SAN - Banco Santander, S.A.

NYSE - Nasdaq Real Time Price. Currency in USD
2.2150
+0.1350 (+6.49%)
As of 2:00PM EDT. Market open.
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Performance Outlook
  • Short Term
    2W - 6W
  • Mid Term
    6W - 9M
  • Long Term
    9M+
Previous Close2.0800
Open2.2000
Bid2.2100 x 27000
Ask2.2200 x 306100
Day's Range2.1800 - 2.2400
52 Week Range1.9000 - 4.7400
Volume11,650,342
Avg. Volume10,753,014
Market Cap36.718B
Beta (5Y Monthly)1.49
PE Ratio (TTM)4.60
EPS (TTM)0.4820
Earnings DateJan 25, 2017 - Feb 01, 2017
Forward Dividend & YieldN/A (N/A)
Ex-Dividend DateOct 30, 2019
1y Target Est3.76
Fair Value is the appropriate price for the shares of a company, based on its earnings and growth rate also interpreted as when P/E Ratio = Growth Rate. Estimated return represents the projected annual return you might expect after purchasing shares in the company and holding them over the default time horizon of 5 years, based on the EPS growth rate that we have projected.
Fair Value
XX.XX
Undervalued
7% Est. Return
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  • Is Banco Santander (SAN) a Great Stock for Value Investors?
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    Is Banco Santander (SAN) a Great Stock for Value Investors?

    Let's see if Banco Santander (SAN) stock is a good choice for value-oriented investors right now from multiple angles.

  • Reuters

    Lobby calls on EU for extra capital easing to help banks lend more

    A banking lobby group called on Tuesday for the European Union to further soften a capital measure to ensure banks do not run out of headroom to help companies hit by the coronavirus crisis. The Association for Financial Markets in Europe (AFME) said the European Central Bank (ECB) has estimated that such measures will free up 120 billion euros ($131 billion) to support 1.8 trillion euros of additional lending. "The question is are these changes going to be sufficient to furnish banks with enough capacity to provide the support to their customers that is going to be needed in the coming downturn, let alone the recovery?" Michael Lever, head of prudential regulation at AFME, said in a blog post.

  • Financial Times

    Santander unit agrees $550m deceptive lending settlement

    The Dallas-based lender was accused of writing car loans it knew would have “an unacceptably high probability of default”. The listed company is majority owned by Spain’s Banco Santander. Among the allegations are claims Santander’s “aggressive pursuit of market share” led it to turn “a blind eye to dealer abuse”, such as falsified information about the financial health of borrowers.

  • Financial Times

    Banks probe sales push linked to corporate loans

    Banks in the UK are investigating whether they pressured corporate clients into giving them extra business in return for loans, after the country’s financial watchdog warned against the practice during the coronavirus pandemic. Lenders including Barclays, Deutsche Bank, HSBC and Santander are conducting internal reviews to find out whether any of their investment bankers tried to link emergency financing to more lucrative services, according to people familiar with the matter. Last month the Financial Conduct Authority sent an unusually strongly-worded letter to the heads of UK lenders after receiving “credible reports” that some were abusing their lending relationships with struggling clients to strong-arm them into buying other services, while negotiating new or existing debt facilities.

  • 'I'm living on cards': The firms waiting for emergency loans
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    'I'm living on cards': The firms waiting for emergency loans

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  • French government’s Sanofi bashing smacks of hypocrisy
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    French government’s Sanofi bashing smacks of hypocrisy

    French President Emmanuel Macron was reportedly “angry” when he heard that the French pharmaceutical was considering making the U.S. market a priority for the manufacturing and distribution of its eventual coronavirus vaccine.

  • Moody's

    Banco Santander Totta S.A. -- Moody's announces completion of a periodic review of ratings of Banco Santander Totta S.A.

    Announcement of Periodic Review: Moody's announces completion of a periodic review of ratings of Banco Santander Totta S.A. Madrid, May 12, 2020 -- Moody's Investors Service ("Moody's") has completed a periodic review of the ratings of Banco Santander Totta S.A. and other ratings that are associated with the same analytical unit. The review was conducted through a portfolio review in which Moody's reassessed the appropriateness of the ratings in the context of the relevant principal methodology(ies), recent developments, and a comparison of the financial and operating profile to similarly rated peers.

  • Moody's

    Santander Consumer Finance S.A. -- Moody's announces completion of a periodic review of ratings of Santander Consumer Finance S.A.

    Announcement of Periodic Review: Moody's announces completion of a periodic review of ratings of Santander Consumer Finance S.A. Madrid, May 12, 2020 -- Moody's Investors Service ("Moody's") has completed a periodic review of the ratings of Santander Consumer Finance S.A. and other ratings that are associated with the same analytical unit. The review was conducted through a portfolio review in which Moody's reassessed the appropriateness of the ratings in the context of the relevant principal methodology(ies), recent developments, and a comparison of the financial and operating profile to similarly rated peers.

  • Moody's

    Santander Int'l Debt, S.A. Unipersonal -- Moody's announces completion of a periodic review of ratings of Banco Santander S.A. (Spain)

    Moody's Investors Service ("Moody's") has completed a periodic review of the ratings of Banco Santander S.A. (Spain) and other ratings that are associated with the same analytical unit. The review was conducted through a portfolio review in which Moody's reassessed the appropriateness of the ratings in the context of the relevant principal methodology(ies), recent developments, and a comparison of the financial and operating profile to similarly rated peers. Since 1 January 2019, Moody's practice has been to issue a press release following each periodic review to announce its completion.

  • Reuters

    Banks can withstand pandemic fallout on economy - BoE

    A "desk top" stress test has shown that top banks and building societies can withstand the anticipated economic fallout from the coronavirus pandemic, the Bank of England said on Thursday. The BoE's Financial Stability Report said the stress test was based on an economic scenario outlined by the Bank's Monetary Policy Report (MPR).

  • Should We Worry About Banco Santander, S.A.'s (BME:SAN) P/E Ratio?
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  • Banco Santander, S.A. (SAN) Q1 2020 Earnings Call Transcript
    Motley Fool

    Banco Santander, S.A. (SAN) Q1 2020 Earnings Call Transcript

    SAN earnings call for the period ending March 31, 2020.

  • Banco Santander Chile (BSAC) Q1 2020 Earnings Call Transcript
    Motley Fool

    Banco Santander Chile (BSAC) Q1 2020 Earnings Call Transcript

    BSAC earnings call for the period ending March 31, 2020.

  • Benzinga

    Recap: Banco Santander Q1 Earnings

    Shares of Banco Santander (NYSE:BSBR) rose 13% after the company reported Q1 results.Quarterly Results Earnings per share fell 8.33% year over year to $0.11.Revenue of $2,585,000,000 lower by 26.44% year over year.Outlook Banco Santander hasn't issued any earnings guidance for the time being.View more earnings on BSBRRevenue guidance hasn't been issued by the company for now.Price Action Company's 52-week high was at $12.85Company's 52-week low was at $4.00Price action over last quarter: down 52.33%Company Profile Banco Santander (Brasil) SA is part of Santander Group, a Spanish bank present also in Brazil, Mexico, Argentina, and Chile. The bank's operations are divided into two major divisions: commercial banking, which includes retail activities, such as personal and small and medium enterprises; and wholesale, focused on large companies and operations in the capital market. The bank has commercial, investment, credit, and financing operations and also exchange, mortgage lending, leasing, credit cards, and securities brokerage. Its operations are in Brazil and internationally.See more from Benzinga * Morning Market Stats in 5 Minutes * Stocks That Hit 52-Week Lows On Friday(C) 2020 Benzinga.com. Benzinga does not provide investment advice. All rights reserved.

  • HSBC, Santander and UBS set aside billions for loan losses for coronavirus
    MarketWatch

    HSBC, Santander and UBS set aside billions for loan losses for coronavirus

    HSBC, Santander and UBS set aside billions of loan loss provisions as they prepare for a wave of credit losses caused by the coronavirus pandemic.

  • Santander's profit slides as it sets aside $1.7 billion for COVID-19 loan losses
    Reuters

    Santander's profit slides as it sets aside $1.7 billion for COVID-19 loan losses

    Banking giant Santander's quarterly net profit dived by 82% as it set aside 1.6 billion euros ($1.7 billion) to cover expected loan losses caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. The euro zone's second-largest bank by market value, after BNP Paribas, reported a net profit of 331 million euros for the first quarter that ended in March. Excluding extraordinary provisions, which also included 46 million euros of restructuring costs in Europe, Santander's underlying quarterly profit rose 1% to 1.98 billion euros.

  • Santander Takes Europe’s Biggest Provisions for Coronavirus
    Bloomberg

    Santander Takes Europe’s Biggest Provisions for Coronavirus

    (Bloomberg) -- Banco Santander SA reported the highest provisions by a bank in continental Europe so far this quarter as it attempted to put a number on potential loan losses caused by the coronavirus outbreak.Santander is holding back 1.6 billion euros ($1.7 billion) specifically for losses linked to the virus. Total provisions jumped to a record 3.9 billion euros in the first quarter, causing net income to plunge 82% to 331 million euros, the bank said in a statement.Provisions have become the key focus of this year’s earnings season, with banks trying to estimate the impact of the global economic lockdown on its customers. Santander has spent most of the past decade cleaning up its balance sheet after Spain’s housing market collapsed in 2012, souring billions of euros of loans.Like many competitors, Santander was reluctant to set specific targets going forward as uncertainties remain over the virus’s impact and government economic relief efforts.“We will review our strategic targets once we have a more complete understanding of the full impact of the crisis,” Chairman Ana Botin said in an emailed statement. “However, we are confident in the fundamentals of our business model and the pillars of our strategy remain unchanged.”Santander fell as much as 1.5% in Madrid trading and was down 0.6% at 1.96 euros as of 9:04 a.m. The stock has slumped about 48% this year, compared with the 41% decline of the STOXX Europe 600 Banks Index.Latin AmericaSantander already had the highest provisions of any European bank due to its exposure to emerging markets such as Brazil and Mexico as well as to its sub-prime auto loan business in the U.S. Provisions increased to the highest level in five years in the fourth quarter, mainly due to Europe, where the lender has struggled with low interest rates. The amount set aside tripled at its consumer finance unit and doubled in the U.K. in the last three months of 2019.The coronavirus, which hit Spain in the second half of March, had little impact on first-quarter earnings. Underlying profit rose 8% from a year earlier to 2 billion euros, once again showing major differences between lender’s stronger and weaker international markets. The Americas, Brazil and the U.S. posted solid profit in their own currencies while European units once again lagged behind.The U.K. continued to be a trouble spot for the group, with underlying profit falling 27% due to lower income from lending and fees.Earnings gave some indication of the new order for business in the coronavirus crisis. New mortgage lending fell 60% and new consumer loans dropped 25% in April compared with February. On the other hand, corporate loans and lending to small-and medium-sized enterprises rose 100% in the same period.HSBC Holdings Plc on Tuesday reported it will take its biggest charge for bad debt in almost nine years, reporting provisions of $3 billion in the first quarter. Last week, UniCredit SpA increased provisions by 900 million euros while Credit Suisse Group AG set aside more than double what analysts estimated, reserving $1 billion to cover for the impact of the virus. Deutsche Bank AG on Sunday said it made about 500 million euros of provisions, pushing its total to the highest in six years.(Updates with chairman’s comments in fifth paragraph, details of provisions, earnings after Latin America subheadline)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Top European Lenders Fill Pandemic Void as U.S. Banks Eye Home
    Bloomberg

    Top European Lenders Fill Pandemic Void as U.S. Banks Eye Home

    (Bloomberg) -- As U.S. banks shift their focus to America amid the coronavirus pandemic, a select group of European lenders sees an unexpected window to win back market share.BNP Paribas SA has been the most aggressive, leading the five biggest corporate loans in Europe since the beginning of March, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.Banco Santander SA, Credit Agricole SA and HSBC Holdings Plc each had a top role on two of the region’s largest loans since the pandemic. JPMorgan Chase & Co. was the only U.S. bank to take the lead on more than one of those transactions, the data show.For a small cadre of European banks, the crisis is throwing up unprecedented opportunities to deepen ties with major companies and win clients, work that they hope to parlay into other business down the road. It’s also giving them a chance to claw back ground that has been lost since the financial crisis to their more aggressive U.S. rivals, who are pulling back from some lending in the region.“This situation is a searching pass for the idea to have a strong European bank,” said Robert Buess, a Zurich-based partner at Oliver Wyman who advises financial institutions. “It’s a good moment for banks to win back market share in investment banking and other businesses by providing loans in difficult times.”Most ActiveBut it doesn’t come without risk. The coronavirus pandemic is roiling Europe’s already feeble financial industry, driving up provisions for bad loans and prompting billions in writedowns. And while the likes of Goldman Sachs Group Inc. and Morgan Stanley are becoming more selective on lending in the region amid rising demand back home, Wall Street firms continue to have a firm grip on more profitable businesses like mergers and initial public offerings.Still, at Paris-based BNP Paribas, the group charged with making loans to corporate clients has never been busier. In one particularly manic week after the outbreak, BNP Paribas got requests for more than 90 new credit lines, according to people familiar with the matter.The marching orders from the top have been to get out there and lend, the people said. And this has been well beyond the safe confines of state-backed aid programs in their home markets. BNP Paribas, France’s biggest bank, was sole underwriter on U.K. oil giant BP Plc’s $10 billion facility last month, according to people with knowledge of the matter.Santander has also been targeting large, established European companies such as Daimler AG and Royal Dutch Shell Plc where it can leverage its lending capabilities to win market share, one person said. The Spanish bank has seen a pickup in lending as a result of the crisis, with average daily loan origination in March growing by 16% from February, Chairman Ana Botin said at an April 3 shareholder meeting.Speedy ReviewsRisk teams at lenders including BNP Paribas and HSBC have been swamped with requests for new loans and are speeding up reviews to keep up with demand, the people said, asking not to be identified because the information is private. They’re trying to make decisions within hours, instead of the usual days-long process.The flurry of activity is a welcome change from recent years when European banks were more focused on building up capital buffers after the 2008 financial crisis. Lenders in the region raised equity, exited non-core businesses and pared back trading operations. All the while, U.S. banks were expanding in Europe, poaching clients and staff from their struggling competitors on the continent.Many European lenders, including Deutsche Bank AG and Commerzbank AG, are ramping up lending in their home markets through government programs, the people said. Germany and Italy have each allocated more than 30% of gross domestic product to direct spending, bank guarantees, and loan and equity injections, for a combined $1.84 trillion in aid, figures from the International Monetary Fund show.Spokespeople for BNP Paribas, Commerzbank, Deutsche Bank, Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley declined to comment. A representative for Santander declined to comment ahead of the bank’s earnings, while a representative for HSBC said he couldn’t immediately comment.European lenders’ increased activity comes at a time when U.S. banks are being inundated with borrowing requests from cash-strapped American companies. Like all banks, they’re having to be more selective about who they provide funds to, and in some cases may need to turn down transactions with longtime European clients.BNP Paribas, Santander, HSBC and Deutsche Bank topped the rankings for bookrunners on European corporate loans so far this year, with all gaining market share, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. Bank of America Corp. and Citigroup Inc. -- among the biggest U.S. balance sheet lenders -- slipped in the league tables for the same period, as did Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley, the data show.The trend hasn’t gone unnoticed, with the Financial Times and Reuters also writing about American lenders retrenching, leaving an opening for their European counterparts.“Large U.S. financial institutions no doubt feel obliged to support their largest clients now,” said Julian van Kan, the head of Mitsubishi UFJ Financial Group Inc.’s financial institutions group for Europe, the Middle East and Africa. “If you look at all the support in whatever form provided by central banks and governments, it’s an obligation by virtue to deploy the money to where it’s coming from.”Stronger BanksIn one recent example, two major U.S. lenders that were in talks to join Daimler’s 12 billion-euro credit line this month ended up not participating, the people said. A representative for Daimler declined to comment.The stronger European banks will win market share from U.S. lenders and their weaker regional competitors by lending to local companies that have been neglected, said Davide Serra, the founder of Algebris Investments.“If you are a U.S. bank in Europe, you are basically a tourist,” he said. “You only stay if prices are not high and if the weather is nice. When it’s not, you run for the hills.”For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

  • Should You Buy Banco Santander (BSBR) Ahead of Earnings?
    Zacks

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  • Moody's

    Instit.para la Protec.al Ahorro Bancario -- Moody's downgrades eight Mexican banks and the IPAB; outlook negative

    Rating Action: Moody's downgrades eight Mexican banks and the IPAB; outlook negative. Global Credit Research- 22 Apr 2020. Mexico, April 22, 2020-- Moody's de México has today downgraded to Baa1, from ...

  • Moody's

    Grupo Financiero Santander México SAB de CV -- Moody's downgrades eight Mexican banks and the IPAB; outlook negative

    Rating Action: Moody's downgrades eight Mexican banks and the IPAB; outlook negative. Global Credit Research- 22 Apr 2020. Mexico, April 22, 2020-- Moody's de México has today downgraded to Baa1, from ...

  • Italy’s top banker is taking a 75% pay cut. Any followers?
    MarketWatch

    Italy’s top banker is taking a 75% pay cut. Any followers?

    Jean Pierre Mustier, UniCredit Chief Executive, will have shrunk his total compensation this year by 75%. The question is whether he will now be followed by others.

  • Reuters

    RPT-Europe's banks brace for bad debt build up from coronavirus crisis

    Europe's banks are expected to have to set aside billions for potential loan losses as well as take profit hits because of the coronavirus crisis when they start reporting results over the next two weeks. The largest U.S. banks, which reported earnings last week, set aside $25 billion for credit losses in the first quarter, raising questions about whether European banks would follow suit. Analysts over the past 30 days have revised upward by almost 130% their expectations for loan loss provisions in 2020 by Europe's most important banks, according to a Reuters analysis of data from Refinitiv.

  • Reuters

    Europe's banks brace for bad debt build up from coronavirus crisis

    Europe's banks are expected to have to set aside billions for potential loan losses as well as take profit hits because of the coronavirus crisis when they start reporting results over the next two weeks. The largest U.S. banks, which reported earnings last week, set aside $25 billion for credit losses in the first quarter, raising questions about whether European banks would follow suit. Analysts over the past 30 days have revised upward by almost 130% their expectations for loan loss provisions in 2020 by Europe's most important banks, according to a Reuters analysis of data from Refinitiv.