RYA.L - Ryanair Holdings plc

LSE - LSE Delayed Price. Currency in EUR
15.18
+0.01 (+0.07%)
At close: 4:39PM GMT
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Previous Close15.16
Open15.32
Bid15.16 x 0
Ask15.18 x 0
Day's Range15.12 - 15.58
52 Week Range15.12 - 1,696.50
Volume1,258,842
Avg. Volume2,078,278
Market Cap16.214B
Beta (5Y Monthly)0.60
PE Ratio (TTM)19.46
EPS (TTM)0.78
Earnings DateN/A
Forward Dividend & YieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-Dividend DateFeb 12, 2015
1y Target Est14.77
  • Ryanair raises profit forecast after healthy holiday season
    Reuters Videos

    Ryanair raises profit forecast after healthy holiday season

    Ryanair shares flew high on Friday (January 10). As the Irish airline raised its full-year profit forecast after a strong performance over Christmas and New Year. Europe's largest low-cost operator expects a profit of between 950 million and 1 billion euros for its financial year to the end of March. That's well up on its previous estimate of 800 to 900 million euros it projected in November. Ryanair's shares were up 7 per cent on the update. January to April bookings are better-than-expected and come just a month after Ryanair had to cut its summer capacity. That was due to Boeing delaying its return of the grounded 737 MAX to the air. Analysts said Ryanair could be the first sign of recovery in airline sector profits, and helped lift shares in other airlines. Fellow budget carriers Easyjet jumped 3.4% While Hungarian rival Wizz Air saw shares jump more than 4%. Stocks in British-Airways owned IAG were also up 4.5%.

  • The EU Green Dream
    Bloomberg

    The EU Green Dream

    Dec.11 -- European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen will present her “Green Deal” in Brussels today aiming to turn the EU into a climate-neutral bloc within the next 30 years. Her pitch will include a timeline for various laws to be put forward between now and the end of her term affecting sectors across the economy. Bloomberg’s Maria Tadeo reports on “Bloomberg Markets: European Open.”

  • Financial Times

    EasyJet/Ryanair: vice report

    “Competition is a sin!” railed oil tycoon John D Rockefeller. One fewer for low-cost European airline easyJet is certainly proving beneficial. Revenue per seat rose almost 9 per cent in the three months to December, helped by the collapse of rival Thomas Cook in September.

  • Ryanair says could start getting Boeing 737 MAX by April
    Reuters

    Ryanair says could start getting Boeing 737 MAX by April

    Ryanair could receive its first deliveries of up to 10 grounded 737 MAX aircraft from Boeing by April, Chief Marketing Officer Kenny Jacobs said on Tuesday, but cautioned the timing was dependent on regulators. The 737 MAX, Boeing's fastest-selling aircraft, has not flown since last March following two crashes which claimed 346 lives.

  • Bloomberg

    Ryanair Boss Might Get His $110 Million Bonus

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- When shareholders narrowly voted to approve a possible 99 million euros ($110 million) bonus for Ryanair Holdings Plc boss Michael O’Leary in September, it seemed unlikely they’d actually have to pay him the money.The terms of the reward plan require O’Leary to get the stock price back above 21 euros, and at the time of the annual meeting it was languishing at less than 10 euros. (Alternatively he needs to double net profit).How times have changed. On Friday the shares jumped as much as 11% after Ryanair reported stronger than expected Christmas sales and ticket prices. The stock has gained almost two-thirds since the AGM, meaning O’Leary’s windfall is back within grasp. His stock options are triggered if the share price exceeds 21 euros for a four-week period between April 2021 and March 2024.A year ago I wrote that Ryanair’s bonus plan is pretty egregious because the share price might jump for reasons that have nothing to do with O’Leary’s skills as a manager. Guess what? That’s exactly what has happened — in myriad fortunate ways. European stocks have rallied since September thanks in part to the massive liquidity boost provided by the U.S. Federal Reserve. And airlines stocks in general have far outstripped the average for a variety of economic and structural factors.Boris Johnson’s thumping U.K. election victory means a no-deal Brexit is off the table (for now) and has boosted the pound, which is positive for Ryanair’s British revenues. And Thomas Cook Group Plc’s insolvency and cash-strapped Norwegian Air Shuttle’s diminished ambitions have supported ticket prices because of less competition.Another factor supporting prices is the grounding of Boeing Co.’s 737 Max following two fatal crashes, which means an expected surge of aircraft capacity hasn’t materialized.Ryanair is, of course, a big 737 Max customer and Boeing’s inability to deliver those planes has been extremely disruptive for O’Leary and limited his ability to expand. Yet one silver lining is that his airline has cut back on less profitable routes and is no longer struggling with a pilot shortage, which contributed to recent labor unrest and investor concerns about rising personnel costs. One day the 737 Max will fly again, at which time a capacity glut will probably re-emerge; analysts at Citigroup Inc. note the size of the 737 Max order book in Europe is equivalent to 9% of the continent’s entire aircraft fleet.While analysts have turned more positive on Ryanair shares, the stock is 14% higher than their average price target, according to Bloomberg data. Based on the company’s updated profit guidance for the year to March of about 1 billion euros, the stock trades on a steep 18 times earnings. Higher fuel prices amid the conflicts in the Middle East could yet bring the airline sector back down to earth.Still, O’Leary has a decent shout at getting his money for doing very little. That shows how misguided Ryanair’s pay practices were.To contact the author of this story: Chris Bryant at cbryant32@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: James Boxell at jboxell@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Chris Bryant is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering industrial companies. He previously worked for the Financial Times.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Bloomberg

    Ryanair Raises Profit Guidance After Christmas Travel Boom

    (Bloomberg) -- Want the lowdown on European markets? In your inbox before the open, every day. Sign up here.Airline shares surged in Europe after Ryanair Holdings Plc said it expects to post a bigger-than-expected full-year profit following a spike in lucrative last-minute bookings over the Christmas and New Year holiday.Europe’s biggest discount airline now anticipates earnings for the 12 months through March of between 950 million euros ($1.06 billion) and 1.05 billion euros, and most likely in the middle of that range, according to a statement on Friday. It had previously forecast 800 million euros to 900 million euros.The spate of late bookings helped lift yields, a measure of fares, according to Ryanair, which reports third-quarter results on Feb. 3. Sales for January through April are also 1% up on this time last year and that should result in slightly better pricing in the fourth quarter, with the full-year passenger tally reaching 154 million, or 1 million more than previously forecast.Ryanair’s guidance is a respite to carriers after the International Air Transport Association warned last month that global industry profits would come in lower than forecast as geopolitical tensions, social unrest and uncertainty around Brexit contributed to tougher business conditions. Reduced capacity growth following a spate of European airline bankruptcies and the continued grounding of Boeing Co.‘s 737 Max jetliner may have improved yields.“If a more benign capacity is indeed the root cause of the upgrade, Ryanair is unlikely to be the only one to benefit,” Daniel Roeska, an analyst at Sanford C. Bernstein in London, said in a note to clients. “With the Max still grounded and capacity growth at lower levels, this may indicate a better yield environment through winter and a more supportive trajectory for sector profits.”Ryanair shares traded 7.4% higher at 16.34 euros as of 9:56 a.m. in Dublin, levels last seen about 18 months ago. Low-cost rivals EasyJet Plc and Wizz Air Holdings rose as much as 7.4% and 7.2% respectively, while IAG SA, the parent of British Airways, gained 5.3%.Ryanair has been reining in growth plans for this year after deliveries of the 737 Max jetliner, which had been due to swell capacity, were halted worldwide in March. The Irish carrier has yet to receive any of the high-density variants it has on order.The picture’s not all rosy, with the Austrian Laudamotion unit set to see losses for the year widen to about 90 million euros from a previous estimate of under 80 million euros after lower-than-expected average Christmas fares amid “intense price competition,” Ryanair said.(Updates with analyst comments in fifth paragraph.)To contact the reporter on this story: Siddharth Philip in London at sphilip3@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Tara Patel at tpatel2@bloomberg.net, Christopher Jasper, John BowkerFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • European stocks under pressure after Iran missile strikes rattle investors
    MarketWatch

    European stocks under pressure after Iran missile strikes rattle investors

    European stock markets kicked off Wednesday’s trading lower as investors assessed the risk for increased tensions after Iran fired missiles at Iraq air bases housing U.S. troops.

  • FTSE 100 climbs as oil prices surge after U.S. killing of Iranian general
    MarketWatch

    FTSE 100 climbs as oil prices surge after U.S. killing of Iranian general

    The FTSE 100 fell on Friday but avoided heavier losses as oil prices surged following the U.S. killing of top Iranian general Qasem Soleimani.

  • Ryanair CEO says group may not get 737 MAX until October: report
    Reuters

    Ryanair CEO says group may not get 737 MAX until October: report

    Ryanair may only receive its first delivery of the grounded 737 MAX aircraft from Boeing in October, chief executive Michael O'Leary said in an interview with German magazine Wirtschaftswoche. The 737 MAX, Boeing's fastest-selling aircraft, has not flown since last March following two crashes which claimed 346 lives. O'Leary told Reuters last month that Ryanair may not receive any MAX aircraft in time for its summer season.

  • Ryanair CEO says group may not get 737 MAX until October - report
    Reuters

    Ryanair CEO says group may not get 737 MAX until October - report

    Ryanair may only receive its first delivery of the grounded 737 MAX aircraft from Boeing in October, chief executive Michael O'Leary said in an interview with German magazine Wirtschaftswoche. The 737 MAX, Boeing's fastest-selling aircraft, has not flown since last March following two crashes which claimed 346 lives. O'Leary told Reuters last month that Ryanair may not receive any MAX aircraft in time for its summer season.

  • Reuters

    Russia's St Petersburg airport expects to host Ryanair, other low-costers in 2020

    Low-cost airline Ryanair and other budget carriers are expected to start flying from Russia's St Petersburg airport in 2020, the Russian Transport Ministry said. The move is part of Russia's plan to boost tourist flows to St Petersburg and will mean more competition for Russian air carriers, including national flag carrier Aeroflot. The ministry said on Tuesday that Ryanair, EasyJet, WizzAir, Volotea, Air Baltic and Fly One had expressed interest in flights from St Petersburg's Pulkovo airport, Russia's fourth largest after Moscow's three major hubs.

  • Court rejects Ryanair's bid to delay operations chief's easyJet move
    Reuters

    Court rejects Ryanair's bid to delay operations chief's easyJet move

    The Irish High Court on Monday rejected Ryanair's attempt to prevent operations chief Peter Bellew from joining rival easyJet until 2021, saying a 12-month non-compete clause was unenforceable. The Irish airline said it had instructed its lawyers to appeal. Ryanair had argued during two weeks of hearings that Bellew possessed information of immense competitive value and was bound by a non-compete clause that the airline said should prevent him from starting work at the British low-cost rival until January 2021.

  • Ruling on Ryanair bid to delay COO's easyJet move set for next week
    Reuters

    Ruling on Ryanair bid to delay COO's easyJet move set for next week

    An Irish High Court judge hopes to rule next week on whether Ryanair can prevent its operations chief Peter Bellew from joining arch-rival easyJet until 2021. Ryanair has argued that Bellew possesses information of competitive value and that he is bound by a non-compete clause. Former Malaysia Airlines boss Bellew denies he is subject to the clause and plans to start working with the British airline at the start of 2020 after completing a six-month notice period.

  • Outgoing Ryanair COO felt like 'dead man walking' - court hears
    Reuters

    Outgoing Ryanair COO felt like 'dead man walking' - court hears

    Ryanair's outgoing chief operations officer Peter Bellew considered himself a "dead man walking" after a March performance review and resigned after being ordered to work at the airline's Austrian business, he said on Thursday. Bellew was speaking in court during a case brought by Ryanair to delay him joining rival easyJet for 12 months until 2021. Ryanair has said Bellew possesses information of competitive value covered by a non-compete clause.