SAF.PA - Safran SA

Paris - Paris Delayed Price. Currency in EUR
145.95
+3.85 (+2.71%)
As of 11:27AM CET. Market open.
Stock chart is not supported by your current browser
Previous Close142.10
Open143.75
Bid0.00 x 0
Ask0.00 x 0
Day's Range143.60 - 146.30
52 Week Range109.15 - 150.85
Volume263,226
Avg. Volume660,004
Market Cap61.022B
Beta (5Y Monthly)0.72
PE Ratio (TTM)29.09
EPS (TTM)5.02
Earnings DateFeb 27, 2020
Forward Dividend & Yield1.82 (1.30%)
Ex-Dividend DateMay 27, 2019
1y Target Est119.08
  • Why Safran SA (EPA:SAF) Is A Dividend Rockstar
    Simply Wall St.

    Why Safran SA (EPA:SAF) Is A Dividend Rockstar

    Is Safran SA (EPA:SAF) a good dividend stock? How can we tell? Dividend paying companies with growing earnings can be...

  • Reuters

    Boeing plans to stage first flight of 777X plane this week -sources

    Boeing plans to carry out the first test flight of its delayed 777X airplane later this week, said two people familiar with the matter on Tuesday. A source close to one of the wide-body jet's nine firm customers said the flight would take place on Thursday or Friday at Boeing's commercial base outside Seattle, depending on weather. Boeing could not immediately be reached for comment.

  • Tweedy Browne's Top 4 Sells of the 4th Quarter
    GuruFocus.com

    Tweedy Browne's Top 4 Sells of the 4th Quarter

    Global Value Fund’s largest reduction is in German digital publisher Continue reading...

  • Boeing Suppliers Shift the Balance of Power, One Deal at a Time
    Bloomberg

    Boeing Suppliers Shift the Balance of Power, One Deal at a Time

    (Bloomberg Opinion) -- A would-be Boeing Co. takeover target has found its own dance partner.Woodward Inc., a maker of cockpit controls and engine-actuation systems, announced late Sunday that it’s merging with fellow aerospace supplier Hexcel Corp. The all-stock deal values Hexcel, a maker of lightweight composite materials, at about $7.5 billion including debt, with Woodward shareholders set to own about 55% of the combined company. While both suppliers have felt the sting of  Boeing’s 737 Max grounding, executives said Sunday that the deal wasn’t a response to that crisis but rather an effort to position the combined company to better compete in the pursuit of more fuel-efficient engines.The effort to sell this merger as a play on climate change is interesting, and it shows the degree to which companies are taking seriously the increasing criticism of greenhouse-gas emissions. At the same time, it’s hard to extricate Boeing and its Max woes from the context of the deal. Just two years ago, it might have been Boeing making these kinds of arguments about the benefits of scale and combined research-and-development budgets.Boeing held preliminary talks with Woodward as it scouted targets for its push to build a services division with $50 billion in sales, according to reports in early 2018 from Bloomberg News and the Wall Street Journal. Woodward pushed back on those reports and said it wasn’t in discussions with Boeing on a possible sale. Boeing instead acquired KLX Inc.’s aerospace-distribution business for $4.25 billion and announced an auxiliary power unit joint venture with Safran SA. This added to home-grown efforts in avionics and cabin interiors and spooked investors in traditional suppliers of those parts and services.As recently as May, ex-Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg was talking about the prospect of additional deals in the vein of KLX – “a substantial, multi-billion dollar acquisition, but one that was complementary.” With the now 10-month Max grounding draining Boeing’s cash flow and mounting scrutiny over the company’s corporate culture and the integrity of its design process, it’s highly unlikely the company will be making acquisitions anytime soon, and entirely possible that its parts and services ambitions go no further.That creates an opportunity for its suppliers, and Woodward and Hexcel are right to seize the moment to gain more clout, particularly as it looks increasingly likely that Boeing will have to speed up development of a narrow-body successor to the 737. With new technologies requiring ever-higher levels of spending, it also just helps to have a bigger balance sheet. Woodward and Hexcel expect to spend $250 million on R&D in the first year after the deal closes, or about 5% of combined sales. That’s a roughly 15% step-up from estimated 2019 levels, notes Jefferies analyst Sheila Kahyaoglu. “Woodward and Hexcel touch nearly every aspect of aerospace design,” Hexcel CEO Nick Stanage, who will retain that role at the combined company, said on a conference call Sunday. The merged entity will be well-positioned to deliver “integrated systems that satisfy demands for aircraft aerodynamics, energy efficiency, improved safety and reduced emissions and noise.”The Woodward-Hexcel combination follows a United Technologies Corp. $100 billion buying spree over the past two years that saw the engine maker link up with avionics supplier Rockwell Collins Inc. and defense contractor Raytheon Co., as well as smaller tie-ups between Parker-Hannifin Corp. and Exotic Metals Forming Co. and TransDigm Group Inc. and Esterline Technologies Corp. Analysts expressed some caution on Hexcel and Woodward’s ambitious goal of generating $1 billion of cash flow in the first fiscal year after closing, and time will tell if the companies can follow through. But strategically, it’s a bold and smart move that should give the companies an upper hand in both the battle against climate change and any future battles with Boeing.  To contact the author of this story: Brooke Sutherland at bsutherland7@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Beth Williams at bewilliams@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Brooke Sutherland is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering deals and industrial companies. She previously wrote an M&A column for Bloomberg News.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Reuters

    China’s bid to challenge Boeing and Airbus falters

    BEIJING/PARIS (Reuters) - Development of China’s C919 single-aisle plane, already at least five years behind schedule, is going slower than expected, a dozen people familiar with the programme told Reuters, as the state-owned Commercial Aircraft Corporation (COMAC) struggles with a range of technical issues that have severely restricted test flights. Delays are common in complex aerospace programmes, but the especially slow progress is a potential embarrassment for China, which has invested heavily in its first serious attempt to break the hold of Boeing and Airbus on the global jet market. COMAC engineers miscalculated the forces that would be placed on the plane's twin engines in flight - known in the industry as loads - and sent inaccurate data to the engine manufacturer, CFM International, four people familiar with the matter told Reuters.

  • Boeing Shares Rise on Speculation Missile Downed Ukrainian Jet
    Bloomberg

    Boeing Shares Rise on Speculation Missile Downed Ukrainian Jet

    (Bloomberg) -- Boeing Co. shares rose on reports that an accidental missile strike or terrorist bomb, rather than mechanical mishap, may be responsible for the crash of Ukrainian jet near Tehran on Wednesday.Ukraine International Airlines Flight 752 disappeared from radar screens at 8,000 feet, and witnesses said they saw it on fire in the air, according to Iran’s Civil Aviation Organization. The flight-data and cockpit-voice recorders were damaged but their core memory appears to be accessible, a report by the aviation organization said.The findings are the first officially released from a probe fraught with difficulty amid heightened U.S.-Iranian tensions. Ukraine added to confusion around the crash, saying it’s looking at whether the jet was downed by a missile or bomb after Iran had insisted it fell victim to a technical failure or engine fire.Newsweek and CBS reported that U.S. officials concluded that the jet was struck by an anti-aircraft missile system. Neither outlet identified the officials in their accounts, which helped propel Boeing to session highs in New York trading with a gain of as much as 1.9%.Ukraine is reviewing a number of scenarios that might explain the disaster, Ukraine’s National Security & Defense Council Secretary Oleksiy Danilov said on Facebook, pointing to supposed evidence of missile debris found near the crash site and circulated on the Internet. The head of Iran’s accident-investigation office, Hassan Rezaeifar, said no such parts were found and that any images are false.Alternative possibilities put forward by Ukraine include a collision with a drone or other flying object, as well as destruction of an engine due to technical reasons, Danilov said.Iran has invoked an international agreement to get assistance from other countries involved in the tragedy, and Ukraine said its contingent includes experts who participated in a probe into Malaysia Airlines Flight 17, downed in 2014 by a surface-to-air missile during the conflict over Crimea and the eastern Donbas region.American agencies including the National Transport Safety Board are weighing whether it’s legal to engage with Iranian authorities under terms of sanctions against the country, according to people familiar with the matter. They’re also concerned about sending people to Iran given recent military strikes.The latest comments from Ukraine add to confusion about what led the Kyiv-bound 737-800 to plunge from the sky near Tehran minutes after taking off, killing all of the 176 people aboard.A video purportedly shot by a bystander showed flames coming from the jet as it streaked across the night sky and burst into a fireball on impact. “The plane is on fire,” an unidentified male can be heard saying. “In the name of God, God help, call the firefighters.”Iranian authorities initially blamed technical issues and then an engine fire. Ukraine International said it didn’t “even consider” the possibility of crew error, and the Ukrainian embassy in Tehran ruled out terrorism before amending its statement to offer no comment on possible causes.Ukraine President Volodymyr Zelenskiy on Thursday called on parties not to “manipulate” the events, saying no conclusions can be drawn until experts have considered all of the evidence.The recently serviced, three-year-old Boeing -- different to the company’s grounded Max model -- went down without a distress call and after its global-positioning transmissions were unusually cut off mid-air. The crash came in the wake of an Iranian missile attack on two Iraqi military bases in retaliation for an American drone strike last week that killed one of Iran’s top generals.Under the United Nation’s International Civil Aviation Organization, crash probes are led by the nation where a plane was destroyed. In addition, countries where the aircraft and key components were made usually take part.Canadians Killed in Iran Plane Crash Part of Large DiasporaThe U.S. NTSB routinely participates in dozens of crash investigations around the world under the ICAO process, known as Annex 13.By notifying ICAO, Iran suggested it might be open to U.S. help in the probe, said the two people. But the Islamic Republic has sent mixed signals, with some officials being quoted as saying they would not allow Americans to analyze the plane’s two crash-proof flight recorders, for example.American law also prohibits the NTSB from working in Iran because of longstanding bans on conducting business in that country. The NTSB has occasionally assisted in accident investigations there, but had to obtain special permission from the U.S. Treasury.“The NTSB is monitoring developments surrounding the crash of Ukraine International Flight 752 and is following its standard procedures for international aviation accident investigations, including long-standing restrictions under the country embargoes,” the agency said, adding that it was working with the State Department to determine a course of action.The State Department offered assistance to Ukraine, but notably didn’t mention helping Iran. “The United States calls for complete cooperation with any investigation into the cause of the crash,” the department said.Some aviation safety experts said the plane’s sudden fall as it apparently was engulfed in fire might have been from a bomb or missile.“Airplanes don’t just catch fire and have that fire spread like that in such a short period of time, unless there was an intentional act causing that fire and explosion,” Jeffrey Guzzetti, former chief of the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration’s accident investigation division said in an interview.It’s at least theoretically possible for a fast-moving cargo fire to take down a plane, said Roger Cox, a former NTSB investigator. A ValuJet plane crashed in Florida in 1996 after pure oxygen caused a raging inferno, he said. But in that case, the plane flew for about 10 minutes, far longer than the Ukrainian jet.The tragedy strikes during a deeply challenging period for Boeing, gripped by one of the worst crises in its 103-year history after two deadly crashes involving the 737 Max led to its global idling in March.Earlier 737s like the one that came down in Iran don’t use the flight-control system implicated in the Indonesian and Ethiopian events. The crash was also the first at Ukraine International since it was set up in 1992.Engines for the single-aisle plane are made by CFM International, a venture of General Electric Co. and Safran SA. A representative didn’t comment on the details or possible cause of the crash but said by email that CFM extends “heartfelt sympathies to the families and loved ones of those on board.”Boeing’s shares slid 1.8% on Wednesday, their biggest loss since Dec. 16. The company hasn’t commented on possible reasons for the crash.(Updates with Iranian comment on missile theory from fourth paragraph)\--With assistance from Will Davies and Daryna Krasnolutska.To contact the reporters on this story: Arsalan Shahla in Tehran at ashahla@bloomberg.net;Aliaksandr Kudrytski in Minsk, Belarus at akudrytski@bloomberg.net;Alan Levin in Washington at alevin24@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Young-Sam Cho at ycho2@bloomberg.net, ;Tara Patel at tpatel2@bloomberg.net, ;Brendan Case at bcase4@bloomberg.net, Christopher Jasper, Andrew NoëlFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Iran Jet Crash Leaves Mystery With Probe Curbed by Tensions
    Bloomberg

    Iran Jet Crash Leaves Mystery With Probe Curbed by Tensions

    (Bloomberg) -- As investigators sift through the charred wreckage of a jetliner that crashed shortly after takeoff from Tehran, contradictory reports have emerged about what might have caused the Boeing Co. 737-800 to abruptly plunge out of the sky.Iranian authorities initially blamed “technical” causes then said an engine fire most likely led to the loss of Ukraine International Airlines Flight 752, killing all 176 people on board. The Ukrainian embassy in Tehran at first ruled out terrorism, then amended its statement to offer no comment on possible causes.Given that the crash on Wednesday came hours after a barrage of Iranian missiles were fired on U.S. bases in Iraq, speculation also turned to a possible accidental attack by Tehran’s own air defense system.The recently serviced, three-year-old jet went down without a distress call and after its global-positioning transmissions were cut off mid-air -- unusual for a crash. A video purportedly shot by a bystander shows flames coming from the jet as it streaked across the night sky and burst into a fireball on impact.“The plane is on fire,” an unidentified male voice can be heard on the video. “In the name of God, God help, call the firefighters.”Meanwhile, the investigation is being hampered by the tension between Iran and the U.S.The U.S. National Transportation Safety Board, which would normally be invited to participate in a crash probe of a U.S.-built jetliner, issued a cautious statement saying it is monitoring the situation. Long-existing U.S. sanctions against Iran require the NTSB to seek special permission to participate in any investigations in that country.Iran’s Disaster Mitigation and Management Organization said early assessments indicated the cause was a technical issue, while the transport ministry suggested an engine fire was involved.A veteran aviation accident investigator said the flight-tracking data and amateur video were unlike a typical engine failure or fire scenario. While the evidence is still sparse, it’s far more suggestive of a bomb or missile, said Jeffrey Guzzetti, former chief of the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration’s accident investigation division.“Airplanes don’t just catch fire and have that fire spread like that in such a short period of time, unless there was an intentional act causing that fire and explosion,” Guzzetti said in an interview.The tragedy recalled the 2014 downing of a Malaysia Airlines jet by a surface-to-air missile during the conflict over Crimea, eventually blamed by investigators on pro-Russia rebels. Complicating matters, Iranian officials haven’t been clear about how much access U.S. experts will be given to the probe, or to the 737’s flight data recorders.Ghasem Biniaz, the head of communications for Iran’s Ministry of Roads and Urban Development, said reports of a missile attack are false, IRNA reported.A state-run news outlet cited an official at Iran’s Civil Aviation Organization as saying the pilots didn’t declare an emergency.If the amateur video turns out to be genuine, it indicates the plane was essentially a fireball as it plunged, Guzzetti said. Bright lights emanating from the aircraft suggest explosions as well, he said.Two other aviation safety experts urged caution about jumping to conclusions.“I wouldn’t take anything off the table right now,” said John Cox, a former airline pilot who is president of Safety Operating Systems. When asked about the potential for a bomb or missile, Cox said, “Certainly they are going to look at external forces.”It’s at least theoretically possible for a fast-moving cargo fire to take down a plane, said Roger Cox, a former NTSB investigator. A ValuJet plane crashed in Florida in 1996 after pure oxygen caused a raging inferno, he said. But even in that case, the plane flew for about 10 minutes, far longer than the Ukrainian plane.Ukraine International said 167 passengers and nine crew were on the 737, an older version of Boeing’s narrow-body workhorse that predates the Max model that was grounded last year following two fatal crashes.The model involved in the Iranian crash doesn’t use the flight control system implicated in the Max tragedies and has one of the best safety records of any jetliner.The Ukrainian jet lifted off and climbed to about 7,900 feet and was traveling at roughly 300 miles an hour when it stopped transmitting its position and disappeared, according to data supplied by FlightRadar24. Other aircraft operating out of Tehran were tracked normally, said FlightRadar24 spokesman Ian Petchenik.The plane came down at 6:18 a.m. Wednesday in Sabashahr, near the Iranian capital.Television footage showed recovery efforts at the crash site, with debris spread across a charred field. Ukraine’s foreign ministry said about half those on board held Iranian citizenship and that there were more than 60 Canadian citizens, as well as Swedes, Afghans, Britons and Ukrainians.Canada’s Transportation Safety Board said it has appointed an expert to review facts released by Iran and monitor the progress of the investigation.“Our government will continue to work closely with its international partners to ensure that this crash is thoroughly investigated, and that Canadians’ questions are answered,” Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said in a statement.Airlines Steer Clear of Iran and Iraq After Missile AttacksUkraine International Vice President Ihor Sosnovskyi said in Kyiv that the plane, delivered to the airline new in 2016, was in good condition and had its last shop visit on Jan. 6. He said the crew was also very experienced and that there were no indications of human error, while declining to comment on possible reasons for the crash, the company’s first since it was set up in 1992.Under established protocols, Iran would lead any investigation because the crash occurred on its soil. Ukraine Prime Minister Oleksiy Honcharuk said his government has informed Iran that its experts should take part.Few nations have the expertise and technical facilities to conduct a full accident probe, however, so the U.S., France, Britain or other countries have provided assistance in the past. The plane’s crash-proof recorders will have to be downloaded in a specialist lab.International rules for air-crash probes mean the countries that made the plane and its engines usually participate, providing technical expertise. But the current turmoil between Iran and the U.S. may complicate the involvement of the NTSB and Boeing.Black Boxes“Accident investigations should stand above politics,” Safety Operating Systems’ John Cox said. “I’m hopeful that all the governments will put politics aside and let a transparent accident investigation take place.”Hassan Rezaeifar, head of the Iranian Civil Aviation Organization’s accident-investigation office, said it’s for Iran to decide how and where the plane’s so-called black boxes are decoded, “as per the law,” according to the semi-official ISNA news agency.Reza Jafarzadeh, a spokesman for the aviation organization, told Bloomberg News that his nation observes international protocols, and that Ukraine, “as well as the planemaker,” can take part in the probe.France’s BEA hasn’t been contacted for assistance but has helped Iran in the past, said a spokesman, Sebastien Barthe.Boeing Jet That Crashed in Iran Was Predecessor to 737 MaxThe tragedy comes at a tense time for both Iran and Boeing.The Islamic republic fired more than a dozen missiles at U.S. bases in retaliation for the killing of Iran’s top general, Qassem Soleimani. Just prior to the crash, U.S. aviation regulators issued new restrictions barring civilian flights over Iraq and Iran.The U.S. State Department issued a statement offering assistance to Ukraine. “The United States calls for complete cooperation with any investigation into the cause of the crash,” according to the statement.Boeing is still gripped by one of the worst crises in its 103-year history after the two Max disasters led to the grounding of that fleet in March. The company said in a statement that its thoughts are with crew, passengers and their families after the tragedy, without commenting on the cause. The planemaker’s stock declined 1.8% to $331.37 at the close in New York.Engines for the single-aisle plane are made by CFM International, a joint venture of General Electric Co. and Safran SA. A representative didn’t comment on the details or possible cause of the crash but said by email that CFM extends “heartfelt sympathies to the families and loved ones off those on board.”(Updates with additional detail and commentary by experts, beginning in fifth paragraph)\--With assistance from Harry Suhartono, Kyunghee Park, Anurag Kotoky, Eduard Gismatullin, Angus Whitley, Layan Odeh, Paul Dobson, Will Davies, Rudy Ruitenberg, Volodymyr Verbyany, Julie Johnsson and Richard Clough.To contact the reporters on this story: Christopher Jasper in London at cjasper@bloomberg.net;Arsalan Shahla in Tehran at ashahla@bloomberg.net;Daryna Krasnolutska in Kyiv at dkrasnolutsk@bloomberg.net;Alan Levin in Washington at alevin24@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Jon Morgan at jmorgan97@bloomberg.net;Anthony Palazzo at apalazzo@bloomberg.net;Brendan Case at bcase4@bloomberg.netFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • MarketWatch

    GE's stock extends pullback; GE and Safran JV made engines for Boeing's 737-800 which suffered fatal crash

    Shares of General Electric Co. fell 0.9% in midday trading, to extend their pullback from a more than 14-month high earlier this week. A 50-50 joint venture between GE and Safran S.A.'s aircraft engine unit makes CFM-56 aircraft engines used in Boeing Co.'s 737-800 aircraft. A Ukraine International Airlines 737-800 jet crashed enroute to Kyiv crashed in Tehran on Wednesday, killing all 176 people on board. Boeing's stock fell 1.3%. GE's stock has now declined 1.6% since it closed at $12.14 on Monday, which was the highest close since Oct. 23, 2018. It has soared 44.3% over the past three months, while the Dow Jones Industrial Average has gained 9.9%.

  • Market Exclusive

    Market Morning: Iran Responds, Another 737 Down, Impossible Scraps McDonald’s, Aramco Falls

    Iran Responds, Minimally Iran has responded to the killing of General Qassem Solemani with ballistic missiles against US forces in Iraq. As far as the media is aware, there were no US casualties, meaning the response could be little more than a face-saving operation to assuage the Iranian people rather than inflict actual damage on […]The post Market Morning: Iran Responds, Another 737 Down, Impossible Scraps McDonald's, Aramco Falls appeared first on Market Exclusive.

  • Is Safran's (EPA:SAF) 173% Share Price Increase Well Justified?
    Simply Wall St.

    Is Safran's (EPA:SAF) 173% Share Price Increase Well Justified?

    The worst result, after buying shares in a company (assuming no leverage), would be if you lose all the money you put...

  • Safran suspends electric jet taxiing project after Airbus ends talks
    Reuters

    Safran suspends electric jet taxiing project after Airbus ends talks

    France's Safran SA has shelved plans to install an electric taxiing system on Airbus A320 jets after the planemaker halted discussions on the project, it chief executive said. Several such projects emerged during a spike in oil prices earlier this decade and have come to the fore again due to pressure to reduce emissions, but development has been hindered by weaker oil prices and shifts in jet flying patterns. Safran acknowledges the system would be uneconomic for long flights because those jets do not spend enough time taxiing to justify carrying the motors, which weigh some 400 kg (882 lb).

  • Reuters

    UPDATE 1-Safran CEO cautious on supply chain once Boeing grounding lifted

    The head of French jet engine maker Safran has voiced caution over the ability of aerospace supply chains to ramp up quickly after the return to service of the Boeing 737 MAX, which has been grounded for months following two fatal accidents. Safran co-produces the LEAP engine for the MAX through its CFM International joint venture with General Electric. Once the jet returns to service - the timing of which is in the hands of regulators - Boeing plans to reach a previously targeted production level of 57 aircraft a month by end-2020 from its current rate of 42, down from 52 before the grounding.

  • France's Safran and Germany's MTU to work on new fighter engine
    Reuters

    France's Safran and Germany's MTU to work on new fighter engine

    France's Safran and MTU Aero Engines of Germany have agreed to develop together a jet engine for a Franco-German fighter, removing a key obstacle to one of Europe's flagship defence projects. Negotiations between the two companies have dragged on for months as the parties debated who should lead the efforts to develop an engine for the strategic Franco-German project. Safran will take the lead in engine design and integration, and MTU will take the lead in engine services, they said.

  • Safran CEO cautious on supply chain once Boeing grounding lifted
    Reuters

    Safran CEO cautious on supply chain once Boeing grounding lifted

    The head of French jet engine maker Safran has voiced caution over the ability of aerospace supply chains to ramp up quickly after the return to service of the Boeing 737 MAX, which has been grounded for months following two fatal accidents. Safran co-produces the LEAP engine for the MAX through its CFM International joint venture with General Electric . Once the jet returns to service - the timing of which is in the hands of regulators - Boeing plans to reach a previously targeted production level of 57 aircraft a month by end-2020 from its current rate of 42, down from 52 before the grounding.

  • Reuters

    Safran and MTU reach agreement on co-operation on military jet engine - sources

    French engine maker Safran and German counterpart MTU Aero Engines have reached an agreement to cooperate on a military jet engine, removing an obstacle to developing a Franco-German fighter, sources familiar with the matter said. The agreement, which follows a letter of intention signed in February, calls for Safran to be the prime contractor with MTU as "main partner" they said.

  • Does Safran SA's (EPA:SAF) Recent Track Record Look Strong?
    Simply Wall St.

    Does Safran SA's (EPA:SAF) Recent Track Record Look Strong?

    Analyzing Safran SA's (ENXTPA:SAF) track record of past performance is a valuable exercise for investors. It enables...

  • Reuters

    UPDATE 1-France's Safran maintains outlook as Q3 sales rise

    French aerospace supplier Safran SA on Thursday reaffirmed its recently upgraded full-year financial outlook as it posted higher third-quarter revenues, buoyed by sales of current-generation civil and military jet engines. Safran, which co-produces civil jet engines with General Electric, also confirmed a goal of producing around 1,800 new-generation LEAP engines in 2019 based on Boeing's current production rate for the grounded 737 MAX jetliner. Boeing cut production of the LEAP-powered 737 MAX to 42 aircraft a month after it was grounded in March, keeping its assembly lines running at a slightly reduced rate in order to avoid stop-start disruption to its supply chain.

  • Reuters

    Aerospace supplier Safran maintains full-year outlook as Q3 sales rise

    French aerospace supplier Safran SA on Thursday confirmed its full-year financial outlook, after it posted higher third-quarter revenues, buoyed by sales of current-generation civil and military jet engines. Safran, which co-produces civil jet engines with General Electric, also confirmed a goal of producing around 1,800 new-generation LEAP engines in 2019 based on Boeing's current production rate for the grounded 737 MAX jetliner. Boeing cut production of the LEAP-powered 737 MAX to 42 aircraft a month after it was grounded in March, keeping its assembly lines running at a slightly reduced rate in order to avoid stop-start disruption to its supply chain.

  • Reuters

    UPDATE 2-GE still sees $1.4 billion cash cost from Boeing 737 MAX grounding in 2019

    General Electric Co still expects the grounding of Boeing Co's 737 MAX jetliner to reduce its cash flow by $1.4 billion in 2019, provided the aircraft remains grounded all year, GE Chief Executive Larry Culp said during a conference call on quarterly earnings on Wednesday. “As we think about 2020, I think we’re going to try to follow Boeing’s lead here,” Culp said, responding to an analyst question.

  • CORRECTED-UPDATE 1-General Electric not forecasting 737 MAX return to service this year
    Reuters

    CORRECTED-UPDATE 1-General Electric not forecasting 737 MAX return to service this year

    General Electric Co is not forecasting the Boeing Co 737 MAX jetliner will return to service this year, GE Chief Executive Larry Culp said during a conference call on quarterly earnings on Wednesday. "As we think about 2020, I think we're going to try to follow Boeing's lead here," Culp said, responding to an analyst question. Boeing has said it expects the jet to clear approval by U.S. regulators by year-end.

  • Reuters

    UPDATE 2-Star French banker Pigasse resigns from Lazard

    French banker Matthieu Pigasse is to leave Lazard after 17 years to pursue a new entrepreneurial project, an exit that will see the firm lose one of its biggest rainmakers. For Lazard, Pigasse has led the world's largest sovereign debt restructurings in Greece, Argentina and Ukraine, as well as multi-billion mergers such as those between Unibail-Rodamco and Westfield, Sanofi and Boehringer Ingelheim, Safran and Zodiac. "I am excited to begin my next chapter beyond investment banking in a new entrepreneurial project," Lazard cited Pigasse as saying.

  • These Factors Make Safran SA (EPA:SAF) An Interesting Investment
    Simply Wall St.

    These Factors Make Safran SA (EPA:SAF) An Interesting Investment

    As an investor, I look for investments which does not compromise one fundamental factor for another. By this I mean, I...