RYA.L - Ryanair Holdings plc

LSE - LSE Delayed Price. Currency in EUR
10.64
+0.03 (+0.24%)
At close: 9:15AM BST
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Performance Outlook
  • Short Term
    2W - 6W
  • Mid Term
    6W - 9M
  • Long Term
    9M+
Previous Close10.61
Open10.64
Bid9.50 x 0
Ask10.94 x 0
Day's Range10.64 - 10.76
52 Week Range8.05 - 1,251.50
Volume23,973
Avg. Volume3,850,854
Market Cap11.589B
Beta (5Y Monthly)1.09
PE Ratio (TTM)18.38
EPS (TTM)N/A
Earnings DateN/A
Forward Dividend & YieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-Dividend DateFeb 12, 2015
1y Target EstN/A
Fair Value is the appropriate price for the shares of a company, based on its earnings and growth rate also interpreted as when P/E Ratio = Growth Rate. Estimated return represents the projected annual return you might expect after purchasing shares in the company and holding them over the default time horizon of 5 years, based on the EPS growth rate that we have projected.
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      (Bloomberg) -- Ryanair Holdings Plc boosted its liquidity with a 600 million-pound ($726 million) loan backed by the U.K. government and said the coronavirus crisis will reduce passenger numbers by half over the next year.Europe’s biggest low-cost carrier is tapping Britain’s Covid Corporate Financing Facility as it digs in for a slow recovery that’s set to see a price war across a much diminished air-travel market, it said in a statement Monday. Group operations are under review and its Austrian arm could close.While Chief Executive Officer Michael O’Leary aims to resume flying in July in a bid to rescue at least some revenue this summer, Ryanair said it expects to carry fewer than 80 million passengers in the 12 months through March 2021, compared with an original target of 154 million. Bookings are edging up, but not enough to stem losses in what’s usually the peak season.“We’re seeing a little bit of a pickup,” Chief Financial Officer Neil Sorahan said. “There’s definitely people starting to look at kind of August September out to get some sun before the kids go back to school.” The company said it will book a loss of more than 200 million euros ($216 million) for the June quarter and a smaller hit in the three months through September.Ryanair shares were trading 4.6% higher at 8.84 euros as of 8:10 a.m. in Dublin, where the group is based, paring the stock’s decline this year to 40%.The company, which counts London Stansted as its biggest base, tapped the U.K.’s support program after vehemently arguing against aid for its rivals, though Sorahan said the funding doesn’t compare to billions of euros destined for Deutsche Lufthansa AG and Air France-KLM.The Bank of England-administered CCFF is available to all firms with an investment grade credit rating “whether you’re a house builder, an airline or a boot manufacturer,” the CFO said. “It’s not illegal state aid.”The funding lifts Ryanair’s cash balance to 4.1 billion euros, giving it “one of the strongest cash positions in the industry,” according to Sanford C. Bernstein analyst Daniel Roeska, who said the company could probably withstand a shutdown beyond the end of the calendar year without a need for fresh equity.Job CutsO’Leary is also slashing costs by deferring capital investments, suspending share buybacks and cutting management pay, and plans to eliminate 3,000 pilot, cabin crew and office jobs, with remaining staff taking a 20% salary cut. With more than 99% of flights grounded the average weekly cash burn has dropped from 200 million euros in March to just over 60 million euros.Active negotiations are underway with Boeing Co. about reducing planned deliveries of 737 Max jets -- a model currently grounded after two crashes -- over the next 24 months to reflect slower traffic, as well as with leasing firms providing Airbus SE A320s to the Vienna-based Lauda arm.Expenses at Lauda, acquired in 2018, remain ahead of the rest of the group, and with Lufthansa’s Austrian arm set to receive about 800 million euros in support the business’s future is in doubt, according to the statement. The base will close at the end of this month with more than 300 job losses if costs cuts aren’t achieved, it said.”Lauda is a massive challenge,” Sorahan said. “There’s a restructuring going on which requires significant cost cutting. If that doesn’t happen then unfortunately the base will have to close and the A320s will have to come out.”Ryanair reported a profit of 1 billion euros for fiscal 2020, before exceptional items, within its guided range of 950 million euros to 1.05 billion euros. The net figure was dragged down by 353 million-euro charge against losses from jet-fuel hedges.(Updates with shares in fifth paragraph, analyst comment in eighth, fleet negotiations in 10th)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

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      Ryanair has cut more than 250 staff in offices in Dublin, London, Madrid and Wroclaw, Poland, Europe's largest low-cost airline said on Friday. The Irish company is continuing to meet its pilot and cabin crew unions across Europe to finalise up to 3,000 job cuts and 20% pay cuts with further announcements on crew job losses and pay cuts expected before the end of May, it added. "While we expect to re-open our offices from 1 June next, we will not require the same number of support team members in a year when we will carry less than 100 million passengers, against an original budget of 155 million," Ryanair's People Director Darrell Hughes said in a statement.

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      Ryanair plans to move back towards an all-Boeing fleet by cancelling leases for Airbus A320s for its Lauda subsidiary and likely replacing 30 Airbus jets at the Austrian airline with Boeing 737s, Chief Executive Michael O'Leary told Reuters. Ryanair's purchase in 2018 of Airbus operator Lauda was pitched as a way to diversify the fleet of the budget airline group, which had until then exclusively flown Boeing jets and currently has over 450 737s. O'Leary, whose expansion plans have been curtailed by the grounding of Boeing's 737 MAX, said in March last year he was in early talks with Airbus about an order for 100 A321s and that Ryanair wanted to have a dual Boeing-Airbus fleet.

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      Ryanair has set out its vision of future flying. And it will be a very different experience on board. Passengers will be urged to wear masks. And queuing for the toilet is banned. Instead you’ll have to ask cabin crew for permission to use the facilities. Though there’s no mention of any charge at least. The new rules are part of Ryanair’s plans to resume services. Europe’s biggest budget airline says it will operate 40% of normal operations from July 1. That will see 1,000 flights a day, up from just 30 now. But the firm expects at least half of the seats to be empty, saying demand is ‘anemic’. Passengers will also have to fill out a form saying where they’re staying, and for how long. That information will be passed to governments. The UK this week said it would require all arrivals to quarantine for 14 days. British Airways-owner IAG says that could delay recovery for air travel. On Tuesday (May 12) Ryanair boss Michael O’Leary was blunter. He called the plan "idiotic" and unenforceable, and predicted it would be widely ignored.

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      City Bulletin: Ryanair sets July 1 target to get 40% of planes back in the air

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