ROG.VX - ROCHE GS

Swiss - Swiss Delayed Price. Currency in CHF
274.00
+0.15 (+0.05%)
At close: 5:35PM CEST
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous Close273.85
Open274.60
Bid288.25 x 0
Ask247.05 x 0
Day's Range272.25 - 275.00
52 Week Range272.25 - 275.00
Volume837,971
Avg. VolumeN/A
Market CapN/A
Beta (3Y Monthly)N/A
PE Ratio (TTM)N/A
EPS (TTM)N/A
Earnings DateJul 26, 2018
Forward Dividend & YieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-Dividend DateN/A
1y Target EstN/A
  • Judith McKenna discusses Walmart's international business, global perception, weighs in on trade disputes
    Yahoo Finance Video

    Judith McKenna discusses Walmart's international business, global perception, weighs in on trade disputes

    Walmart International President and CEO Judith McKenna speaks with Yahoo Finance's Julia La Roche ahead of the Walmart Shareholders Meeting.

  • Greg Foran discusses Walmart's growing e-commerce presence, and his upbeat perspective for future of brick and mortar stores
    Yahoo Finance Video

    Greg Foran discusses Walmart's growing e-commerce presence, and his upbeat perspective for future of brick and mortar stores

    Walmart U.S. President and CEO Greg Foran speaks with Yahoo Finance's Julia La Roche ahead of the Walmart Shareholders Meeting.

  • How much would it take for you to go a month without your smartphone?
    Yahoo Finance Video

    How much would it take for you to go a month without your smartphone?

    According to a JP Morgan study, some wealthy people are saying that it would take them at least $100,000 to give up their smartphones for just a month. Yahoo Finance’s Julia La Roche, Dan Roberts, Myles Udland, and Melody Hahm discuss these results.

  • Jim Breyer on investing in artificial intelligence
    Yahoo Finance Video

    Jim Breyer on investing in artificial intelligence

    Venture capitalist Jim Breyer, the CEO of Breyer Capital, speaks with Yahoo Finance's Julia La Roche about investing in artificial intelligence.

  • Nassim Nicholas Taleb on 'black swans'
    Yahoo Finance Video

    Nassim Nicholas Taleb on 'black swans'

    Nassim Nicholas Taleb, the best-selling author of "The Black Swan," speaks to Yahoo Finance's Julia La Roche at the 2019 SALT Conference in Las Vegas.

  • Maria Menounos on the future of entertainment TV
    Yahoo Finance Video

    Maria Menounos on the future of entertainment TV

    Award-winning entertainment reporter Maria Menounos talks to Yahoo Finance's Julia La Roche about the future of entertainment television.

  • Walmart beats on earnings, posts best Q1 comp sales in 9 years
    Yahoo Finance Video

    Walmart beats on earnings, posts best Q1 comp sales in 9 years

    Walmart is out with its quarterly earnings, beating expectations. Yahoo Finance’s Alexis Christoforous, Brian Sozzi, and Julia La Roche discuss.

  • Walmart rolling out next-day shipping to compete with Amazon
    Yahoo Finance Video

    Walmart rolling out next-day shipping to compete with Amazon

    Walmart announces next-day shipping for nearly 200,000 products. It's rolling out in Phoenix, Las Vegas and Southern California first. Yahoo Finance's Julia La Roche and Seana Smith discuss.

  • Tencent Music stock plummets on revenue growth miss and executive shakeup
    Yahoo Finance Video

    Tencent Music stock plummets on revenue growth miss and executive shakeup

    China's leading streaming music provider beat Wall St's estimate on earnings, but revenue growth of 39% fell short of expectations. Plus an executive shakeup is worrying investors. Meanwhile, investors watching closely at Alibaba's earnings out tomorrow. Yahoo Finance's Julia La Roche joins Seana Smith.

  • Walmart rolls out free next-day delivery service
    Yahoo Finance Video

    Walmart rolls out free next-day delivery service

    Walmart is ramping up its competition against Amazon, and announced that it’s debuting a one-day delivery service in select markets. Yahoo Finance’s Alexis Christoforous, Brian Sozzi, Julia La Roche break down the details.

  • Things Are Looking Pretty Bad When Even Coffee Demand Is at Risk
    Bloomberg

    Things Are Looking Pretty Bad When Even Coffee Demand Is at Risk

    (Bloomberg) -- It’s a really tough time to be a coffee producer. Prices are dismal, Brazil’s massive crops are adding to global oversupply and small-time growers in Central America are fleeing the industry. Now, the economic malaise that’s sending distress signals across financial markets is adding yet another blow to this already fragile commodity.It can be hard to believe that the economic outlook plays a big role in coffee demand, given that caffeine addicts can usually get their fixes relatively cheaply. But while most people won’t forgo their morning jolt to start the day, it’s the extra cup or two that can feel like a luxury and end up being cut when it’s time to tighten belts.“The demand outlook isn’t very promising,” said Hernando de la Roche, a senior vice president at INTL FCStone in Miami, who has traded coffee more than three decades. “In general, a recession would reduce demand for coffee, especially at the coffee shops. People who used to drink one or two cups in the morning at home, and then maybe one cup outside, will probably skip the last one.”That’s bad news for a market that’s already reeling.Prices for arabica beans, the smooth variety favored by companies like Starbucks Corp., are down almost 10% in the past year and in May touched the lowest since 2005. Last week, the International Coffee Organization raised its surplus forecast for the global market, which also includes robusta beans. Olam International Ltd., one of the largest java traders in Asia, on Wednesday blamed lower coffee prices and sales for a drop in revenue at its confectionery and beverage unit.The rout has hit producers hard, especially in countries with higher costs such as Honduras, El Salvador and Guatemala. Competition has gotten so fierce, and prices so low, that coffee farming has become untenable for many small growers -- leading their adult children to shun the business.Gourmet Coffee’s Popularity Soars While Growers Are in CrisisMeanwhile in Brazil, the world’s top coffee grower and exporter, output has accelerated in recent years with highly mechanized production, and there’s no sign that trend is slowing down. The depreciation of Brazil’s real has also encouraged exports from the country. Shippers are ready to sell at an opportunity given the concerns over demand. In Colombia, the No. 2 arabica producer, the peso is also weaker against the dollar. Coffee cargoes are usually priced in the U.S. currency.“With the volatility created by the trade war, people will become more cautious,” de la Roche said.To contact the reporter on this story: Marvin G. Perez in New York at mperez71@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: James Attwood at jattwood3@bloomberg.net, Millie MunshiFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Is Roche Holding AG's (VTX:ROG) 40% ROE Better Than Average?
    Simply Wall St.

    Is Roche Holding AG's (VTX:ROG) 40% ROE Better Than Average?

    Many investors are still learning about the various metrics that can be useful when analysing a stock. This article is...

  • Thomson Reuters StreetEvents

    Edited Transcript of ROG.VX earnings conference call or presentation 25-Jul-19 11:00am GMT

    Half Year 2019 Roche Holding AG Earnings Call

  • Do Roche Holding's (VTX:ROG) Earnings Warrant Your Attention?
    Simply Wall St.

    Do Roche Holding's (VTX:ROG) Earnings Warrant Your Attention?

    It's only natural that many investors, especially those who are new to the game, prefer to buy shares in 'sexy' stocks...

  • Gilead Risks Regrets on Pricey Galapagos Partnership
    Bloomberg

    Gilead Risks Regrets on Pricey Galapagos Partnership

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- Gilead Sciences Inc.’s new CEO Daniel O'Day is trying to replicate the successful playbook of his former employer Roche Holding AG, the Swiss pharma giant he worked at for more than 30 years. On Sunday, Gilead announced that it would invest $5.1 billion to deepen an existing relationship with Belgian biotechnology firm Galapagos NV. O'Day isn't just committing to Galapagos – he’s committing to the idea of research partnerships that stop short of outright M&A. The deal includes a 10-year standstill agreement that restricts Gilead's ability to acquire the company. O'Day thinks that leaving Galapagos independent will keep it innovative, a bet that paid off for Roche and its productive long-term partnerships with Genentech and Chugai Pharmaceutical Co. That nebulous benefit will have to come through in a big way to justify the price and structure of this deal.  Gilead is paying $3.4 billion upfront to gain rights to six drugs in clinical trials and access to a suite of earlier-stage programs. It is also making a $1.1 billion equity investment in Galapagos.The total outlay is a scant $2 billion less than the market cap of Galapagos before the deal was announced, and is above what the company was worth as recently as March.  On top of that, Gilead already owned 12 percent of Galapagos and rights to potential blockbuster arthritis drug filgotinib from a $725 million deal completed in 2015. O'Day also isn't done paying up. He will have to shell out more cash to opt in to future programs and for development costs. Gilead will also pay a significant sales royalty if any drugs are approved. And Galapagos will retain European rights for most of its medicines. The potential return of this deal is lower than an outright acquisition, and Gilead didn't seem to get much of a discount. It’s giving up a lot to limit its risk and test the abstract notion that partnerships are superior. The company's late-stage pipeline is sparse, and it is too reliant on its HIV franchise. It’s not in a position to leave upside on the table. There’s a chance that the deal could work out. Gilead’s only has to pay $150 million to gain exposure to programs that are currently in early stages; that could wind up being a relative steal at some point in the next decade. Investors may feel a twinge with every opt-in and royalty check, however. Gilead had chances during the past few years to acquire Galapagos at a lower price than what it’s paying for the partnership now. That feels like a missed opportunity, and may seem even more so if its  pipeline and R&D platform turn out to be as strong as O’Day seems to think they are.To contact the author of this story: Max Nisen at mnisen@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Beth Williams at bewilliams@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Max Nisen is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering biotech, pharma and health care. He previously wrote about management and corporate strategy for Quartz and Business Insider.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Gilead to Boost Stake in Galapagos as Part of $5.1 Billion Deal
    Bloomberg

    Gilead to Boost Stake in Galapagos as Part of $5.1 Billion Deal

    (Bloomberg) -- Gilead Sciences Inc. agreed to pay $5.1 billion to raise its stake in biotechnology company Galapagos NV to deepen its research into inflammatory diseases and other disorders, sending the Belgian drugmaker’s stock to an all-time high.The deal is the largest Gilead has executed since new Chief Executive Officer Dan O’Day took the reins in March as he attempts to bolster the San Francisco giant’s drug pipeline. Gilead is in danger of becoming a victim of its own success after launching some of the top drugs of all time, its bestselling hepatitis-C franchise. Sales from those therapies have since declined due to increased competition.Under the agreement, Gilead, which will pay $3.95 billion upfront to Mechelen, Belgium-based Galapagos and invest $1.1 billion to raise its stake to 22% from 12.3%, the companies said in a statement. The investment, at 140.59 euros a share, is 9.7% higher than the Belgian company’s closing price on Friday. Galapagos shares surged as much as 17% on Monday, reaching 149.55 euros a share.“Gilead will significantly expand its pipeline in a smart and financially savvy expanded partnership deal with Galapagos, essentially gaining options on everything in their pipeline without having to acquire the company full out,” Jefferies analysts including Michael J. Yee and Andrew Tsai wrote in a note.As Gilead seeks to fill the growing hole left from its hepatitis drugs, the Galapagos announcement may signal a shift in focus. The smaller biotech has no oncology programs and instead focuses on research into diseases that have to do with inflammation and fibrosis, which is a kind of internal scarring.Gilead has also had research programs in such diseases, including through its collaboration with Galapagos, though some had speculated it may stake its future on cancer. Gilead is already the biggest shareholder of the Belgium company before the increase in stake, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. Now it gets the option to license all of Galapogos’s future, late-stage drug candidates.Gilead CEOO’Day, who joined Gilead from cancer giant Roche AG, said he’s not done making good on his promise to expand the pipeline. He noted the deal almost doubles Gilead’s research capacity and establishes a strong research base in Europe where the company has historically not been as active.“In no way is this the only thing that we’re looking at or the only thing that we’re going to do,” O’Day said in an interview. “You can look at this like it’s the beginning.”Gilead and Galapagos held talks about an expanded partnership prior to O’Day joining the company. He was briefed on those discussions after taking the top job and within the first couple of weeks, got to know the CEO of Galapagos better. Following those talks, the pair decided to being finalizing the agreement.Jobs in EuropeThis is a “science-driven deal,” Onno van de Stolpe, founder and chief executive officer of Galapagos, said in an interview. Gilead will be taking on more of the commercial side for Galapagos, helping the smaller company to focus on research. “We can now do more of what we’re good at.”The money being invested beyond the equity stake will be used largely to double Galapagos’s R&D staff to 1,000 from 500 over an unspecified time, Van de Stolpe said. Those jobs will be added in Belgium, the Netherlands and France. “It’s massive funding -- we don’t have a detailed plan yet on how to spend it,” he said.The pact includes a provision in which Gilead’s stake could rise to 29.9%, if Galapagos shareholders approve two warrants. The companies were already partners on an experimental drug for rheumatoid arthritis. That drug, filgotinib, hit its main goal in a late-stage study in March, triggering the Belgian biotech company’s shares to surge by the most in six months.Galapagos shares have risen 59% since the start of the year, compared with the 5.9% gain in Gilead’s stock.O’Day had a reputation as a dealmaker while at Roche, likely one of the reasons he was selected for Gilead’s top job at a time when the company needs to look externally to drive growth. He said that in this case, the companies opted for a partnership-style deal rather than a full takeover because full mergers can often destroy innovation as research and executive teams disband. Roche’s deal philosophy is much the same with the Swiss giant opting to leave many its units independently managed, even if it owns them in full.Gilead spent about $12 billion to buy Kite Pharma in 2017 for its research into a cutting-edge therapies known as CAR-T. While the treatments can prove near-miraculous for some patients, CAR-Ts have yet to become large sales drivers, falling far below the revenues Gilead needs to replace declining sales from its hepatitis-C franchise.Gilead is not the only large company with fading blockbusters. In June, AbbVie agreed to buy Allergan in a $63 billion megadeal in a bid to replace its bestselling Humira, the bestselling drug in the world. Celgene Corp. faced similar questions as the patent of its bestselling cancer drug aged before Bristol-Myers Squibb agreed to buy it for $74 billion in January.To contact the reporters on this story: Eric Pfanner in London at epfanner1@bloomberg.net;Rebecca Spalding in Boston at rspalding@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: James Ludden at jludden@bloomberg.net, ;Drew Armstrong at darmstrong17@bloomberg.net, Kevin Miller, Linus ChuaFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

  • What Should We Expect From Roche Holding AG's (VTX:ROG) Earnings In The Years Ahead?
    Simply Wall St.

    What Should We Expect From Roche Holding AG's (VTX:ROG) Earnings In The Years Ahead?

    The latest earnings announcement Roche Holding AG (VTX:ROG) released in January 2019 suggested that the business...

  • Bloomberg

    Donald Trump’s Three-Letter Threat to Brexiters

    Had Donald Trump’s state visit this week come, say, six months earlier, the course of Brexit might look very different. Trump’s statement that Britain’s state-run National Health Service and “everything else” would be on the table in any future trade talks may have been a throwaway line. Trump rowed back the comments the next day, saying he doesn’t consider the NHS a trade issue.

  • Benzinga

    The Daily Biotech Pulse: ASCO Presentations From Roche, Celgene & More, Edwards Recommends Rejection Of Mini-Tender Offer

    Here's a roundup of top developments in the biotech space over the last 24 hours. Scaling The Peaks (Biotech stocks hitting 52-week highs on June 3) Adverum Biotechnologies Inc (NASDAQ: ADVM ) Array Biopharma ...

  • Is Roche Holding AG (VTX:ROG) A Financially Sound Company?
    Simply Wall St.

    Is Roche Holding AG (VTX:ROG) A Financially Sound Company?

    There are a number of reasons that attract investors towards large-cap companies such as Roche Holding AG (VTX:ROG...

  • These 3 Major Drug Manufacturers Are Strong Performers
    GuruFocus.com

    These 3 Major Drug Manufacturers Are Strong Performers

    Roche Holding AG (RHHBY) has climbed 2.4% over the last week, 0.5% over the past month, 5.7% so far this year, 17.6% over the last 52 weeks and 5.3% over the past three years through May 20. Warning! GuruFocus has detected 3 Warning Signs with RHHBY. Currently, the company is paying an annual dividend of $1.07 per common share, which, based on the closing share price on May 20, leads to a forward dividend yield of 3.27% versus the industry median of 1.66%.

  • Benzinga

    The Daily Biotech Pulse: FDA Nod For Roche, Trial Results For Agios, Iovance And MacroGenics

    Here's a roundup of top developments in the biotech space over the last 24 hours. Scaling The Peaks (Biotech stocks hitting 52-week highs on May 15) Applied Therapeutics Inc (NASDAQ: APLT ) (debuted on ...

  • GuruFocus.com

    AstraZeneca Needs New Breast Cancer Drug to be Blockbuster

    AstraZeneca (ZN) needs a blockbuster to justify its nearly $7 billion investment for a share of Japan-based Daiichi Sankyo's (TSE:4568) drug to treat a type of breast cancer. Warning! GuruFocus has detected 5 Warning Signs with AZN. The HER2-targeting antibody drug conjugate (ADC) and potential new medicine was evaluated in patients with HER2-positive, unresectable and/or metastatic breast cancer previously treated with another drug combination.