers that consumers simply don’t miss and therefore may not return to. U.S. department stores, such as Macy’s Inc. and J.C. Penney, already grappling with the shift toward online buying and with few compelling products, may well fall into this category. J.C. Penney skipped a $12 million interest payment and is evaluating alternatives including a potential bankruptcy filing to restructure its finances, Reuters reported recently. Macy’s, meanwhile, is exploring ways to use its real estate to secure fresh cash. Indeed, some storied names may shut their doors forever, or decide that the time is right to close a number of locations.  How brands behave when the chips are down will also determine how customers react to them when they come out of lockdown.Some have acted particularly well, adapting their offerings to meet changing needs. For example, luxury goods groups, including LVMH, Kering SA, Prada SpA, Burberry Group Plc and Ralph Lauren Corp, repurposed their facilities to produce protective equipment such as hand sanitizer, masks and gowns. Brands like Nike and Lululemon have engaged shoppers with online workouts; while British clothing and food retailer Marks & Spencer Group Plc. has offered meditation sessions. This nimbleness won’t be forgotten.*****Whether out of necessity or choice, shoppers will want goods that are appealing — and, after a health scare, make them feel good — but are priced at a level they believe is appropriate. This doesn’t always mean the cheapest, but it does mean a perceived sense of good value for money. That’s at odds with the approach of higher initial prices followed by steep markdowns that has become a hallmark of much U.S. retail. But as customers become more discerning, store groups will need to distinguish themselves with more than just discounts.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Andrea Felsted is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the consumer and retail industries. She previously worked at the Financial Times.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

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      Hermès International: 1st quarter 2020 sales

      After a highly dynamic month in January across all the geographical areas worldwide, the beginning of 2020 is marked by a health crisis of an unprecedented scale, duration and geographic extent. After hitting China, it spread and gained in intensity in Europe, America and Asia at the end of the first quarter, leading to the temporary closure of the stores in compliance with the various governmental directives, and the stoppage of the production sites in France and Europe to protect all the employees. Facing this health crisis, Hermès demonstrates support and responsibility.

    • Revenge Is a Dish That's Off the China Menu
      Bloomberg

      Revenge Is a Dish That's Off the China Menu

      (Bloomberg Opinion) -- China’s high-end consumers aren’t going on a “revenge spending” spree. They’re just bringing their love affair with luxury brands home. A surge in China sales for stores operated by the likes of LVMH and Hermes International has spurred optimism that consumer demand will snap back as the lockdowns lift. The reports offered a glimmer of light amid data showing that China’s retail sales plunged 15.8% in March from a year earlier.Unfortunately, it looks as though Chinese consumers are simply buying their alligator handbags and diamond watches at home instead of in Hong Kong, Paris or Milan. While travel restrictions aimed at halting the pandemic are partly responsible, the trend was already in place before the virus appeared — driven by a change in tax rates.Beijing has been encouraging the nation’s shoppers, who accounted for around a third of global luxury sales last year, to spend more money at home. The gap between prices of upscale goods onshore and overseas shrank to 15% last year from about 30% three years ago after a series of cuts to China’s luxury sales taxes. Protests last year in Hong Kong, a favorite pit-stop for buyers of high-end products, also helped to spur domestic sales. The migration still has a long way to run: Only 30% of China’s luxury purchases took place at home last year.All this suggests that this spurt in luxury sales is unlikely to be sustained at these levels. Chinese purchases won’t rescue the sector globally, as my colleague Andrea Felsted has noted. More than 90% of sales take place in bricks-and-mortar stores. That’s understandable: If you’re going to spend thousands of dollars on a handcrafted item, you’ll want to touch it, rather than just clicking a button on an e-commerce site. Besides, Chinese shoppers are still worried about their jobs and the prospect of salary cuts. Most people don’t plan to increase spending on high-end goods, according to a Morgan Stanley survey that suggests the uptick reported by LVMH, Hermes and L’Oreal SA may quickly fade. Of 2,000 consumers surveyed, 29% said they will spend less on luxury goods next month versus this month, while 40% said they would spend more on groceries. The survey covered city-dwellers aged 18 to 49 in 19 provinces.The luxury sales bounce will taper off into a gradual though sustainable rise, according to Lucia Li, a Beijing-based partner at Bain & Co. The consultancy divided Chinese consumer products into six categories ranked from those that will gain a permanent boost from the coronavirus, such as digital healthcare, to those that will face enduring headwinds such as traditional retailers. It placed luxury goods in the middle bracket, along with alcohol and household appliances.China will need to look elsewhere for its economic revival. This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Nisha Gopalan is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering deals and banking. She previously worked for the Wall Street Journal and Dow Jones as an editor and a reporter.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

    • For Luxury Brands, It’s Too Early to Pop Open the Champagne
      Bloomberg

      For Luxury Brands, It’s Too Early to Pop Open the Champagne

      (Bloomberg Opinion) -- A flagship Hermes International store in Guangzhou reportedly took in $2.7 million on its first day reopening after the coronavirus lockdown, the biggest daily haul for a boutique in China, according to fashion trade bible WWD.The French luxury brand best known for its Kelly and Birkin bags may not be alone in enjoying the phenomenon that has been referred to as “revenge spending.” The term, coined to describe pent-up consumer demand in the 1980s after the poverty and chaos of the Cultural Revolution, is now being applied to splurging by Chinese shoppers as the virus recedes.LVMH, hit by a 17% decline in first-quarter sales excluding currency movements and acquisitions, said late Thursday that Chinese consumers were once again enthusiastically embracing its brands, including Louis Vuitton and Christian Dior. And my Bloomberg News colleagues reported that sales at LVMH stores on the mainland were up 50% year-on-year in the past three weeks.Cosmetics maker L’Oreal SA also pointed to a recovery in the region’s demand for beauty products. Of course, that may be a function of what’s called the “lipstick” index, where when times are tough consumers tend to buy smaller treats rather than more expensive items. But the signs do bode well for demand from Chinese consumers, who could account for 44% of luxury spending this year, according to analysts at Jefferies.Still, none of this may be enough to rescue second-quarter trading, nor the full year.First of all, there’s no guarantee that the rebound will be sustained. What’s more, during normal times the Chinese make the majority of their vanity purchases when they travel abroad. In this new post-coronavirus era, there has been an initial trend toward more domestic spending, and that could accelerate further. But bigger impulse purchases are still more likely to happen when people can finally visit cities such as Paris or Milan. With airplanes still grounded in many places and borders closed, travel is set to be severely constrained for some time, and that will be a drag on industry growth.Meanwhile, stores in Europe and the U.S. remain closed. When they finally reopen, brands will find it very difficult to compensate for fewer Chinese visitors. Massive job losses and all of the other economic hardships brought by lockdowns means they won’t be able to count on local shoppers to make up the difference. Consultants Bain & Co. estimate that global personal luxury goods sales could fall as much as 35% this year, with a mid-point scenario at 22-25%. This would be the worst decline in modern luxury industry history.Despite the inevitable industry downturn this year — one that will possibly stretch into 2021 — LVMH looks to be one of the best-placed luxury groups.With revenue of 52 billion euros ($56 billion) in 2019, more than three times that of its nearest rivals, LVMH has significant scale and a strong stable of brands, led by Louis Vuitton and Dior but also including Fendi and Celine in fashion and the Sephora beauty stores. The 10% decline in fashion and leather goods sales, excluding currency movements and acquisitions, is better than might have been expected. The company run by billionaire Bernard Arnault also has a diverse portfolio, both geographically and in terms of products, which include spirits and beauty lines too. This gives it scope to cut costs, but also, crucially, to invest when competitors may be weakened.There are some worries. For example, the $16 billion acquisition of American diamond-jewelry icon Tiffany & Co. will now be more of a challenge. (LVMH indicated on Thursday that it would still go ahead with the deal.) And it also has exposure to travel retail through major duty-free chain DFS, which may be depressed for some time.So LVMH won’t be immune from the continued disruption to luxury goods sales. But as it demonstrated in the first quarter it should be more than able to hold its own.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of Bloomberg LP and its owners.Andrea Felsted is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering the consumer and retail industries. She previously worked at the Financial Times.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

    • GlobeNewswire

      Hermès International : Shares and voting rights as of 31st March 2020

      HERMES INTERNATIONAL Société en Commandite par Actions with a capital of 53 840 400,12 € euros, Incorporated under the n° 572 076 396 RCS PARIS Whose registered office is.

    • Hermès International Société en commandite par actions (EPA:RMS) Shareholders Have Enjoyed A 89% Share Price Gain
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    • GlobeNewswire

      Availability of the 2019 Universal Registration Document

      HERMES INTERNATIONAL Société en Commandite par Actions with a capital of 53 840 400,12 € euros, Incorporated under the n° 572 076 396 RCS PARIS Whose registered office is.

    • Thomson Reuters StreetEvents

      Edited Transcript of RMS.PA earnings conference call or presentation 26-Feb-20 8:00am GMT

      Full Year 2019 Hermes International SCA Earnings Presentation

    • Here's Why I Think Hermès International Société en commandite par actions (EPA:RMS) Is An Interesting Stock
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    • GlobeNewswire

      Hermès International : Shares and voting rights as of 29th February 2020

      HERMES INTERNATIONAL Société en Commandite par Actions with a capital of 53 840 400,12 € euros, Incorporated under the n° 572 076 396 RCS PARIS Whose registered office is.

    • GlobeNewswire

      Hermes International : Press release 2020 on the compensation of executive chairmen

      26.1) HERMES INTERNATIONAL discloses information on all elements, acquired or deferred, of its Executive Chairmen compensation, immediately following the Board meeting having established these elements. Article 17 of the Articles of Association provides that each Executive Chairman shall be entitled to receive a statutory compensation, and possibly an additional compensation, the maximum amount of which is determined by the Shareholders’ Ordinary General Meeting with the unanimous approval of the active partners. The active partner determines each year the effective compensation of each of the Executive Chairmen within the limits of these ceilings.

    • GlobeNewswire

      Hermès International: 2019 Results

      HERMÈS Exceptional sales and results growth in 2019Revenue increased by 15% at current exchange rates and by 12% at constant rates The recurring operating income1, up 13%,.

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      Hermès International : Shares and voting rights as of 31th January 2020

      HERMES INTERNATIONAL Société en Commandite par Actions with a capital of 53 840 400,12 € euros, Incorporated under the n° 572 076 396 RCS PARIS Whose registered office is.

    • GlobeNewswire

      hHERMES INTERNATIONAL : PRESS RELEASE

      Hermès, a house of objects since 1837, presents its sixteenth métier, Beauty, with its first collection, Rouge Hermès, devoted to the beauty of the lips. Hermès Beauty is part of who we are: a house where everything comes from creation, driven by artisans who seek to accompany the men and women of today with elegance, and with the integrity and authenticity that we represent. The fruit of design, research and development work initiated more than five years ago and directed by Agnès de Villers, CEO of Hermès Perfume & Beauty, in the spirit of excellence and the integration of know-how that characterises Hermès, Hermès Beauty is a collaborative creation under the aegis of Pierre-Alexis Dumas, artistic director of Hermès.

    • Reuters

      European shares slump as coronavirus fears worsen

      European shares dropped sharply in early trading on Monday as growing concerns over the potential economic damage from a fast-spreading coronavirus sapped demand for riskier assets. Death toll from the outbreak in China rose to 81 and the virus spread to more than 10 countries including France, Japan and the United States. Some health experts questioned whether China can contain the epidemic.

    • GlobeNewswire

      Hermes International : Situation of the liquidity contract as of 31 december 2019

      HERMES INTERNATIONAL                                                                                                                       January 24, 2020 Half yearly.

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